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Old Mar 8, 2005, 8:28 AM   #1
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For astrophotography using a Nikon D70 on a tripod and the Nikon ML-L3 wireless remote which would be a better choice for a telephoto zoom lens?

Sigma 70-300mm F4-5.6 APO Macro Super II ($320 Canadian)

Sigma 100-300mm F4.0 EX HSM ($1150 Canadian)

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Old Mar 8, 2005, 1:39 PM   #2
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the sigma 100-300 f4.0 will be the 'better' choice, although you won't get very close with either lens.

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Old Mar 8, 2005, 4:06 PM   #3
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agiaccio wrote:
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For astrophotography using a Nikon D70 on a tripod and the Nikon ML-L3 wireless remote which would be a better choice for a telephoto zoom lens?

A telescope with a lens mount on the eyepiece of course. A 300mm won't even fill the frame with a full moon -- not exactly astrophotography optics by a long shot.

Unless all you are trying to get is spiral star patterns of the open sky.
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Old Mar 8, 2005, 9:01 PM   #4
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Thanks Steve!



I've seen pictures of this setup on the Net but never understood it. The D70 would connect to the eyepiece section via a lens mount adapter but what settings would be used since I assume that the telescope would be used to fiocus (not the D70), correct?



Also, would the D70 simply connect to the eyepiece sectionwith no lens on or is there some special "glass / lens" that would be fitted inside this lens adapter?




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Old Mar 9, 2005, 9:23 AM   #5
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agiaccio wrote:
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Thanks Steve!



I've seen pictures of this setup on the Net but never understood it. The D70 would connect to the eyepiece section via a lens mount adapter but what settings would be used since I assume that the telescope would be used to fiocus (not the D70), correct?



Also, would the D70 simply connect to the eyepiece section with no lens on or is there some special "glass / lens" that would be fitted inside this lens adapter?



the eyepiece won't have the F mount the nikon has, so there must be some kind of adapter.
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Old Apr 17, 2005, 9:53 PM   #6
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If you are connecting to "large" reflectors or Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes like a Celestron you use what is called a "T-ring"...it's a ring that screws on to the visual back of the telescope and has the F-mount on the other side. You then attach the camera directly to the back of the telescope like you would any other lens.

For smaller refracting telscopes (the long skinny ones) you need to have an eye-piece projection set up...the set up the telescope normally and a tube holds the camera the correct distance from the eyepiece. You can also use eye-piece projection on the reflectors...but I prefer the direct mount myself.

I haven't had a chance to put my D70 on my Celestron C-8 yet.

Take a look at the How to section of Sky and Telescope magazine:

http://skyandtelescope.com/howto/imaging/default.asp

There are several articles on astrophotography with just a camera and regular lens as well as with a telescope.






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Old Apr 19, 2005, 6:36 PM   #7
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We can cut to the chase here by having you go to scopetronix.com and you can match your camera to the adapter they recommend. I am using a T-ring that fits my nikon 4500. My camera will still autofocus. With the D70, you would want to use the ScopeTronix MaxView DSLR II with the appropriate T-ring. I am using an Orion XT-10 Scope with my Nikon 4500 and it works really great. I have been able to take some good photos of the moon.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 12:00 AM   #8
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There are camera-specific(usually by brand) T-rings available for this purpose. The telescope, not the camera, becomes the focusing mechanism.I am wondering, though, how well would the D70 perform in this task???

Thanks, Alex
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 7:09 AM   #9
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Just to give you an idea as to magnification, go back to my post on page 5 (27th Feb) and see the photo of the moon taken with an old manual 500mm Nikon. Now that is just the moon, the closest to us, and isn't that detailed even allowing for the fact that in digital terms it becomes a 750mm lens. You'lll certainly need a telescope and adaptor if you are serious about astronomy and photography. Anything less will be a waste of money.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 6:56 PM   #10
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Hi,

Here's an uncropped, resized shot I took with my D70 and a Celestron C5 (could've been a bit sharper but it was terribly cold that night!). The use of a .63 focal reducer turns the C5 into a 1182mm F/6.3 lens figuring in the 1.5 digital magnification factor.



...Ed
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