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Old Mar 5, 2006, 11:06 AM   #1
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Hi all - I am new here, so please bear with me. I have a wonderful old fashion camera n90s with s SB-28 speedlight and Tamron AF 28-300 mm lens. Can aither of these items be used on any digital camera out there. WIthout having to sell my children?

thanks!!
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Old Mar 5, 2006, 2:44 PM   #2
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The lens will work, although with the digital crop your 28-300 will function as a 42-450. If your interested in landscape, or group shots, you should go ahead and buy the kit lens with either the d50 or D70, which covers the wider angles your tamron lens covers on a film camera.

Your speedlight is not completely compatible with the camera. The digital bodies have i-ttl metering opposed to ttl found in film bodies. For complete compatibility you'll need either the Sb600 or SB-800. The SB-28 still has some value on the used market, so you may be able to use it to help fund your new purchase. Otherwise the SB600 does 85% of the things the 800 does (most of which you won't miss) for about 1/3 the price.
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Old Mar 5, 2006, 2:48 PM   #3
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Mary, be aware that the Sensor in non full frame DSLR's (ie most DSLR's) is smaller than the equivalent 35mm area of film that is exposed during each shot. This means that only the central part of the lens is used, which has the effect of multiplying the optics maginification by a factor of about x1.5

so your 28-300 will become a 42 - 450mm

it's nice to get the extra zoom but it is at the cost of your wide end.

to get down to 28mm, you will need a lens of around 18mm,

so an 18 - 55 lens on a digital equates to roughly a 28 - 80mm lens on a film camera
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Old Mar 5, 2006, 3:08 PM   #4
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Your speedlight will work but not in ttl mode. This means going back to the old way of doing things and setting the camera aperture according to the flash to subject distance.

If you shoot RAW you'll be able to make small changes to the exposure in post processing and the review on the LCD on the back of the camera gives you a fair idea of whether or not you've got the shot.

I shoot mostly underwater and nearly always with flash. When I got into digital TTL wasn't an option and I thought I'd really miss it. I've found that I don't miss it at all. It's easier than I expected to get the exposure right with manual flash and checking the result on the LCD.
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Old Mar 6, 2006, 7:53 AM   #5
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Thank you all for your replies - it makes some sense to me now. Are there any digital point and shoots with a decent zoom on them already, out there? nikon 8700?
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Old Mar 7, 2006, 1:22 PM   #6
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Beep beep, back the focal length truck up! Don't get the wrong idea about you're current lense's focal lenght: the previous posts were correct when explaining that your lense projects a larger image circle than the digital sensor, but you will not get a boost in focal length because of this. A 300mm focal length will provide the exact same amount of "zoom" on a digital as it will on a 35mm film SLR, but what you lose going to digital is angle of view. Since your digital sensor is smaller than the 35mm film frame (by a factor of 1.5), your angle of view at 300mm will be equivalent to that of a 450mm lense on a 35mm film frame, but the magnification will be identical. Make sense? Sorry to rant, but this is my biggest pet peeve, and in everyone's defense, even the camera manufacturers are taking advantage of this misperception by printing the"equivalent" focal length right on the lenses of point-and-shoots and EVFs.

-Blake
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Old Mar 7, 2006, 2:16 PM   #7
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You are correct in saying the focal length is not increased. However, because the image area is smaller, the resulting cropped image is the same as adding the extra focal length to a film SLR. For example, a 200mm lens, the focal length is the same whether on a film SLR or a DSLR. However, becasue the DSLR has a smaller image area, the resulting cropped image has the same field of view as a 300mm lens on a film SLR. Because the results are the same, I think the equivalent focal length description is accurate. As DSLR's become standard, and people forget about 35mm SLR, perhaps we won't need to speak in terms of equivalent focal length.
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Old Mar 7, 2006, 2:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
As DSLR's become standard, and people forget about 35mm SLR, perhaps we won't need to speak in terms of equivalent focal length.
This is probably true, except dSLRs have different sensor sizes so we need a common point of reference. I mean, I'd hate to be the sucker who's sold a "14-45mm" Oympus Zuiko lens, while not knowing that 14mm on a Oly with 2x crop factor is not as wide as 18mm on a Nikon.



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Old Mar 7, 2006, 3:11 PM   #9
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rey wrote:
Quote:
Quote:
As DSLR's become standard, and people forget about 35mm SLR, perhaps we won't need to speak in terms of equivalent focal length.
This is probably true, except dSLRs have different sensor sizes so we need a common point of reference. I mean, I'd hate to be the sucker who's sold a "14-45mm" Oympus Zuiko lens, while not knowing that 14mm on a Oly with 2x crop factor is not as wide as 18mm on a Nikon.


Good point:!: However, if we just keep shooting Nikon, we won't have to worry about being the sucker.

As I said before, that's why i think speaking in terms of 35mm equivalent is a good thing, at least for now.
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