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Old Feb 4, 2006, 6:12 PM   #1
sks
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* Hi, I'm new to this forum and also somewhat new to photography.* Anyways I recently purchased a D70s and was wondering what the maximum size photo is that you can print when shooting in raw or course.* Also without using any photoshop plugins to expand the size, just straight shooting in raw and opening up in photoshop.* Right now every .nef raw file I open up is usually right at 15.36x10.213 at 400 resolution.* *Here's a screenshot of it http://trail-blazer.org/files/temp/ssofpicsize.jpg * ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** *What's weird is it's either just me or I could have sworn one of the first times I opened up a file it was over 20" in width and height.* I can even make the image size larger in photoshop somewhat without pixelating it, so I know it can go bigger than 15.3 x 10.2.* Sorry to be long-winded, but I was just wondering what is the max size so I can just open it up at that all the time.**Thanks,sks
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Old Feb 4, 2006, 6:54 PM   #2
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The largest I would recommend from a NEF file from the D70s would be a 20" x 30" print. When viewed at the proper viewing distance, they look great. As far as the largest size at exhibition quality with out resampling, you're looking at a 10" x 6.6" print at 300ppi. The larger you go, the lower ppi you can use to achieve the same results as long as viewing distance (twice the diagonal, just like a TV) is taken into consideration.
The screen shot you show, is not a native size file from the D70s, it has been resampled considerably, that's why it's so big at 400ppi. It's shows an image that's 25+MP, twice the resolution of the D70s. The more ppi used, the smaller the image size will be, and vice-versa.
With those large image sizes make sure to use 16 bit color depth.

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Old Feb 4, 2006, 9:46 PM   #3
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Thanks for the tips man, here's a screenshot of opening a file up in camera raw.* So your saying I could open it up in photoshop and crop out a 20x30 but that's about it, and exibition quality is only 10x6.6?* Sorry for sounding like such a noobie, but what exactly is exhibition quality?* Like what you would see at a photography show?* Just seems so small to me, I thought the camera would do at least a 20x30 .Thanks again,skshttp://trail-blazer.org/files/temp/cameraraw.jpg
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Old Feb 4, 2006, 11:39 PM   #4
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Yes, exhibition quality is what you would see at a show. If you need to print a larger print, then use the size adustment in ACR, but only if you need to. It uses a similar approach to Photoshop Bicubic Smoother resampling to give you pretty good results. Naturally if it has a - next to it, it's downsizing the image and if it has a = next to it, it's upsizing, but when you do this, you are either throwing away data, or creating data. The camera will do a 20" x 30", but at 100ppi. You would have to view it about 10 feet away for it to look good. Upsizing will help bring that viewing distance in closer, but it will be doing so with some created data. What it comes down to, is the camera WILL do a 20" x 30".
I suggest trying stitching multiple images together, you will get amazing results and you can make an image as big as you want.
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Old Feb 5, 2006, 10:56 AM   #5
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"I suggest trying stitching multiple images together, you will get amazing results and you can make an image as big as you want."


Hi SlapNTickleJr, I have seen a couple of references to stiching multiple images to improve image quality. Can you please explain how and why you do it?

Rgds, Vincent
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Old Feb 5, 2006, 12:02 PM   #6
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Hmm but 100ppi is that even printable, since web rez is 72 and I thought you needed a minimum of 300 if not 400ppi for printing.* At least that's what we use for projects in this graphic design program I take some classes at.**Taking a break from computer today, SuperBowl Sunday time!!
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Old Feb 6, 2006, 8:56 AM   #7
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sks wrote:
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[snip]... without using any photoshop plugins to expand the size, just straight shooting in raw and opening up in photoshop. Right now every .nef raw file I open up is usually right at 15.36x10.213 at 400 resolution.
The screen shot you showed us indicates that you're interpolating the image to get that size print size at 400dpi. That's why the resolution is shown as 6144 x 4085 at that print size. You don't need extra plugins to do it. That's what the "resample" is doing (the box you've got checked). Bicubic is the algorithm you're using.

IOW, it's adding pixels not captured by the sensor if you try to use those parameters. It does this by looking at adjacent pixels to try and determine how to add more pixels.

The native resolution of your D70s is 3,008 x 2,000 pixels (6,016,000 pixels or approx. 6 Megapixels).

Your settings are enlarging the image to 6144 x 4085 pixels (25, 098, 240 pixels or approx. 25 Megapixels) by adding pixels not captured by the camera's sensor.

Most printers will ignore the dpi count shown (you've got it set to 400). The pixels per inch will be based on the size of the image.

For example, if you print a 3008 x 2000 pixel image at a print size of 8 x 12 inches, you'll have 200 pixels per inch of detail (3008 pixels/ 12 inches = 200 pixels per inch of detail, or 2000 pixels / 8 inches = 2000 pixels per inch of detail.

If you use PS to increase the size to 6144 x 4085, you're only adding pixels that were not captured by the camera, based on the values of adjacent pixels. If you did that, and printed at the same 8x12" print size, then you'd have approx. 512 pixels per inch being sent to the printer (6144 pixels / 12 inches - 512 pixels per inch). You'll be a pixel or two off on the other side (but that's just an error from the resizing, and is not enough to impact aspect ratio when printing).

But, that doesn't give you any more detail being sent to the printer (since the pixels being added were not captured by the camera). For some printers, the drivers may even need to downsize the image (resulting in some degradation over the original) in order to use the size of the image you're enlarging it, too.

Inerpolation is useful for printing at larger size to prevent pixelation. But, it can degrade image quality if you overdo it.

Note that the input dpi to the printer, is not the same as it's output (it takes multiple dots on a page to represent each pixel being sent to it).

Here is an article that may help you to understand what the Photoshop is doing, based on the settings you use in the dialog box:

http://www.photo.co.nz/faq/resolution.htm

Is interpolation useful? Sure. It helps maintain pixel density being sent to the printer to prevent pixelation (it does this by adding more pixels). That won't increase the detail capture.

How large can you print? That depends on the subject type. Some subjects interpolate better than others. Viewing size also comes into play (you won't be viewing a larger print from as close).

Lin Evans has an excellent forum post on this toipic HERE (the 2:18PM post from Oct. 13th):

A good tool
that you can use that automatically optimizes the image size to a specific printer (using sophisticated interpolation algorithms) is QImage Pro

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