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Old Jan 6, 2005, 11:53 AM   #11
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Wait a minute - plastic body is as hard as most metal so toss that one out. The important internal framework is metal.

ISO 200 - the only reason for slow ISO speeds in the old days of film and in digital point-and-shoots was to get great color and no grain. The D70 gives such great results at ISO 200 there is no need for the older, slower speeds like ISO 100, 50, 25.

the lenses I really want are expensive I
m not sure that is the camera's fault

no battery grip ummm LOL is that a problem for more people?

Mode dial gets inadvertently changed easily I have heard of this but it's never happened to me!

strap is narrow buy a new one - last thing I want is to advertise I have a Nikon anyway.

USB interface is slow I think this is true on all cameras and you should buy a compactFlash any way.
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Old Jan 6, 2005, 2:16 PM   #12
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Grinder wrote:
Quote:
ISO 200 - the only reason for slow ISO speeds in the old days of film and in digital point-and-shoots was to get great color and no grain. The D70 gives such great results at ISO 200 there is no need for the older, slower speeds like ISO 100, 50, 25.
hey. I read that quote in a review some time ago.
But I guess it's right.

However, I purchased a D70 also, although there're some cons which I am aware of. But I think every cam has its advantages and also disadvantages. You just need to know them and also how to handle them.
I think I'm going to have a lot of fun with it. I'm just used to a 2MP p&s cam (canon a60) and there are worlds between these two cams.
Looking forward to its arrival tomorrow or on saturday.
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Old Jan 6, 2005, 4:16 PM   #13
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Most guys decide to marry their wives because shes beautifu andshedont mind the fact you drive a cavalier:G. Welllater on when you find out her left big toe is crooked, or she has a cavity, or hereyes be puffy in the morning, do you then think about devorcing her because of those cons, or do you think about all the money you're saving because it wasnt because you were driving a Mercedes that she was willing to marry you.

I got a D70, and I love that camera. And I refuse to be discouraged even if the cameras left bigtoe is crooked or all of the other yada, yada, yada:G
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Old Jan 6, 2005, 4:46 PM   #14
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I just received my D70 yesterday, and I think it is one fine piece of machinery!!

Guess I haven't had it long enough to find that crooked toe!!!! lol
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Old Jan 6, 2005, 5:01 PM   #15
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Actually, I was just regurgitating some of the criticisms I've heard from others to make the point that it doesn't have to be perfect to be a good choice. It can (and does) have flaws that for some people are serious. However, for me, it's a great camera.

Wait a minute - plastic body is as hard as most metal so toss that one out. The important internal framework is metal. Uh, tell that to the lady that had the lens fall off, mount and all. Might have been a manufacturing defect, but I've not heard that it wasn't just too big a lens for the camera. I believe it was the 70-200VR. Pretty scary when you consider your more concerned about the lens than the camera. I wrote to Nikon Tech Support about this. They chose not to respond. I'm not sure what that means.

ISO 200 - the only reason for slow ISO speeds in the old days of film and in digital point-and-shoots was to get great color and no grain. The D70 gives such great results at ISO 200 there is no need for the older, slower speeds like ISO 100, 50, 25. And yet, maybe if they had supplied the slower ISO settings, they could have eliminated the one main photographic criticism (that I've still not seen from mine), the moire.

the lenses I really want are expensive I'm not sure that is the camera's fault... And yet, one could argue that an advantage of buying Canon is that the lenses tend to be less expensive. A flaw doesn't have to be absolute, it can be relative to the marketplace.

no battery grip ummm LOL is that a problem for more people? Not for me. But a lot of "pros" like the vertical grip they get with their F-whatevers.

Mode dial gets inadvertently changed easily I have heard of this but it's never happened to me! I didn't think much of this one either, until it happened to me.

strap is narrow buy a new one - last thing I want is to advertise I have a Nikon anyway. I did buy another. But apparently, the nice wide strap I could get for my Canon A-1 isn't really available, at least not in the two camera shops I've been in. The mount has changed so the old style won't mount. Just a nit.

USB interface is slow I think this is true on all cameras and you should buy a compactFlash any way. Not all. There are cameras with USB2.0 and FireWire connections. I have Compact Flash cards. I also have 2 Compact Flash readers. The problem is the camera's, not mine.


I love my D70. I'm convinced I made the correct decision in purchasing it. But, instead of burying my head in the sand, I acknowledge the flaws and consider them in the purchase decision. None of these flaws were great enough to prevent me from buying the camera. Why not? Because there are so many, overriding great things about the camera that the flaws did not matter to me.

Cheers, Eric

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Old Jan 6, 2005, 9:46 PM   #16
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Eric, I'm willing to live with all those faults. If I were to find a "perfect" camera for me, I would have to custom make a camera...I'm sure I can find a few things wrong with even a $10,000 camera. But thanks for pointing those out, be it your opinion or others'.

And bern888, well put! I agree with what you're saying.

As for the ISO being 200, I didn't see any noise in both night shots or day time shots using the D70. And, I never take night shots without an external flash.

So far, apart from the ability to lock the mirror which I doubt I'll ever need, I don't see any decision changing points.

Thank you all. And if there are more opinions, please keep them coming


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Old Jan 10, 2005, 10:29 AM   #17
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I just remembered another item that bothers me, though I suspect that most consumer AF cameras have the same problem. No split prism. My eyes aren't what they once were, so manually focusing a low contrast image is not easy. Pulled out my old Canon A-1. Man is that easy to focus.

Cheers, Eric
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Old Jan 11, 2005, 12:26 PM   #18
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Guys! shoot RAW and you'll find that in most (99%) of instances, Moire can be corrected. This is an issue with even Medium Format Digital backs and not on just DSLRs. This is a technical issue - moire happens when there's detail in the frame that just happens to fall exactly at the same place as that on the sensor's Horz/Vertical rows. Most manufacturers choose to implement a Moire removal function in their Editing software.
D70 is a great camera and if used correctly, can rival images produced by Medium Format film cameras. I have both formats and D70 surpasses the detail captured compared to Medium Format (Hasselblad included).
There is one serious CON though - highlights are not rendered as smoothly as on film cameras. Once again this is an issue with ALL digital cameras/backs. As a viable solution, try to expose for the highlights if you are MORE interested in getting enough detail in the highlights or if the picture call for it. Just like transparencies (though blown highlights in Digital files are not as good as those in film, but then if the highlights are blown then .....)
Learn the medium first before you pick on the small(inconsequential) details.
Bye and happy shooting.
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 5:19 PM   #19
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Grinder,
Great candle photo- what lense did you use?
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 2:05 AM   #20
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I think at the end of the day, generally, you will get what you pay for. In this case, the consumer is getting the much better end of the deal - particularly in light of its competitors.

As far as all the criticisms that have been made of the camera, I'd say a majority are true, but we're not talkin' D2Xs or Hasselblads here... we're talkin' a AU$2000 DSLR. It's as simple as that, in my opinion. Gor for it!!
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