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Old Mar 20, 2003, 8:59 AM   #1
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Default basic lens question

Now your really going to think I'm a dumb blonde but I have to ask this basic question. When I purchased my Nikon D100 I also purchased a Nikkor 24-85 3.5-4.5 G afs, and a nikkor 50mm1:1.4D lens. With all things being equal, when would I use the 50mm lens. The zoom covers that range and with over 300 shots taken, seems to give a clearer shot so far. I bought the two lens after reading alot of reviews but you can tell by this question that I'm new at SRL cameras. And heres one more question. Is there a huge difference between the 80-200 AF zoom and the 80-200 AFS zoom? I know the AFS costs around $700 more.
Thanks again and see ya on the mountain.
Hiking Girl
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Old Mar 20, 2003, 10:28 AM   #2
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Well, I don't know if you're a blond or not... but it isn't a dumb question either way. As they say, "there are no dumb questions, only dumb answers."

First, I'd be surprised if the zoom gave a sharper picture than the standard lens. The 50mm is a very good lens. But the reality is that theoritical sharpness doesn't matter if you don't do what is necessary to see the difference. So it is probably the same for your uses.

But to your question. Low light is the answer. The 50mm is a much faster lens. This will allow you to use a faster shutter speed in the same light, than the zoom. Or the same shutter speed and a lower f-stop. And that can make all the difference in the world. Try taking a picture indoors, at night, by candle light, using both lenses. You'll see the difference right away.

As to the AF vs. AFS question. What would you use that lens for? If you're taking pictures of fast moving things (birds, running dogs, kids playing basketball) then the AF-S might be worth it. If you're taking landscapes, or kids acting in a play... Then it probably isn't.

As to optically quality, I'd need to more about the lenses. Are these the f2.8 versions? The optical quality between those two is very small (I've read.)
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Old Mar 20, 2003, 3:40 PM   #3
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Eric,
Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question without making me feel like a dope. With this new confidence, I'll venture to ask one more. One the 50 mm lens, there are several f stops listed from 1.4 to 16. The 16 has a locking tab on it. When i try to shot at any level different that 16 the camera registers an error and it won't let me shoot. Am I doing something wrong Eric?
thanks
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Old Mar 21, 2003, 1:56 PM   #4
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hiking girl

Glad to help. I'm only guessing with this question, though. Someone who knows more about the D100 can chime in.

I believe the D100 can set the f-stop from the camera body (which is why it works with G-type lenses that don't have apeture rings.) I don't know if any special setting must be made on camera so that it lets the lens setting override its setting. Your manual might help you here. You could also try setting the f-stop from the camera and see what happens.

If you got the lens from a local shop I'd swing by and show them the problem. It *could* be a problem with the lens, but I'd be surprised. Nikon quality control is normally above selling a new lens with this extreme a problem.
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Old Mar 22, 2003, 9:20 AM   #5
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Default Try the wheel just below the shutter release...

I believe it will change the aperture, in aperture priority or manual. The wheel on the back will change shutter speed in shutter priority or manual. At least that's the way it works on the N80 that is used as the base camera for the D100, and also the Fuji S2.

Good luck


Tim
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Old Mar 22, 2003, 11:38 AM   #6
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Look on page 21 of your manual. Here is the text:
------------------------
Introduction—First Steps
Lock aperture at the minimum setting This step is not necessary if you are using a type G lens (type G lenses are not equipped with an aperture ring). If you are using a lens of another type, lock aperture at the minimum setting (highest f/-number).

If you do not perform this step when using a CPU lens, the aperture displays in the control panel and viewfinder will show a blinking when the camera is turned on. Photographs can not be taken until you have turned the camera off and locked aperture at the highest f/-number.
------------------------
So it looks like I was right. You have to set the aperture from the camera.

There is some more comments about lenses starting on page 176. Specifically page 178 says something about locking the aperture.
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Old Mar 22, 2003, 7:47 PM   #7
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Eric,
Thanks again,
If you ever need advise on hiking gear...
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Old Mar 28, 2003, 1:12 PM   #8
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On the Nikon electronic AF 35 mm film cameras and the D1 (series) and the D-100, a D series lens, which has an aperture ring at the base of the lens just forward of the mounting plate, the aperture ring MUST be locked in the maximum aperture position (smallest lens opening). The camera controls the aperture, opening the lens wide to let in as much light as possible for viewing in the viewfinder and then stopping the lens down to a larger number f-stop when the picture is taken. In automatic mode (Priority) the camera will make an compromise setting of the f-stop and shutter speed to give you a proper exposure. However, you can adjust the f-stop manually (to control DOF) by switching to aperture priority mode and setting the desired f-stop with the control wheel. The camera will then auto-select the correct shutter speed to correspond with the selected f-stop and will warn you if your selection is "out of range". Likewise, you can go into shutter priority mode and select a shutter speed manually and let the camera adjust the f-stop accordingly. If going into full manual mode, wherein you are going to select both the f-stop and shutter speed, you can then unlock the aperture adjusting ring on the lens and set the f-stop manually, however, this might possibly involve opening the lens up for viewing and then stopping it down again for picture taking, so, in my opinion, at least, I would suggest leaving the lens locked and adjusting aperture electronically on the camera. In fact, if you are using a "G" series lens, which does not have a mechanical aperture control ring on it, that is the only way you can do it.

BTW, I have both a D1X and a D-100 and have got to tell you that the D-100 is "a great camera." You can check my profile to see what lenses I have, but I'll shortly be adding one of the newly announced 12-24 mm's to the list. It has been on order for a month now and I expect to see it in about another month to six weeks. I am on the top of the order list at a rather large Nikon dealership, so if they get more than 1 in their first shipment, one of the others is mine. In case anybody is wondering about the price, it is $1049.
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