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Old Feb 8, 2006, 11:53 AM   #1
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This is probably not model specific, but I am having trouble telling how truly yukky a picture is when looking at it on the LCD versus after it is transferred to the PC. Does this just take some getting used to? Mostly focus issues - light and composition I seem to be doing ok on discerning from the LCD. I wear reading glasses. I was advised to shoot with the diopter adjusted to my reading glasses and to shoot with them on. This seems bizarre to me, but it could just be lack of understanding. I am just such a novice, I admit, but it is quite disappointing to get a few shots home and be so disappointed when I look at the picture after I transfer it.

I admit I'm shooting in manual mode to try to learn and since I want the picture as I see it without 'enhancements' at this point in the learning experience. Have I just started too far down the learning curve for what little I know? (Adjusting focal length, composition, shutter speed, fstop, ISO to see what it does to the same picture for example.)

Ok, so I've rewritten this post about 5 times and thought I'd get thefirst fewquestions out for feedback before adding the other thousand. I was also going to attach an image but though I got it resized with PS6, I lost EXIF. Read through the how-to posts but didn't find the one that tells how to keep the info upon resize or which software will allow both. Could have missed itthough.Right now I've got Nikon View/Browser for transfers and PS6. If I get some general feedback here, I'm going to try posting a few for hopefully gentle critques.

Thanks for all your help. M
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Old Feb 8, 2006, 12:48 PM   #2
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melt1109 wrote:
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This is probably not model specific, but I am having trouble telling how truly yukky a picture is when looking at it on the LCD versus after it is transferred to the PC. Does this just take some getting used to? Mostly focus issues - light and composition I seem to be doing ok on discerning from the LCD. I wear reading glasses. I was advised to shoot with the diopter adjusted to my reading glasses and to shoot with them on. This seems bizarre to me, but it could just be lack of understanding. I am just such a novice, I admit, but it is quite disappointing to get a few shots home and be so disappointed when I look at the picture after I transfer it.

I admit I'm shooting in manual mode to try to learn and since I want the picture as I see it without 'enhancements' at this point in the learning experience. Have I just started too far down the learning curve for what little I know? (Adjusting focal length, composition, shutter speed, fstop, ISO to see what it does to the same picture for example.)

Ok, so I've rewritten this post about 5 times and thought I'd get the first few questions out for feedback before adding the other thousand. I was also going to attach an image but though I got it resized with PS6, I lost EXIF. Read through the how-to posts but didn't find the one that tells how to keep the info upon resize or which software will allow both. Could have missed it though. Right now I've got Nikon View/Browser for transfers and PS6. If I get some general feedback here, I'm going to try posting a few for hopefully gentle critques.

Thanks for all your help. M
Hi M

I'm probably a minority in this, but I never look at the LCD. I am SOOOOO ashamed.

Now as far as setting the diopter to match your glasses, this makes sense ONLY if you CAN'T adjust the diopter to match your vision.

To properly adjust the diopter, set the camera on auto focus. Focus in on a close object, adjust the diopter and then focus on something 15 or 20 feet away and confirm that the setting are correct.

Now, as far as shooting in manual mode. I shoot all modes. Depends on the situation. You don't get a medal from shooting manual. And no one deducts points for making use of the various auto modes.

Want a higher speed for action? Set it in "Shutter Priority." Need extra or less light? Greater Depth of field? Set it in aperture priortiy.

Shooting wildlife in thick brush? Set it on manual focus.

But give yourself a break. Half of photography is framing and shooting technique. Are you steady? Is the image "framed" properly? I will make a guess that part of your disappoitment is caused by camera shake or movement.

Enjoy yourself!!!! Very few people will die as a result of any failure on your part...:?:

Dave
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Old Feb 8, 2006, 1:29 PM   #3
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Thanks Dave,

quote: I'm probably a minority in this, but I never look at the LCD. I am SOOOOO ashamed.

You would if some of your pictures were black from all the wrong settings, LOL.

Will try the info on the diopter adjustment. I can read it without my glasses as I had it originally adjusted. Gonna print the post for afixing to my notecards I carry with me for when I get overwhelmed. Thanks. Sometimes the friendly common sense translationis way better than the manual.

Thanks,

M

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Old Feb 8, 2006, 1:56 PM   #4
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The only possible advantage of adjusting the viewfinder diopter to suit your glasses is that it would allow you to switch between viewfinder and LCD without taking your glasses on and off.

The LCD screen is too small to determine whether you have sharp focus or not, although you can magnify the image which helps if there is a particular point you want to check.

I use the LCD to check that I've got the aperture and shutter right for the lighting but not for judging the quality of the shot. I shoot in RAW format so even shots that appera too light or too dark can sometimes be saved in post processing but it's best to get it right to start with.

As for exif data I guess PSP 6 doesn't support it. I use PhotoShop and Nikon View and the exif data is preserved I just treat the files as normal.

Ken


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Old Feb 8, 2006, 2:38 PM   #5
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I rarely shoot in full manual mode. Unless I'm doing studio type work or want a specific effect I almost always shoot in either aperature or shutter priority. I even use P alot, so I can focus on the framing. I only use the LCD to check framing and look at the histogram and highlight review. It's almost impossible to check focus on the LCD as the image is just too small.

You can actually learn more from using the exposure modes than by shooting full manual. By just paying attention to what the camera selects based on the aperature/shutter speed you choose, you can begin to understand how exposure is determined.

By the way, I never use the vari modes..they provide a good starting point but never seem to dial in the exact effect as much as I would like.
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Old Feb 9, 2006, 7:48 AM   #6
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Thanks also Ken and rjseeney!

I will double check that none of my issues are not putting my glasses back on when I look at the LCD. I'll have to pull the manual back out to figure out how to magnify. (I know how to get the histogram and highlights). I think also I have the brightness turned up which may also be another issue on a photo I took recently late in the day that looked promising but was indeed too dark.

I too can use the vari mode as a starting point in non-full-blown experiments as a starting point. I can also start concentrating on the non-manual non-vari modes for what they are intended to accomplish versus trying to accomplish everything in manual. Back a while ago I posted that I learn by doing and seeing the results, which may be why I went to manual - trying to translate all the words word words I've read about fstops, shutter speed and ISOand inverse relationships, etc. I remember taking a few pics and getting a poor result but also saying, ah ha, I expected that, now if I change thus and so it will get better. So I guess all was not lost. Thanks to all of your great (kind and gentle) advice, I can go out with a more focused less frustrated approach.

rjseeney: can you resize in Nikon View? I knew I had too old a version of PS for some things based on some feedback from you and Ken, but, I'll be darned if I could find it.

I haven't bought either Elements, CS2 or Nikon Capture yet. nor the 50/1.8 or flash...have been a little camera poor and what should have been lots of time in January turned into still no time in February.

Thanks again folks!

M
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Old Feb 9, 2006, 8:01 AM   #7
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Honestly, I'm not sure if you can resize in Nikon view...I used it for about 10 minutes and hated it. I assume if you can do basic editing with NV, you should be able to resize. It would probably be under the image tab.
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