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Old Jul 23, 2004, 9:13 PM   #1
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Dear experts, this is my first posting. I have to say I love the pictures I am getting from my D70. It has taken a while to get the pictures I wanted. I have read the manual over and over. My first pictures were out of focus at times. The manual really does have a purpose. Can you explain why when I use spot metering my pictures look better than matrix. They seem more in focus. I know that does not make sense since I thought metering involved how the camera picks up the light from the determined area. Also, I read that matrix metering should not be used with exposure compensation. Thank you for your advice. The journey has been fun.

Nadia
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Old Jul 23, 2004, 11:38 PM   #2
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I'm not an expert with Nikon equipment, but I'll give what guesses I can.

First off, congrats on the D70. From all I hear, its a nice camera. I'm glad you're enjoying it.

The usual problem with out of focus images is actually not that they are out of focus. It's that they are slightly blurry. The human eye can see in very low light. Much lower light than a camera. So while you think "there is enough light for this shot" there isn't. That results in the camera using a very slow shutter speed to get the picture... and that makes camera shake a problem. If the shutter speed is too low, you won't be able to hand hold the camera because you'll move (even just a tiny bit) and it will blur the image.

To prove this theory you can either post an example of one of your photos or at least tell us the shutter speed, ISO, f-stop and focal length of a shot that didn't come out right.

The metering mode might effect this because it might pick a better (faster) shutter speed than in anothe mode. For example, using spot metering it might not notice that there is a really light background. It might only detect a person in a black shirt. If you used matrix metering, it would take into account the lighter background and increase the shutter speed. That would reduce camera shake and give you a sharper picture.

I know little about matrix metering. My guess is that it picks the metering based on breaking the scene into a matrix of sections and then it meters each section. Then it looks up in internal tables for what is the proper metering for a scene which has those values. If done correctly, it should take into account situations where you would normally use exposure compensation. If it is done correctly is the question.

I hope that helps, I'm sure others will chime in and correct me where I'm wrong.

Eric
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Old Jul 24, 2004, 9:33 AM   #3
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Thank you Eric, I think you did explain to me what I suspected. This camera for sure is not a point and shoot. I am learning that light can make or ruin a picture. Since I added the speed light the problem of blurrydoes not occur as much. I have played with the shutter priority, something new on my list of experiments!!

Again thank you for your response.:|

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Old Jul 24, 2004, 10:36 AM   #4
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Aperture and Shutter priority modes are great. I hardly ever leave them (basically only for flash usage, and not always even this. But for simple flash shots, program is so easy.)

Glad I could help.

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