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Old Jan 9, 2006, 7:45 AM   #1
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This is probably a dumb question, but a digital newbie here.

The D-50 does not have a customizeable white balance option...and I will be taking pictures of beaches and rain forests that can be a problem for in-camera programmed light settings. However, my understanding of RAW captures are that I could take a picture of anything in RAW and then adjust the white balance (among other stuff) in something like Photoshop or Elements 4.0. Is this correct?

If so, then the white balance issue is not really that big a deal. Thanks! --K
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Old Jan 9, 2006, 7:53 AM   #2
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I thought the D50 had a preset white balance option. It does according to Steve's review.

With a D70 I use the preset option and shoot RAW. In some circumstances it's not possible to use the preset option. I then shoot a picture that includes something white often just a white card. Using the Photoshop RAW convertor I can use the white dropper tool to select the white card. This then does an automatic white balance. I can then save the settings and use these on any other photographs taken under the same lighting.



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Old Jan 9, 2006, 7:59 AM   #3
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Drag and drop white balance.....that's awesome! Such is the beauty of digital photography.

I already have a 12% grey card, so that would most likely work as well. Cool stuff, thanks!
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Old Jan 10, 2006, 12:32 PM   #4
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kmancpbh wrote:
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Drag and drop white balance.....that's awesome! Such is the beauty of digital photography.

I already have a 12% grey card, so that would most likely work as well. Cool stuff, thanks!
Well I'm not familiar with the D70 - but note, he said "Custom White balance." This means with the aid of a card or my patented White Balance Dog, you make your own White balance setting.

Thom Hogan recomends setting the D1x on Cloudy 3 for shooting in RAW. He states that even though you can adjust your NEFS later, this will give you an edge.

Clearly if you shoot JPEG you have to select the correct WB
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Old Jan 11, 2006, 4:41 AM   #5
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This is as shot the white balance used was custom but set at about 2 metres. At 18 metres there wasn't sufficient light to take a white balance reading.


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Old Jan 11, 2006, 4:44 AM   #6
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Fortunately I remembered that the boats keel was white and in the photoshop RAW convertor I pointed the white dropper at the keel and got the following result. No other changes have been made. Normally I'd also adjust the contrast a bit as well but I think this demonstrates the principle of software custom white balance. With photoshop it's also very easy to save the settings used and apply them to other photos taken in the same lighting.


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Old Jan 15, 2006, 7:24 AM   #7
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As I have yet to tackle these matters either via being a good photographer or mastering Photoshop type software, may I ask a dumb question please? I tried to imagine what you were describing doing (white dropper to the keel) before I looked at the 'after' picture. I expected to see a change in the keel but not the entire picture's 'hue'. When you adjusted the keel to white, did it by association also adjust the whole tone of the picture? Please forgive the total dumbness here, but I guess I just want to understand that by adjusting one focal point to the right 'white' you were also able to affect the entire shot. (Also forgive if I have used my terms incorrectly.)

Thanks,

M


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Old Jan 15, 2006, 9:09 AM   #8
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melt1109 wrote:
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As I have yet to tackle these matters either via being a good photographer or mastering Photoshop type software, may I ask a dumb question please? I tried to imagine what you were describing doing (white dropper to the keel) before I looked at the 'after' picture. I expected to see a change in the keel but not the entire picture's 'hue'. When you adjusted the keel to white, did it by association also adjust the whole tone of the picture? Please forgive the total dumbness here, but I guess I just want to understand that by adjusting one focal point to the right 'white' you were also able to affect the entire shot. (Also forgive if I have used my terms incorrectly.)

Thanks,

M
What is White? White appears different according to the light. White looks different in sunlight, tungten lights, clouds, etc. But to the HUMAN eye, white always looks the same, but not to the camera. Your eye sets the White balance automatically.

You tell the program, "See that keel? That keel is white. And you click the eyedroper on the white keel. Now you have defined what is white and the entire image reflects that change. You have manually "set" the White Balance for the entire image.

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Old Jan 15, 2006, 10:46 AM   #9
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Thank you. That makes sense. It was a concept that was just on the verge of becoming a light bulb, ah ha, moment. I learn weirdly but eventually.

Thanks,

M
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Old Jan 15, 2006, 12:07 PM   #10
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melt1109 wrote:
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Thank you. That makes sense. It was a concept that was just on the verge of becoming a light bulb, ah ha, moment. I learn weirdly but eventually.

Thanks,

M
It's one of the reasons I shoot RAW instead of JPEG. In the Raw converter I set the WB by moving a slider which adjusts the color "temperature."

Doing this with an eye droper is hit and miss - because often enough we think of an "off white" object as being white. I prefer to move the slider until it looks right to my eye.

The eye droper method can be used on JPEGS in the "Levels" option of PS - it's one heck of a lot better then nothing - but no where near as good as properly adjusting a RAW image in the RAW converter.

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