Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 13, 2005, 10:19 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 13
Default

Hi, I just recently purchased a Nikon D70 and will be using a 20-80 mm lens with a 512 mb memory card. What I'm looking for are some help for taking good action photos as I love to take pictures of sports like: skateboarding, skimboarding, surfing, any motorsports and little cousin's that can't sit still for a picture. I'm used to a simple Fuji 3800 so this will be a big step up for me and was hoping someone could help me out.

Thanks for any help, I greatly appreciate it
Dustin_Hart_AM is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 14, 2005, 9:44 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

Can you tell me what settings you're using? Both in the camera mode (sport mode, program mode, Aperture Priority, whatever) and what aperture, shutter speed, and ISO.

Generally, you need a fairly high shutter speed to stop action. It all depends on how fast the subject is moving (of course) but at least 1/500 or so is probably required. To get the entire subject in focus you'll need a larger Depth of Field. To get that you need a larger aperture, f5.6 or maybe even higher. but other things effect DOF beyond just aperture (like distance to the subject.)

What is wrong with the shots you get now? Could you post an example? This might help too.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 1:21 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 13
Default

I guess it'd be good to have the cam and fool around with it. I had just about purchased a D70 from Royal Camera but they failed to mention that they were selling me a "Overseas version" and that it would cost $800 to get one in english. I guess what I'm looking for is some prelimanary help is what I'm trying to say.
Dustin_Hart_AM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 3:14 PM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Dustin_Hart_AM wrote:
Quote:
I guess it'd be good to have the cam and fool around with it. I had just about purchased a D70 from Royal Camera but they failed to mention that they were selling me a "Overseas version" and that it would cost $800 to get one in english. I guess what I'm looking for is some prelimanary help is what I'm trying to say.
Nikon U.S. will not service a grey market camera (one not intended for sale in the region you are in), even if you are willing to pay them for the service.BTW, I wouldn't trust any of the 3rd party warranties to be able to fix your camera.

It's very competitive now, so if a price looks too good to be true, it probably is.

There are a lot of scam artists aroundwith very nice looking web sites (and most are located in Brooklyn --operating under multiple business names).

Most of these dealers won't sell you a camera for the advertised price, unless you agree to buy lots of addons at inflated prices (memory cards, extended warranties, batteries, etc.).

These typesof dealerstypically call you to "confirm" your order, and then the sales pitch begins. If you refuse to buy the overpriced addons, then they'll probably refuse to ship it to you (or it will suddenly become backordered -- even though the web site says it's in stock).

Sometimes, they'llship you a partial order with high unauthorized shipping and insurance tacked on, and when you try to return it and dispute it with your credit card company, they'll try to keep the shipping and insurance, as well as a restocking fee, since the restocking fees are displayed in the policies on their web site.

I'd make sure to ask about any dealer you are considering here first.

Always check out a vendor's reputation using http://www.resellerratings.com(avoiding vendors with a small number of reviews, since some have been known to pad their own ratings).

Here are customer reviews for Royal Camera (less than 100 reviews):

http://www.resellerratings.com/seller1895.html


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 3:31 PM   #5
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

P.S.

As far as answering your questions about settings, it would depend on the amount of light you have what you'd want to do.

You may want to visityour local library and get a book on basic photography to give you a better idea how light levels, aperture,shutter speed and ISO speed impact exposure. You don't need one that's specific to digital cameras (as the same principals apply to both film and digital).

You'll also want to learn what impacts Depth of Field (since using a larger aperture for faster shutter speeds gives you a shallower depth of field). You'll need to find the best balance of settings for the conditions you're shooting in for best results.

I wouldn't worry about the details too much, and start using it right away. This model will be dramatically more responsive compared to your old Fuji -- even without anything other than full auto settings. ;-)

BTW, the D70 does have some scene modes, including a Sports Mode, that you may find useful. In most cases, this type of mode simply sets the camera to use a larger aperture (represented by a smaller f/stop number), so that the camera uses faster shutter speeds.

But, I'm not familiar with it's behavior as far as how high it boosts ISO speed in this mode if you leave it set to Auto ISO, etc. (and you don't want to use any higher ISO speed than needed for the lighting conditions you're shooting in).

Your best bet in getting tips for this model is probably in our Nikon Digital SLR Forum.

I'll move this thread there for you now, where you'll find Nikon DSLR users that can give you model specific information.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 5:31 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
terry@softreq.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,539
Default

I use 1/500th of a second, shutter priority, for people running and jumping.

To avoid shutter lag, I prefocus my shot. I focus on a spot on the floor where the person will be, then hold the shutter half way down. When the person runs into the frame, I then click the shutter. Because I've already prefocused the shot, there is minimal shutter lag when I press the shutter at the exact moment I want.

Another thing to keep in mind is using a flash, either the one already built into your camera or buying an external one. With a flash, you can keep a high shutter speed without having to worry if there is enough light to take the shot.

When I use flash, I use 1/1000 second shutter speed, and shoot wide open (F2.8 on my camera). I set the flash on automatic for the correct asa, shutter speed and aperture.

Also, I shoot a sports picture zoomed out wide, then I crop the shot down after using software. That way, I'm more likely to keep the subject totally in frame.

If your a beginner, the above probably sounds technical. If you try out the ideas above, you will learn why they are useful techniques.
terry@softreq.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2005, 1:51 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 13
Default

Thanks for the advice guys. I probably should take a trip to the local library and check out some books. The conditions I'll be shooting in the near future of will be mostly small hockey arena's and/or coliseums. I'll be relatively close to the action at these events so I was thinking maybe a 28-80 mm lens. BTW Resellerratings has been a savior for me. I had checked out another site and thought I should do more research on them and found out they were a total scam too. (guess I better watch myself) It'll be hard parting with my old Fuji, it took such great shots. I attached a shot of what the usual conditions are for me in the arenas.
Attached Images
 
Dustin_Hart_AM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 22, 2005, 9:01 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Khaled J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 10
Default

I have anothertechnique;I trained myself in 'moving the camera along with the moving object'.
I used manual focussing, set to "Infinity" and used as much Tele as possible. Most important is to keep moving the camera when taking the shot. It's a kind of 'unnatural' .The results for such a techniqueare not bad. Themoving object will besharpwith a blurredbackground, just what I want. It's not that difficult, just need a lot of practice.
Khaled J is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:00 PM.