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Old Oct 21, 2004, 1:26 PM   #1
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Before I forget is should say my camera is a Nikon D100.

I'm a novice at all this so when I bought a lens I took the suggestion on the salesperson and purchased a UV filter to protect the lens. Other than a polarizer this is the only filter I have so it's used outdoors day and night and indoors.

I don't think I have any problems with the outdoor shots, (I'm color blind so if the grass isn't quite the right shade of green I don't necessarily see it), but the indoor shots usually need a lot of help from Photoshop.

The indoor shots are being taken in the "Program" mode with everything at the factory settings and I try not to use the flash. Much of the time skin tones seem to come out with what I see as a yellowish ā€“ orangeish tint.

Now I'm seeing there are Skylight filters and Clear filters. The write-ups for Skylight filters start to boggle my mind ā€“ there are various types but they seem to have same outdoor effect ā€“ but they all have a light pink color. :?

I'm beginning to feel I should get a clear filter and then work from there.

There's a lot of knowledge on this site and I would like to ask for suggestions on what would be the most practicable "protection filter" to have.

Thanks,
Pat
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Old Oct 22, 2004, 3:30 AM   #2
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You have already bought a UV filter so there is really no need to buy anything else to protect the lens. For sunny days you should buy yourself a polariser filter - to give an example look at a holiday brochure and see how blue the sky always is, that is the effect of the filter. Like polaroid sunglasses it also cuts out the glare. You'll see a considerable difference in the quality of the image. Changing the U/V for a skylight might give a slightly warmer tone too.

The yellow "sepiaish" tone to your indoor photos is because you aren't using flash. If it is at events where flash is forbidden you need a better lens - there are many posts in the lens section on this for reference purposes. If permitted - turn it on, but don't leave the lens hood on or you'll get a half moon shadow at the base of each photo caused by the shadow of the lens hood. I know from experience!

Nice camera you have. Enjoy.
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Old Oct 30, 2004, 9:26 PM   #3
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You have a great camera with a decent UV filter. I don't use filters unless I need to manipulate a photo (colour, polarizor, etc...) A UV filter is great at protecting your lens.

you can change the white balance to change your color casts, or do it on the computer if your shooting raw images.



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Old Nov 2, 2004, 5:29 AM   #4
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The yellow-to-amber coloration you're seeing is probably the result of incandescent light. If people turn a sickly green, it may be due to fluourescent light. You can correct some of these color problems by using filters. A good filter resource is here:
http://www.2filter.com/faq/filterfaq.html


Filters can go on the camera lens and also on the flash. I know of one photographer (at the US Senate) that uses a green gel over her flash - the resulting light dovetails nicely with the garish fluourescent lights in the Senate conference rooms, and she can fix the color easily in Photoshop.



You might also try using GE "Reveal" light bulbs, which produce a color spectrum that is more like daylight. Also, if you use strobes, you will find the color to be better because the light output of the strobe will overwhelm the lightbulbs with a more "daylight-balanced" color spectrum.



I enjoy the effects of filters, but you might not need them if color correction is your goal. Look into the "white balance" information for your camera. The answer may be in there.
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Old Nov 2, 2004, 8:15 AM   #5
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Thanks for info, Paseur - you're right - most of my color problems seemed to be in the office under fluorescent lighting. Last Friday at work I took a bunch of pics of staff, it was a "Crazy Daze" fund raiser. I tried bouncing the flash off the ceiling and "olay" - decent colors. Luckily the ceiling isa neutral color. A great opportunity to practice.

At the next opportunity I'll try the green gel on the flash - practice and learn, right? :idea:

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Old Nov 2, 2004, 11:27 AM   #6
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I don't think you "get it."

White balance is selected with film camera's by using specific film.

White balance with digital is done by selecting the corresponding setting.

What is White?

Under different lights, white varies. You don't NEED a filter or a gel - you have to set the white balance properly so that the camera KNOWS what white is.

If you shoot RAW, you can do this later in the computer, if you don't shoot RAW, then set the white balance in the camera. Once the camera "knows" what "white" is, it will compensate for the type of lighting.

Dave
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Old Nov 3, 2004, 11:19 PM   #7
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Thanks for elaborating dbb!



I am sure he will get it now. :-)



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