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Old Mar 17, 2006, 8:59 AM   #1
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Hi all,

I am planning to get the D50 but am concerned about all the dust scare stories. However, I am confused about how bad the problem really is. On thing that springs to mind is that if there is a mechanical shutter then the CCD is protected from dust while changing lenses? So to get dust on the sensor it needs to get in the camera while changing the lens then get from the miror box to the CCD during an exposure. While this can clearly happen, it does not sound like an everyday event.
Also, does anyone use the dust removal feature of Nikon Capture?

Keith.

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Old Mar 17, 2006, 9:02 AM   #2
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Is it just me who cannot see my post? It looked fine in the preview but totally black now I look at it.

Keith.
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Old Mar 17, 2006, 9:12 AM   #3
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keith1200rs wrote:
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Hi all,

I am planning to get the D50 but am concerned about all the dust scare stories. However, I am confused about how bad the problem really is. On thing that springs to mind is that if there is a mechanical shutter then the CCD is protected from dust while changing lenses? So to get dust on the sensor it needs to get in the camera while changing the lens then get from the miror box to the CCD during an exposure. While this can clearly happen, it does not sound like an everyday event.
Also, does anyone use the dust removal feature of Nikon Capture?

Keith.

http://photobucket.com/albums/v345/keith1200rs/
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Old Mar 17, 2006, 9:25 AM   #4
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Your original post does seem to be black on black, I can read it if I select it.

Dust is a problem with DSLR cameras. I believe that part of the problem is that when in use the CCD is electrically charged so attracts any dust present. Maybe this is why the mechanical shutter doesn't keep it clean.

My D70 is about 18 months old and after trying a blower bulb for 12 months I bit the bullet back in October and bought cleaning fluid and swabs and cleaned the sensor. It was nerve wracking but not too difficult and so far there's been no need to clean it again.

So it's a problem but not too much of a problem and to my mind the results are worth it.
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Old Mar 17, 2006, 10:05 AM   #5
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Nagasaki wrote:
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Your original post does seem to be black on black, I can read it if I select it.

Dust is a problem with DSLR cameras. I believe that part of the problem is that when in use the CCD is electrically charged so attracts any dust present. Maybe this is why the mechanical shutter doesn't keep it clean.

My D70 is about 18 months old and after trying a blower bulb for 12 months I bit the bullet back in October and bought cleaning fluid and swabs and cleaned the sensor. It was nerve wracking but not too difficult and so far there's been no need to clean it again.

So it's a problem but not too much of a problem and to my mind the results are worth it.
:lol:

Well the shutter does not hermetically seal anything. Dust, is, well it's dust, and really, really small....

Forunately we do not have to clear the sensor which would be nerve wracking, but rather the anti-aliasing filter. This filter is made of VERY tough material. I wrap a lint free cloth or paper around a plastic fork and rub as hard as desired. You could use wood - only metal can scratch the filter.

It's an annoying but actually minor problem. It takes me five mintes to do the cleaning. First time, was an hour, because I was so nervous.

dave
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Old Mar 17, 2006, 11:45 AM   #6
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Thanks for the reasuring replies. I just had visions of havng to clean it every day:sad:

Now, why is the preview against a white background and the forum against a black one:?

Keith.
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Old Mar 17, 2006, 12:43 PM   #7
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Yeah from what I understand, the anti-alias / infra-red filter is what you actually clean. Others have suggested using a small spatula wrapped in lint free cloth to give the handle more cushion. Also, the less you touch it the better, so just swipe it ones. But I think for the most part, the blower should be good enough.

When changing lens out in the field, I read it's a good idea to bring a clean and see-through plastic bag, and change lens while the camera is inside. Also, I wonder if changing lens in the bathroom after increasing humidity (ie running hot water for a few minutes) would help. Dust should absord the moisture, and settle on the floor or counter top.

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Old Mar 19, 2006, 10:04 AM   #8
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rey wrote:
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When changing lens out in the field, I read it's a good idea to bring a clean and see-through plastic bag, and change lens while the camera is inside. Also, I wonder if changing lens in the bathroom after increasing humidity (ie running hot water for a few minutes) would help. Dust should absord the moisture, and settle on the floor or counter top.
Strangely enough, I've found the most important aspect of changing a lens, is to keep the camera pointed DOWN. That had more benefits then a plastic bag - although probably doing BOTH would be best.

Dave
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Old Mar 19, 2006, 10:52 AM   #9
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I guess to keep the dust out we just don't change the lense:lol:.

Okay, back to reality - - when I change 'em I first use a blower around the lens mount to remove as much dust & dirt as possible and then have the camera pointed down when I change 'em. About once a year I start to notice specks on the pics and figure it's time to take the camera to a professional camera shop and let them do the cleaning - I simply don't have the nerve - nor the patients - to do it myself.
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Old Mar 19, 2006, 11:04 AM   #10
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Yeah, the pointing down is a given. That's what I do.

The problem with that is the lens mount will have to be pointing up, which could get dust, and then you'll have dust in the mirror box, sensor area. After a while, I'm sure it could get on the sensor's filter.

Also another thing you shouldn't do is put the lens and camera cap on your shirt or pants pocket as it would attract lint. I still do this, so I always blow on it before using them. Another thing I do is change lens inside my car, if possible. Then I don't have to worry about the wind or breeze outside.


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