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Old Jan 20, 2005, 6:58 PM   #1
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Hi,

I just got a D70 last week. It's great although the weather and a cold have kept me from using it that much yet. I'm interested in getting a 70-300G or possibly a used 70-210D. I'm just moving over from P&S. How much magnification do these lenses provide, 10x, 25x? Could someone tell me the formula for this formula for this.

Thanks,

Rich
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Old Jan 20, 2005, 7:22 PM   #2
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The X factor from the P&S world is a pretty meaningless number created for marketing purposes:-)

It is derived by dividing the max focal length by the minimum focal length of a lens.

So the 70-300 is a 4x zoom and the 70-200 is a 3x zoom. But that doesn't tell you anything because a 28-105 is a 3.75x zoom and the 28-135 is a 4.8x zoom Much shorter lens than the 70-300 but the x factor is bigger :-). Plain marketing hype from the P&S sales teams that sounds good but doesn't tell you very much.

A 35mm lens on the D70 gives you approximately the same angle of view as the human eye.

Peter.


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Old Jan 20, 2005, 7:30 PM   #3
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Rich,

You must also factor in that your D70 has a multiple of 1.5. So a 300mm lens would actually give you the effect of 450mm in the 35mm SLR film world. Look at your P&S and you should find somewhere the focal length of the lens. Then you can compare it to slr lenses.

Bud
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Old Jan 21, 2005, 12:33 PM   #4
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Difficult to do because of the huge crop factor on P&S, the average P&S lens is around the 5mm-30mm'ish range. But gives effective 35mm focal lengths of 30mm-xx mm.

You might trygoogleing"lens angle of view" to get an ideaof what each focallengthsees. (remember to adjust for your cameras crop factor).

You did not say what your indended use was, but for birding 300 to 600 and longer is good. The minimum for birding is 300 and you need to be real close (10-20 feet) to the bird the get a good sized image. For larger wildlife 300mm to 400mm works OK.

Peter.

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Old Jan 21, 2005, 4:05 PM   #5
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Here's a graphic by Klaus_DK which will give you an idea of what the focal length means:



Also read this: http://www.hertz-ladiges.com/modules...howpage&pid=63
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