Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 23, 2004, 3:57 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
convergent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 29
Default

Could someone recommend a good filter to put on the D70 18-70 kit lense ... primarily to protect the glass?

Also, does Nikon make a hood for that lense? If so, what is the part number?



Thanks.
convergent is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 23, 2004, 4:00 PM   #2
Junior Member
 
convergent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 29
Default

Well, I just answered part of it myself... it comes with a hood... duh.

The filter size is 67mm.
convergent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 23, 2004, 7:08 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Onyx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 402
Default

Filters for "protection" include UV, Skylight, and Nikon recommended neutral colour NC. The lens vignettes all by itself at wider angles, so getting thin filters are IMO a waste of money, since you're not going to eliminate the vignetting in any case...
Onyx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 23, 2004, 10:31 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Nadia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 300
Default

I was taking pictures outside and it was a very bright day. I did not use my hood and noticed what looks like water stains near Sponge Bob's mouth. I hope this is not dust. Is it a reflection? It happended on one other picture. I was pointingthe lens toward the sky for both of the pictures. I took other pictures toward the sky and did not see this. I think from now on I will use the hood, even though it is bulky.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Thanks,

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Nadia
Attached Images
 
Nadia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 24, 2004, 1:50 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Onyx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 402
Default

Nadia, that's exactly the kind of flaring that the hood is meant to reduce. If you look closely enough at the "blobs", you'll see they are heptagonally shaped, corresponding to the 7 aperture blades in the lens...

This "flaw" can be deliberately used in sunsets to create unique photographic effects too.
Onyx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 24, 2004, 4:08 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
cameranserai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 548
Default

To put it bluntly, buy a U/V or skylight NOW before the unforseen accident occurs and you regret the delay! I have used Hoya filters for many years since they are a proprietary brand and much cheaper than Nikon's own filters. You might also like to consider a polariser for sunny days. Use the lens hood except when you are using the built in flash - you'll get a half moon shadow at the bottom of each picture caused by the hood cutting off the flash! As Onyx explained, the blobs are really the result of sunlight flaring in the lens, and this is often used on TV deliberately. That's what the hood is there to avoid!
cameranserai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 24, 2004, 8:25 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
sdmackie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 14
Default

That depends:

Most use a skylight filter, which protects thelens and gives a warmer look to your pictures. It will also reduce UV (ultraviolet light) in your pictures. If you mainly take portraits/people pictures, this may be your best choice.

A UV filter will protect the lens and give a blueish (cool) cast to your pictures. It does a better job at cutting down the UV than the skylight. I used to use these filters as I do most outdoor pictures and reducing UV was most important to me.

Now, many photographers argue that to put a cheap filter on your expensive lens worsens the quality of your picture. It does, and I no longer use any type of filter unless I need to (color filter, neutral density, polarizer). I am pretty careful with my equipment and have yet to scratch any lens.

If you want the protection of a filter, I would recommend you get a good filter (ie. expensive) to put on your lens. Spend as much as you can to keep your pictures sharp. I would talk to your neighbourhood photography store to see what they have in stock/would recommend. HOYA is ok, B+W is a leader in filters. A good website is

http://www.2filter.com/prices/digcam.html

If there is a lens I would recommend, it would be a circular polarizer to reduce glare and darken/saturate your pictures. I normally use one in the summer with the bright sun. It won't work as a filter to protect your lens but it does wondersfor your pictures!

Take care and have fun!

Stephen

ps. I have the NIKON hood for that lens, not sure of the part number though.


sdmackie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 25, 2004, 11:25 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Nadia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 300
Default

Onyx wrote:
Quote:
Nadia, that's exactly the kind of flaring that the hood is meant to reduce. If you look closely enough at the "blobs", you'll see they are heptagonally shaped, corresponding to the 7 aperture blades in the lens...

This "flaw" can be deliberately used in sunsets to create unique photographic effects too.
Hi Onyx,

I am glad that you are telling me it is not dirt but flaring. I learned a lesson since this was my first time taking so many pictures at an outside event. It was so bright and a professional photographer was there and told me to put my flash on to help with the shadows. When I purchased the camera the gentlemantold to always use the hood and I did not. So I will do that next time. I guess the effect was nice since sponge bob lives under water, those could be air bubbles. HaHa.:-)

Thanks,
Nadia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 25, 2004, 12:08 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Nadia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 300
Default

cameranserai wrote:
Quote:
To put it bluntly, buy a U/V or skylight NOW before the unforseen accident occurs and you regret the delay! I have used Hoya filters for many years since they are a proprietary brand and much cheaper than Nikon's own filters. You might also like to consider a polariser for sunny days. Use the lens hood except when you are using the built in flash - you'll get a half moon shadow at the bottom of each picture caused by the hood cutting off the flash! As Onyx explained, the blobs are really the result of sunlight flaring in the lens, and this is often used on TV deliberately. That's what the hood is there to avoid!
Hi Cameranserai,

Thank you so much for your advice. I looked to see what type of filter cover I was sold since I was looking for just protection, having no clue about UV and Skylight. He sold me Quantaray brand filter which is MC Skylight 1A multi coated DMC, I paid $24.99. Trust me Iwill pay more to get good pictures. I am going shopping and it seems like everyone likes Hoya filters. I may end up with a filter for indoors and one for outside. Oh boy, I ended up using the flash to reduce shadows, so with the hood I might have ended up with the half moons, which I did see when I first go the camera and was experimenting.


Nadia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 25, 2004, 12:22 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Nadia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 300
Default

sdmackie wrote:
Quote:
That depends:

Most use a skylight filter, which protects thelens and gives a warmer look to your pictures. It will also reduce UV (ultraviolet light) in your pictures. If you mainly take portraits/people pictures, this may be your best choice.

A UV filter will protect the lens and give a blueish (cool) cast to your pictures. It does a better job at cutting down the UV than the skylight. I used to use these filters as I do most outdoor pictures and reducing UV was most important to me.

Now, many photographers argue that to put a cheap filter on your expensive lens worsens the quality of your picture. It does, and I no longer use any type of filter unless I need to (color filter, neutral density, polarizer). I am pretty careful with my equipment and have yet to scratch any lens.

If you want the protection of a filter, I would recommend you get a good filter (ie. expensive) to put on your lens. Spend as much as you can to keep your pictures sharp. I would talk to your neighbourhood photography store to see what they have in stock/would recommend. HOYA is ok, B+W is a leader in filters. A good website is

http://www.2filter.com/prices/digcam.html

If there is a lens I would recommend, it would be a circular polarizer to reduce glare and darken/saturate your pictures. I normally use one in the summer with the bright sun. It won't work as a filter to protect your lens but it does wondersfor your pictures!

Take care and have fun!

Stephen

ps. I have the NIKON hood for that lens, not sure of the part number though.

Hi Stephen,

I am very happy with all the answers I received. I think I will purchase a good lens for the indoors, better than theSkylight I have, by Quantaray and get a good circular polarizer for the bright sunny days. You have been more than helpful. And, yes I am having fun especially with all the great experts helping me with my problems.

Thanks,

Nadia
Nadia is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:13 AM.