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Old Oct 18, 2013, 1:11 PM   #11
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Jehan -
Thank you. I think you explained it well if I understand you correctly. The first photo example you posted has a shorter shutter speed right? And the second a longer exposure with the flash firing at the end, therefore most of what you see of the main subject is "frozen" for an instant of bright light giving us the impression he isn't moving at all. The tell tale is the slight motion blur you referred to which isn't as well lit during the long shutter opening so it's not so noticeable. I'm thinking therefore that front curtain sync is better suited for shorter shutter speeds right? Since the more time has passed from the flash going off we loose the above effect?

So with rear curtain sync, we can expose the image as long as we like to create whatever background effect we want to, and then fire the flash at the end making our main subject stand out. And with front curtain sync, the longer the exposure after firing the flash the more undesirable the effect I would assume.

Glen -
Thanks to you as well. I really appreciate this feedback! I like the two picture analogy for thinking this through. Can you think of a good example for how and why you would want front curtain sync? That's the one I'm struggling with...

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Old Oct 18, 2013, 1:48 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dvs.pictures View Post
Glen -
Thanks to you as well. I really appreciate this feedback! I like the two picture analogy for thinking this through. Can you think of a good example for how and why you would want front curtain sync? That's the one I'm struggling with...
The front curtain sync is more useful when you know exactly when you want the flash to fire. As there is no (or little) delay, so if you are trying to capture an insect doing something . . . or a person jumping . . . you are more likely to capture them at the precise moment that you want.

If you use rear curtain sync in these situations . . . when you push the shutter button is not necessarily when the flash will fire . . . so you have more of a chance to miss the precise moment that you want to capture.


Just to make things as clear as mud . . . you can also fire the flash in the middle of the exposure or multiple times . . . Yeah. Just confusing . . . but when I take pictures of my kids with sparklers . . . I actually hand hold an old Vivitar 285HV flash unit and trigger it manually (ie. pushing the trigger button on the flash unit itself rather than getting the camera to trigger it.) I do this so I can move the flash unit around so that I can pretend or try to trick the viewer into thinking that this splash of light is coming from the sparklers . . . so if they are holding the sparkler to the left I hold the flash unit to the left of the camera . . . and the right, the right, etc. The way I do it is set the camera for manual exposure, I set an f-stop of about f5.6 or 8 and then choose bulb. Press the shutter trigger and keep it open to capture the sparklers and then fire the flash to get a clean exposure of the person holding the sparkler. Then let go of the trigger and the exposure is finished.

But just writing the above explanation, I realize that there's no reason why you can't fire the flash in the middle of an exposure or multiple times for that matter.

Hope I didn't confuse things that much . . . but once you tear things apart and see what is happening . . . you see there is multiple ways to put it back together . . .

Take care & Happy Shooting!
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Old Oct 18, 2013, 2:03 PM   #13
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Ha! Thats an awesome reply. Capturing things at the exact time you want to makes sense. I love what your doing with holding your flash too. I just picked up a couple of SB700's and already have been experimenting like that myself. I haven't tried anything like what you described yet but think I will.

While asking this question and getting these great replies I have also come to realize the value of shooting more. I will go and practice!

Thanks so much for sharing your valuable experience with me,

Danny
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Old Oct 18, 2013, 2:12 PM   #14
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No problem! Happy Shooting!
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Old Oct 18, 2013, 4:38 PM   #15
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G'day Danny

Here's a simple example to add to those above

I saw this fella with his moving fire-sticks but realised I would also need flash to get him as well
I set the camera to "S" mode, 1/4sec and popped up the on-camera flash and took the photo

So during the 1/4sec, the flash fired capturing the bloke, and for the rest of the exposure, I got the twirling fire sticks



and as you can also see, the 1/4sec exposure also recorded the shop & street lights in the background

Hope this helps
Phil
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Old Oct 30, 2013, 1:56 PM   #16
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But just writing the above explanation, I realize that there's no reason why you can't fire the flash in the middle of an exposure or multiple times for that matter.
What you described (multiple flashes while the shutter is open) was a trick taught to me by a forensic photographer. He called it 'painting with light'. Great for capturing a highway wreck in the middle of the night with only a single potato masher (yeah, I know, it shows my age). And before digital software capable of stacking multiple images, it was the only way to get a usable image.
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Old Dec 15, 2013, 2:00 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Wall-E View Post
What you described (multiple flashes while the shutter is open) was a trick taught to me by a forensic photographer. He called it 'painting with light'. Great for capturing a highway wreck in the middle of the night with only a single potato masher (yeah, I know, it shows my age). And before digital software capable of stacking multiple images, it was the only way to get a usable image.
Yes. Painting with light. Camera on B mode.

Another way to paste this back together is to shoot multiple flashes at the same subject (eg. person) in different phases of what they're doing. Multiple exposure, but not with the shutter, but with the flash acting as the shutter.

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Old Dec 15, 2013, 2:05 PM   #18
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RE: The 2 photos at the same time . . .

I'm just reading the Strobist: Lighting 101 again . . .

http://strobist.blogspot.ca/2006/03/lighting-101.html

And one of the posts mentions the 2 photos at the same time thing.

http://strobist.blogspot.ca/2006/03/...flash-and.html

Really a great read!

Along with the referenced post as well . . .

http://strobist.blogspot.ca/2008/04/...ight-pt-1.html

These posts really help to tear things apart to see a way that they can be put back together!

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