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Old Oct 31, 2004, 7:38 PM   #1
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The new Nikon 8800 is the next camera that I am thinking of purchasing. Does anybody know if this camera would qualify as a professional use camera, or should I consider a camera with interchangable lenses.


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Old Nov 2, 2004, 11:58 AM   #2
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The Nikon 8800 would not be considered a"pro" camera. That's not to say you can'tproduce "pro" quality photos using it. I now shoot with a Nikon D70, and most folk don't consider it a "pro" camera. I've shot some very nice photos with the D70, and I've captured some unusable photos also. But I've also captured some very nice photos with my old Olympus C2040 2 megapixel camera and my Kodak 6490 4 megapixel camera. I believe "pro" is way overused. The person behind the camera makes or breaks a good photo. Bottom line...just have fun with photography. Woody
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Old Nov 4, 2004, 11:30 AM   #3
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If you want to go pro (to submit your pictures to sites for sale), I've heard you need to have at least 11 mp.
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Old Nov 4, 2004, 11:18 PM   #4
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Thanks Woody,

I appreciate the imput. Some of my concerns while considering the Nikon 8800 is all the features it has for the money. There seems to be a down side that I can't see at this point.

LOU
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Old Nov 4, 2004, 11:29 PM   #5
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Suzupis,

Where can you get a 11mp camera?

actually I am doing weddings on the side, and I am looking for a bettery quality before I become more aggressive in my venture.

Lou
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Old Nov 5, 2004, 12:55 AM   #6
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Lou III wrote:
Quote:
Some of my concerns while considering the Nikon 8800 is all the features it has for the money. There seems to be a down side that I can't see at this point.
Some Downsides:

It will probably have very highnoise (similar to film grain) as ISO speeds are increased (the 8MP modelsusing a2/3" CCD don't tend to do well at anything much above the lowest ISO speed settings). This is because of the tiny size of the sensor (or to be more accurate, the tiny size of the photosites for each pixel, since they are packing so many into a very small sensor).Since the smaller photosites generate a weaker signal, the signal requires more amplification for equivalent sensitivity to light. This also amplifies noise (like turning up the volume on a weak radio station with static).

For wedding use, this would be a big problem in some environments if you can't use a flash(because you'd want to increase ISO speeds to get shutter speeds up fast enough to reduce motion blur, and non-DSLR models have a limited ISO range with higher ISO speeds being virtually unusable)

One other thing to consider is your ability to control Depth of Field via Aperture. With a non-DSLR model, it can be difficult to make a subject stand out from a background by using a larger aperture.Depth of Field is based on Aperture, Focus Distance and Focal Length -- but it's based on Actual (not 35mm equivalent) focal length.

As a result, due to the short focal length on a model like the Nikon CP 8800, you have much greater depth of field for any given 35mm equivalent focal length and aperture (making it very difficult to blur backgrounds for decent portraits). The actual focal length of the lens on the CP 8800 is only 8.9 to 89mm, to give it a 35mm equivalent focal length of 35-350mm.

Speed of Operation is another factor. As a general rule, the non-DSLR models are much slower (autofocus time/reliability, cycle times between photos, etc.). So, this could hender it's use in some environments.

You are also forced to use an EVF (Electronic Viewfinder) with a model like the Coolpix 8800, and quality varies a lot between models using this type of viewfinder. Some don'tgain up well enough to see in lower light, not to mention the inherent delay you have in the image reaching the EVF. EVF's also tend to blank out between photos (making it difficult to follow moving subjects.

Quote:
Where can you get a 11mp camera?
You don't need one unless you're printing to larger sizes(and you can probablyinterpolate to meet submission standards with some companies that have them). But, since you asked:

Canon EOS-1Ds - 11 Megapixels

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II - 16.6 Megapixels

Kodak DCS-14N, DCS SLR/C, DCS SLR/N - 13.5 Megapixels.Note that these Kodaks don't do very well from a noise perspective in lower light.
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Old Nov 5, 2004, 2:03 PM   #7
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To quote from webshots, a place where I had hoped to submit pictures from my 8800:

Specifications - Digital Files

Although we prefer slides, we do accept digital submissions on CD-ROM. Please note that we require a final resolution of 5400x3600 @ 300 dpi. Few digital cameras are capable of reaching a resolution that high, but Webshots will consider images taken with cameras 11 megapixels and higher. Please save the images in .jpg format at high quality level 10 (if saving in Photoshop).


How would I interpolate?




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Old Nov 5, 2004, 2:26 PM   #8
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There are numerous packages capable of interpolating images.

If I were going to try and submit something, I'd first crop to a 3:2 Aspect Ratio (unless you are already shooting in that mode).

With an 8800, that would equate to an image size of3274 x 2176

Then, I'd use one of the popular tools to interpolate to the resolution they wanted (5400 x 3600, which is also a 3:2 Aspect Ratio). This works out to 19.44 Megapixels.

Lanczos is one popular tool. Irfanview includes the Lanczos interpolation algorithm (and it's free). You can download it from http://www.irfanview.com (you will find the resize options under Image, Resize/Resample). Make sure to download the free plugins, too.

You may also want to take a look a PhotoZoom Pro (formerly S-Spline Pro):

http://www.trulyphotomagic.com/shortcut/site/content.php?page=ourproducts&section=product_s erie_info&cat

Fred Miranda has a popular plugin known as stairstep interpolation, too (basically, it's using bicubic, upsizing in steps of 10% each). Another popular interpolation option is Genuine Fractals.

After interpolation,I'd make sure that all EXIF information was removed from the photo (so that they would not have a way to tell what camera took the photo). Personally, I think the image quality should stand on it's own. So, if they think it's good enough without knowing what camera took it, then why tell them and risk having it turned down? Anyway, that's the way I would handle it.

Ifyou uncheck "retain EXIF" with Irfanview, it will automatically remove it when you use the Save As option after editing an image (so, no EXIF information will remain).

Here is a recent forum thread, discussing the same problem. A forum member took a photo with a 3 Megapixel Camera, and the editor told her that the resolution wasn't high enough:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=78

Personally, I use Lanczos when I have a need for interpolation (for example, when I need an 8x10" print from an image that has been heavily cropped). But, I'll admit that PhotoZoom (formerly S-Spline Pro) looks interesting. I saw a recent comparison showing a variety of interpolation methods, and I was impressed at the sharpness it maintained (but I haven't tried it yet personally).



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Old Nov 5, 2004, 3:56 PM   #9
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Thanks! I have a friend who wants to blow up one of my pictures to poster size or larger. Sounds like interpolation will help.
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Old Nov 6, 2004, 8:18 AM   #10
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Well, This is My third successfull Wedding I shot using only a Nikon D100 with a 24/120"VR" zoom lens and a SB-28DX flash on a STROBOFRAME flash bracket. Not one picture out of 221 taken could NOT be printed to perfection. Another huge success story for Me. I love this set-up for everything I shoot. Just remember to turn off the "VR" function on the lens if You use a tripod.(I don't use a tripod anymore) (No need with the "VR") I was trying to use an 8700 but the Viewfinder sucks due to it does not recover fast enough for quick shots like Bridsmaids walking down the Isle Etc. It took great pictures but the viewfinder was a huge drawback on the 8700. Noise was not the problem in real world photography.If they would have used a regular viewfinder like they had on the 990 on the 8800 it would probably be the perfect Camera. Nikon people that design these cameras must not really use them or they would dump the electronic viewfinders forever.
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