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Old Mar 12, 2005, 5:29 AM   #11
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I thought it might be useful to revisit my sample photograph.

The levels histogram looks like this on the adjusted photo.


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Old Mar 12, 2005, 5:30 AM   #12
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I'd probaly adjust it to something like this.


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Old Mar 12, 2005, 5:31 AM   #13
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Which gives the final result more contrast. Which you prefer is a matter of taste and my favourite is actually a copy I've converted to black and white. This is losing a bit in the translation. The effect is more pronouced when I view it in photoshop than it is when posted here.
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Old Mar 12, 2005, 2:06 PM   #14
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By moving te sliders in to meet the graph, all your doing is adjusting the highlights and shadows which is the over all exposure which has nothing to do wit WB corrections. http://www.jtgraphics.net/levels.htm



"White Balance and Color Temperature" How ever you can use levels to adjust the Black/White & Gray Point in the phototo fix WB, this is done with the eye dropers to correct for wrong Kelvin Temperature (WB) color cast http://www.jtgraphics.net/correcting_wb.htm

http://www.jtgraphics.net/correcting_color_cast.htm


Heres that same image with WB correction used above then applyed shadow adjusted much better color.
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 3:12 PM   #15
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No need to buy anything to open RAW files from a D70!

A lot of people say that the Nikon View converter plug-in for Photoshop is better than the CS built-in one (you really should not have to buy anything to open a RAW .NEF in Photoshop.)

I however, don't care for the plug-in. Why? There are very few controls compared to the Adobe RAW tool. Seems like the one I used had exposure and minimal color cast corrections and that was it. So, I switched back to the Adobe tool.

Anyway, Photoshop CS version 2 is supposed to be out "real soon now"...it is supposed to have a lot of nice features, like HDR compression and improvements to the 16-bit functions...you probably want to be working in 16-bit anyway, and it looks like PS CS 2 is going to be the tool to use.

Now, if they would only come out with a 64-bit Photoshop, so we panoramists could deal with 500 megapixel stitches... :?
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 4:32 PM   #16
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Thanks Guys,

Just a few more follow up questions after reading all of your insight. I think I have a much better understanding of WB and will need to play around with it so I can understand how it impacts the colors. I tend to shoot a lot of family stuff and 1/2 of its indoors so I will try some of the other WB settings to see what turns out best. Other input I would like to get.

1. UnderExposure: It seems that a lot of the indoor shotsI take with the built in flash (D70) are underexposed and require meto lighten them up by moving the far right level inward to the left (photoshop).

- My question is,Is the D70 flash too weak for indoor family shots or do you think I have some setting wrong with the camera? I have used the camerapretty much on auto. I looked at many of the indoor pics (see below pic) and this is very typical. I do have an SB800 on my N90S.

2. Photoshop Level: If I move the middle level in photoshop to lighten the image, am I removing or harming my image? Some of the pictures seem to look better when I lighten the image using the middle level in photoshop?

2. File Type: Even thought I am a rookie am I best to save the images raw and then work with them? Currently, I am saving these imagesas JPG.

3. Saving Files Photoshop: When I save them in Photoshop they ask me what resolutionto save them and I always say Maximum (Is this correct)?

4. Color Adjustmetns: Is there a tool in Photoshop that impacts the colors like WB? I see color balance and other tools but have not used them? To dangerous for a rookie? If I want to adjust color what is the best tool to use?

Any thoughts.

Thanks again. You have really helped me to understand some of these issues better.



Regards,

pete

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Old Mar 14, 2005, 4:51 PM   #17
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Hi Guys,

Another stupid question.

I bought a UV-Filter to protect the lens on my camera. Could this be an issue with underexposing my indoor shots? Does it affect my pictures indoors?

Thanks,

Pete
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Old Mar 14, 2005, 8:23 PM   #18
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To answer your questions on the last 2 post.

#1 Underexposure: The built in flash is pretty much useless beyond around 6-8 ft in my opinion. You could increase the EV on the flash to help in some situations if you wanted to try. But you say you have the SB-800 use it! this will help more than anything you could do with the useless built in flash. How you use it will depend on the shot, bounce, diffuser or direct will be a shot to shot setup, bouncing it would most likely be used the most for the shots you seem to be talking about family type shots indoors, also start using it out side also for to help with shadows on things like faces.

#2 Photoshop Level: The levels isn't harming your photo unless you over do it, what the sliders do, the one on the right affects the black or darker side of the photo the middle one affects the mid range area and the right one affects the white or lighter side of the photo shades. You may notice some loss in saturation in your photos when using it but most likely won't produce undesirable affect to you.

#3 File Type: Are you talking about shooting RAW or shooting jpg? in my opinion if you want to really learn how photography is affected by things like WB or know as Kelvin Temperature you will get a better understanding of this if you shoot RAW and start playing with the temperatures and you'll see just how it affects your photo so you can learn to adjust your camera for it when shooting rather than after the fact. For example incandescent light bulbs have a temperature of about 2700K and daylight can vary depending on location and time of day from 3000K -10,000K with mid day temperature of about 5500K. This is described as being Warm (reddish) or Cooler (blue) tint to the photo.

#4 Saving Files Photoshop: If you are working on it save as Photoshop's file .psd or .tiff if you do insist as saving as .jpg you can save as .jpg but do use max and you'll have very little degeneration but not suggested if your going to be editing a lot.

#5 Color Adjustments: Each tool in Photoshop is for a specific function you don't correct WB with color balance while you can change the photo and get it to appear better this isn't the correct way to get the results your looking for fast and efficiently, I mentioned how above using Level Adjustments Layer and resetting the White, Black and Gray points in the photo this is how you'd want to correct WB in a photo if its not a RAW file.

UV filter had not affect on producing underexposure.
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