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Old Jun 17, 2004, 12:47 AM   #1
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I just received a D70 today which I ordered from B & H. I had never handled the camera and I was somewhat surprised at the weight especially when compared to the Minolta A2 that I am also trying. After reading all the surperlatives written about the D70 I just had to have one. Now I'm wondering if it's worth it.

The A2 is a great camera and its photos seem almost as good as the Nikon's. I know that the D70 is capable of shooting at a much higherISO with less grain and this comes in handy in low light photography. However the A2 has a longer zoom, image stabilization and is much lighter. It also has a great viewfinder.

Have any of you had this dilema? Your opinion would be greatly appreciat ed.

Thanks

Don






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Old Jun 17, 2004, 8:23 AM   #2
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Yes, it is worth it. Yes, the A2 is lighter and has a longer zoom but the weight of the D70 is not tiresome and has a multitude of lens options; you get one lens that is not changeable and that is it with the A2. Yes, the A2 has a good viewfinder but it is electronic which can be a little deceiving when compared to an optical viewfinder.

That having been said, the D70 does have a lot to learn if you have not used and SLR (especially a digital SLR) before. I have used film SLR's in the past, but there is alot new to learn about the camera itself and its capabilities/features (like uploading custom curves and how they effect an image). I'm not saying the A2 is not an advanced camera and has its own learning curve, but it is just not as advanced as the D70/D100/10D/etc.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 11:43 AM   #3
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It depends on your needs. I love my D70. It takes great pictures, it's fast, light weight, battery life is excellent, etc. To get the most out of the camera though, as dcrawley stated, there is a big learning curve to the camera if you are not familar with Dslr's. Sure, you can put it on all auto and get some great shots, butIMHOit defeats the purpose of getting the D70.
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 12:12 PM   #4
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Obviously depends on your circumstances, but over the here in the UK all 5 of the 8mp pro-sumer fixed-lens slr's have been slated in the reviews for noise, and chromatic abberation. ( particularly the sony 828 )

It seems cramming as many pixels as physically possible onto a very small CCD is not condusive to image quality, as the pixels just get very hot, producing noise.

Yes the budget DSLR's are more expensive with shorter zoom lenses and less resolution/megapixels but... you are buying versatility in the choice of lenses (and quality) available. Furthermore bigger CCD's mean each pixel captures more detail with less noise.

Whilst the Minolta A2 appears to have had the best reviews out of the 8mp pro-sumer's over here, I still can't help thinking these cameras are marketed at people who just think more megapixel = better pictures maybe, when there are actually a host of other things that need to be considered like the sensor and lenses and so on?

Just my opinions, but I think youv'e made the right decision with the D70 :-)
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Old Jun 23, 2004, 1:10 PM   #5
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I just bought a D70 a few months ago and went through this same thing. The A2 looks like a great camera but it still has all of the limitations of a P&S digicam. The main one being that you are stuck with one lens. Forget about conversion lenses because they don't compare to the huge catalog of available Nikon compatible lenses out there. I had an Olympus C-4000Z that produced excellent images and was very compact and light with Li-ion batteries installed but, personally, I prefer the size and weight of the D70. It is lightning fast and has much greater flexibility. I wouldn't get stuck on the resolution either. There are pros shooting with 4 and 6 mp dslr's out there. I doubt many are using A2's.

If you are really serious about photography, the D70 is the way to go.
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Old Jun 23, 2004, 6:08 PM   #6
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I got my D70 last week, having moved up from a Minolta Z1. In my opinion, there is no comparison between the two. I had gotten used to the small size and shape of the Z1, but the D70 looks and feels MUCH better. To me, the right hand grip is just the right size and feel. The Z1 is a pretty fast camera, but the D70 is notably faster--more shots per second, no startup lag, faster AF, you name it. In my first five days with the D70 I did nearly 2,500 shots and was ready for more--neck wasn't sore so camera must not be too heavy. :lol:

Another nice difference is the viewfinder. I don't know what the A2 has, but on the Z1 the viewfinder blacks out between shots, making sport shooting extremely difficult. No so with the D70. Of course, one of the biggest advantages with the D70 is lower noise levels--I shot Champ Cars at Portland Sunday with ISO either 800 or 1000, shutter speed at 1/800 and got many great shots. I believe a shot is still up at www.insidetrackmagazine.comfrom that race. In short, I'm glad I switched to the D70. :-)
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Old Jun 24, 2004, 7:12 AM   #7
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I think the EVF on the A2 is supposed be revolutionary, in that it holds more than 4 times as manypixels than standard EVF's (200,000 standard A2 has 800,000 i think)though I find it difficult to believe that this will be better than a genuine optical viewfinder like on a DSLR.

If sports shooting is the intended use, despite useful features like anti-shake lens, I don't think any of the 8mp prosumers are really fast enough to be considered sports cameras. (in terms of both fps and shutter lag/start up)

Nice shot by the way MurphyC on that insidetrack website :-) What lens did you use ?

Jim
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Old Jun 25, 2004, 12:53 AM   #8
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Thanks Jim! I had on my camera most of the weekend my Sigma 70-300 APO Super Macro II. Worked out pretty well, got a lot of great pics around the tracks.
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Old Aug 20, 2004, 7:51 AM   #9
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http://65.54.186.250/cgi-bin/linkrd?...37%26c%3dUL655

:roll:
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Old Aug 21, 2004, 4:13 AM   #10
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Your link contains all of the crap that MSN/Hotmail puts in front of links to get them to appears in an iframe instead of a window by themselves.

Clicking on that link brings me to an MSN page saying that the email the link came from has been inactive for a while and the link is no-longer valid..

I went to the website
http://www.crutchfieldadvisor.com

That made up part of the link, but couldn't work out exactly what you were trying to quote..

PW
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