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Old May 21, 2005, 12:06 PM   #1
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I have a friend who uses a D100. He changed lenses the other day and got an error on his LCD "fEE".

He'd forgotten that it was warning him he'd not fitted the lens correctly. He remembered later, but only after missing several shots because the camera would not fire.

Anyway, when he told me what he to go through to change lens I couldn't believe it.

Why do you have to set a lens to it's smallest aperture when you mount it? Is this just for the D100 or is it any Nikon SLR?

As an EOS owner, all this sounds very odd to me.

Thanks

Paul
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Old May 21, 2005, 12:27 PM   #2
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Any Nikon lens with an aperture ring has to have the aperture set to it's smallest when used on a Nikon camera with programmed exposure. As long as you are not using the lens on an older camera there is never any need to move the aperture ring again, most lenses have a switch to lock the aperture ring.The newer lenses don't have an aperture ring.
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Old May 21, 2005, 12:33 PM   #3
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Even an older Nikon N4004s Film modelI've got requires the aperture ring to be at the smallest aperture setting before the camera works properly.

This is because aperture is being controlled from the camera, not from the lens aperture ring.

From an engineering perspective, I don't know why it needs to be this way (must be on the smallest aperture setting before the camera can control it).That's just the way it works on some models (and has for a long time).

Some lenses don't even have aperture rings any more. ;-)

I don't know about what your friend had to go through (your post seems to imply that he had to remove the lens, since you mentionedit needs to be this way before it'smounted). I don't know about that (it seems unlikely it has to be this way when it'smounted -- requiring it to be removed again to correct the errors).

I would imagine it's just a matter of spinning the aperture ring to the correct position later if it's in the wrong position (which is hardly a major thing, since that's the way you leave your lenses on modern Nikon models). I'm wondering why he had it set to something different to begin with. The manuals fromNikon models I've ownedare quite clear in this respect (set aperture ring to the smallest aperture, complete with photos of a lens showing it).

I don't own a D100, so perhaps others can comment on it.

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Old May 21, 2005, 12:45 PM   #4
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That happens to all Nikon AF bodies. And I think the reason you have to set it tothe smallest aperture is because when you turn the lens until it locks, a something in the mount will hold the aperture lever in the lens (to it's largest aperture setting) which is spring loaded - when you chose an aperture in the body, that something in the mount would only release the lens' lever to a certain position, so the aperture snaps to the pre selected opening. Of course, I'm not an engineer, and I'm assuming that's how it works :roll:
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Old May 21, 2005, 12:50 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the quick replies.

So it's a compatibilty thing with older lenses/bodies?
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Old May 21, 2005, 1:02 PM   #6
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Paul(UK) wrote:
Quote:
Thanks for all the quick replies.

So it's a compatibilty thing with older lenses/bodies?
I guess you could say that....

Although some compatibility issues exist,Nikon decided to give their users an easier upgrade path from older models by not changing their lens mounts as technology progressed with SLR bodies. F Mount has been a standard with Nikon for a long time (introduced in 1959).

In contrast, Canonhas changed their lens mounts along the way (so you couldn't use your old lenses on newer bodies, or your new lenses on older bodies). If you wanted to upgrade from an older Canon SLR (Canon AE1, etc.) to a newer Canon SLR with EF mount lenses, youalsoinvested in new lenses.

So, even thoughmodernCameras don't need an aperture ring anymore, you can still use many lenses on older and newer Nikon models -- film and digital. It's not foolproof (some compatibility problems exist). But, I think it was a good plan and I can imagine manylong time Nikon users appreciate their efforts in this respect (not changing lens mounts as some of the other manufacturers have done).



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