Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 11, 2006, 2:22 AM   #1
rey
Senior Member
 
rey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 949
Default

Anyone here actually use Spot Metering with their D50? I'm really new to SLR and very interested on learning spot metering, and I'm wondering if anyone here have used it with the D50.

Anybody out there who uses spot metering maybe you can tell us of any good books, websites, etc. about the topic. Any info is appreciated. I'm new to this, and I'm willing to learn. I figured since I just spent $1000 on a DSLR system, I don't wanna do just point and shoot with it. Are the Bahman Farzad books any good?

It would be nice if the info are regarding DSLRs and not 35mm or medium format cameras.

Thanks for any help.

rey is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 11, 2006, 6:56 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Spot metering is most useful under tough lighting conditions. A classic example is when photographing a backlit subject. In this example, under matrix or even centerweight, the stronlgy lit background would cause the subject to be underexposed. Alot of birders also shoot with spot metering. What it and the other forms of metering do is fairly well explained in the manual.

There are many good books available on general photography basics. Thom Hogan has an ebook specifically on the D50 available on his website, http://www.bythom.com. Or you could just look on amazon. In reality, there is not much of a difference in how DSLR's and regular slr cameras work...the only major difference is the capture medium (film vs digital sensor). There are some minor difference (ie, lack of dynamic range for DSLRS) but nothing to really worry about.

Also, there is no shame in using the camera in Point and Shoot. I use my camera in auto mode at times, when I want to focus on the subject and just getting the shot. Today's cameras do a good job in auto mode. I rarely use full manual unless I'm trying to achieve a specific effect..I think most (including myself) usually use just Aperature or shutter priority mode (selecting the f stop or shutter speed you want and letting the camera do the rest).
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12, 2006, 4:32 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
tommysdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 714
Default

I found this link to be informative.There is also a link to the Bahmad Farzad book that was mentioned

http://www.spotmetering.com/spnd50/d50-2.htm

TD
tommysdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12, 2006, 6:56 PM   #4
rey
Senior Member
 
rey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 949
Default

rjseeney, what exactly do you mean by "lack of dynamic range"



It looks like Bahman Farzad's books are popular, but I also notice his webpages uses bright and big fonts, and I don't know if it's all hype. I checked out my local bookstores and they don't carry his books. I'd like to see them first before buying them.

I've been reading a lot about the Zone System, and I'm looking for something about it that applies to digital slr as supposed to film, I know there are also a lot similarities.

Anybody out there who actually use some variation of ZS with their D50? I'm wondering if whether the fact that the D50's spot metering area is bigger than the D70s, if it all affects results, plus I'd be interested to know if anyone has had problems with D50's calibration and metering, especially indoors.


Thanks.

rey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 12, 2006, 7:44 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Dynamic range refers to a mediums ability to properly expose the brightest and darkest areas of an image. Film has great range. Film rarely blows highlights even when a bit over exposed. Digital has much less range, and even slight overexposure will tend to blow highlights if you're not careful.

I use both the D50 and D70 and haven't gotten significantly different results when using spot metering. Be aware that I don't often use spot metering.

I haven't done any tests, but the D50 seems to handle most metering correctly. I usually dial the exposure back to -.03 using exposure compensation if there are some bright areas in the scene (bright skies come to mind), as highlights do seem to blow easily, which is true in most digital cameras I've used.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 16, 2006, 7:19 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
ruchai's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 287
Default

I use my D50 for wild birds and insects. For birds against brightsky like this photo spot meter is very helpful. I usually set spotmeter as a default.

For the book about digital SLRtry, "Mastering Digital SLR Photography" by David D. Busch, is the best. I got mine from http://www.amazon.com
Attached Images
 
ruchai is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:18 AM.