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Old May 18, 2004, 6:18 PM   #1
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I was thinking I read where you could have the output of the SB800 controlled by the distance from the D70 camera to the subject rather than by the light coming back through the lens. I am shooting into bright window light and want the strobe setting to ignore the back light and be set automatcially for proper exposure at that distance as the camera focuses. Does anyone know if this can be done and how?

I've already learned that it's easy to swing away from the window to a dark area, lock the light output of the strobe and swing back to the window, but that requires several steps it would be nice to avoid.

These are the type photos we are shooting. All of these are older and were shot with a point and shoot film camera, scanned and Photoshopped, but they illustrate the project.

http://www.pbase.com/kathiej

Thanks for any help.

Deane
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Old May 18, 2004, 7:01 PM   #2
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THe distance information is sent to the camera when you use the D and G lens (CPU lenses) in combination with any DX Nikon flashesand is taken in to the final calulation for final exposure as Niknon call it D-TTL multi sensor matrix metering. The new I-TTL mode is claim to be better than this mode when you use the SB800 DXor SB600 DX with the new D70 or D2H cameras.
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Old May 18, 2004, 11:15 PM   #3
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Actually, if you read the manual on GN mode, it's not the camera/lens that sets the distance for which the flash automatically adjusts output, but you, the user enter the apropriate distance and from that point forth you can change apeture and ISO values, and as long as you are shooting subjects at the given distance, the flash will adjust its output for correct exposure. It's useless for keeping up with moving subjects, unless you plan on shooting a subject at a predetermined point (distance) where you know the subject will pass through.
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Old May 19, 2004, 3:15 AM   #4
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Flick the lever on your lens to Manual focus mode, and enjoy the freedom to vary flash output with varying point of focus.

Manipulate it and take pics at each setting and you'll see you can consistently alter the brightness of the flash by altering the point of focus.
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Old May 19, 2004, 8:47 AM   #5
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Not try to be so complicated, as I explained above, the Nikon D-TTL and I-TTL already do a good job of taking the distance information, the pre flash output, the bright or dark background in to the final calculation when the meter behind the lens reading the subject. When youswitch to manual mode, there are some basic information you need to know before doing your guess work to set exposure, first your guide number at your ISO setting, and the guide number on any Nikon flash with zoom head is vary, at 24mm setting is difference than @ 50mm and so on. You need to decide to use the number base on feet or meter, then the distance from the camera to subject (by beet or meter). The basic calculation is the guide number divide by the distance to get the F-stop; this is your aperture-setting base on your default synchro speed (shutter speed) of your camera. The procedure already includes a lot of guess works and non-reliable, even more complicate when multi flashes are used. Set the D-TTL or I-TTL mode, they do very good job over 85 % of all situations; you can adjust the exposure by using the exposure compensation in flash mode.

If you really want to get in to the business of using manual mode with flash, to take all of the guess works away, you need a flash meter, and by using the incident reading at the subject position, bright or dark background will not affect the reading at all by the meter.

Cheers

N

Not try to be so complicated, as I explained above, the Nikon D-TTL and I-TTL already do a good job of taking the distance information, the pre flash output, the bright or dark background in to the final calculation when the meter behind the lens reading the subject. When youswitch to manual mode, there are some basic information you need to know before doing your guess work to set exposure, first your guide number at your ISO setting, and the guide number on any Nikon flash with zoom head is vary, at 24mm setting is difference than @ 50mm and so on. You need to decide to use the number base on feet or meter, then the distance from the camera to subject (by beet or meter). The basic calculation is the guide number divide by the distance to get the F-stop; this is your aperture-setting base on your default synchro speed (shutter speed) of your camera. The procedure already includes a lot of guess works and non-reliable, even more complicate when multi flashes are used. Set the D-TTL or I-TTL mode, they do very good job over 85 % of all situations; you can adjust the exposure by using the exposure compensation in flash mode.

If you really want to get in to the business of using manual mode with flash, to take all of the guess works away, you need a flash meter, and by using the incident reading at the subject position, bright or dark background will not affect the reading at all by the meter.

Cheers

ot try to be so complicated, as I explained above, the Nikon D-TTL and I-TTL already do a good job of taking the distance information, the pre flash output, the bright or dark background in to the final calculation when the meter behind the lens reading the subject. When youswitch to manual mode, there are some basic information you need to know before doing your guess work to set exposure, first your guide number at your ISO setting, and the guide number on any Nikon flash with zoom head is vary, at 24mm setting is difference than @ 50mm and so on. You need to decide to use the number base on feet or meter, then the distance from the camera to subject (by beet or meter). The basic calculation is the guide number divide by the distance to get the F-stop; this is your aperture-setting base on your default synchro speed (shutter speed) of your camera. The procedure already includes a lot of guess works and non-reliable, even more complicate when multi flashes are used. Set the D-TTL or I-TTL mode, they do very good job over 85 % of all situations; you can adjust the exposure by using the exposure compensation in flash mode.

If you really want to get in to the business of using manual mode with flash, to take all of the guess works away, you need a flash meter, and by using the incident reading at the subject position, bright or dark background will not affect the reading at all by the meter.

Cheers
Not try to be so complicated, as I explained above, the Nikon D-TTL and I-TTL already do a good job of taking the distance information, the pre flash output, the bright or dark background in to the final calculation when the meter behind the lens reading the subject. When youswitch to manual mode, there are some basic information you need to know before doing your guess work to set exposure, first your guide number at your ISO setting, and the guide number on any Nikon flash with zoom head is vary, at 24mm setting is difference than @ 50mm and so on. You need to decide to use the number base on feet or meter, then the distance from the camera to subject (by beet or meter). The basic calculation is the guide number divide by the distance to get the F-stop; this is your aperture-setting base on your default synchro speed (shutter speed) of your camera. The procedure already includes a lot of guess works and non-reliable, even more complicate when multi flashes are used. Set the D-TTL or I-TTL mode, they do very good job over 85 % of all situations; you can adjust the exposure by using the exposure compensation in flash mode.


If you really want to get in to the business of using manual mode with flash, to take all of the guess works away, you need a flash meter, and by using the incident reading at the subject position, bright or dark background will not affect the reading at all by the meter.

Cheers
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Old May 19, 2004, 1:40 PM   #6
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It seems to me that there is a much easier way to handle the balance between flash and available light. Your camera should have two compensation adjustments, one for normal exposure and one for flash. These can both be used at the same time. The flash compensation adjusts the power of the flash. By varying these two controls, you can control the balance between light from the flash and available light.
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