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Old Jun 23, 2005, 1:04 AM   #1
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Hi all, look this again would probebly be a stupid question but could someone please explain what a focal length of 500mm lens be in Compact digital camera talk...ie 10x zoom?? Also how can my old Kodak DX7590 (which took awesome pics , even in the 3x digital zoom) with a toatl 380mm length take pictures that are very good, yet be so small compared to the above mentioned lens which is around $1,000.00 and so big?? Are they mesured by the same standard.....please any opinions would be greatly appreiciated.



Dan
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Old Jun 24, 2005, 7:46 PM   #2
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well thanks for all the replys, 25 people and not one reply, sorry mustve benn another stupid question from a newbie...we all cant be professionals at first.....last time i post here!!!!
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Old Jun 24, 2005, 7:47 PM   #3
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well thanks for all the replys, 25 people and not one reply, sorry mustve been another stupid question from a newbie?...we all cant be professionals at first.....last time i post here!!!!
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Old Jun 26, 2005, 11:46 PM   #4
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Hi,

Well, I'm sorry you didn't get a reply. It seems the forums are most active in the photo posting areas, wildlife, people, landscapes etc. As for your question, it's not stupid. It only needs to be addressed in terms of quality because 500mm is 500mm no matter which camera you're using. In the case of the Sigma, it is a 10 to 1 zoom ratio. A lens with a 10x rating can zoom 10 times as far as the smallest (closest) setting. If a lens is an 18mmx70mm zoom like my lens on my D70, the closest (widest) angle is 18mm and the farthest (narrowest) angle is 70mm so, it has a 3.888888 to 1 zoom ratio. It is a general understanding that the larger the imager (sensor) and the better quality the glass, the better the photograph. Most DSLR's have a larger, more sophisticated imager and processing engine. To an amateur (i'm not far from there) the difference might seem small but to a professional (not me), where a living is made or lost with each snap of the shutter, the quality of the equipment is crucial. In most non-professional digital cameras, the imager is rather tiny and for 4x6 snapshots or the occasional 8x10 they're fine. When you're shooting for the cover of Time or SI those small imagers just won't cut the mustard. In a studio, the photos are blown up to humongus proportions to reveal even the smallest imperfections. In the smaller "digicams" the "noise", lack of "depth", color rendering, shadow detail etc. the list goes on and on, just won't be there. Lenses for the DSLR's are significantly more expensive due to their complexity. Many lenses carry internal focusing motors and control processing units (CPU's) to evaluate metering and focus. Not to mention the higher quality glass used, ED or "extra low dispersion" glass is a must for the professional. It reduces, often eliminates and chromatic aberrations (referred to as "purple fringing") that often accompany photos taken with a consumer "digicam".
So, in conclusion, as was once posted here:G ..."You get what you pay for".

I hope this answers your question,
...Ed
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