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Old Aug 23, 2005, 8:17 PM   #1
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I am having a problem with my D70 when I take photographs of people. When the lighting is not bright direct sunlight on the body part, usually the face or arms, that particular part comes out quite grainy looking. Even on a bright sunny day, if a face is shaded by a wide brimmed hat, the face will undoubtedly come out looking grainy. This occurs even with the ISO set at 200 and the resolution set to Large/Fine. When I use an ISO around 640 (without a flash in sunlight), they are almost unbearably grainy. Considering the ISO goes up to 1600, I am surprised at the amount of grain in these lower ISO's.

Anyone have a suggestionon how to improve or eliminate this problem?

The attached photo was taken on an extremely bright day, at ISO 200, 1/640 at f5.6 with WB direct sunlight and everything else on normal mode. The face appears to be too grainy.

Thanks!


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Old Aug 23, 2005, 8:27 PM   #2
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Sorry....here is the photo
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 8:40 AM   #3
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Thumbnails rarely show minor problems. DO a 100 percent crop of a portion of the photo and post that. The image posted doews NOT look grainy - It does however have an over saturated look and a slight magenta cast. If your colors are off, or too saturated, this would contribute to noise.

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Old Aug 24, 2005, 7:37 PM   #4
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Ok...here is a close up crop of the face...
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 7:40 PM   #5
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Here is another example, this time at 800 ISO, 1/2000, f5.6 with WB set to "cloudy" and everything else normal. I think you can clearly see just how grainy this one came out...
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 8:25 PM   #6
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First, you should expect some noise at an ISO of 800. Second, this picture looks underexposed. The amount of visible noise is increased when an image is underexposed. DSLR's do not have the exposure latitude of today's color negative film. It is closer in latitude to slide film, meaning even minor exposure errors negatively affect the image. I know many say to intentionally underexposure shots with DSLRS because of their tendancy to blow highlights, but what you see here is one of the pitfalls of this strategy. My advice is to get out and practice and learn how to consistantly nail your exposures...this will go a long way in not only reducing this effect, but also how much time you spend in post work.



Good Luck!!
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Old Aug 25, 2005, 7:28 AM   #7
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Use TTL fill flash and the problem is gone.
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Old Aug 25, 2005, 10:51 AM   #8
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DigitalConvert wrote:
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Here is another example, this time at 800 ISO, 1/2000, f5.6 with WB set to "cloudy" and everything else normal. I think you can clearly see just how grainy this one came out...
Let me echo those who posted ahead of me. This should also reflect what kind of metering you do. If the face of the person is most important - you should select a a metering method to narrow the result down to the important part of your image.

And as previous posters suggested, practice, practice practice. You might wnat to go out and blow big bucks on wasting a few hundred shots with braketing Oh wait, I forget, once you own digital you can't blow money on film...:lol:

Dave

PS. Anything over 400 iis considered "high" as far as ISO goes. And here I am referring to film, let alone digital.

Tell me, do you shoot RAW? You will get more control over the results
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Old Aug 26, 2005, 9:34 AM   #9
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Thanks to everyone for the input. Will undoubtedly practice some more and see if I can't learn this camera better. As a general rule, no, I do not shoot raw images. I probably should, as I know I can get much more post production control.
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Old Aug 27, 2005, 10:38 PM   #10
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Hi.

I had the same problem as you, tried everything, samer problem, I went to the canon 20D, Problem Solve. I can shoot at ISO 1600 and be equivalent to ISO 800 etc. and more frames perseond
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