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Old May 6, 2006, 12:34 AM   #1
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Hi,

I owned a brandnew $500 Canon S2 IS. Still under warranty i retuned it to the camerashop, because it has a big zoom problem. I have the option now to choose another brand. I'm deciding between the Panasonic FZ20, the Nikon D50 and the Pentax *IST DL. A new Nikon will be a bit too expensive($800), but offers more control and speed i think than the Panasonic and the Pentax. I'm thinking about a factory refurbished Nikon D50. Can someone give me some advice which one too choose. I need some advice too on refurbished cameras. Do you get everything in the box like a new one and will it break soon?? Please help because i want to take pictures again and i don't want to end up running back to the store or end up with nothing.

many thanks in advance

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Old May 6, 2006, 6:24 PM   #2
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There's a thread on this forum that deals with remanufactured D50s. Matter of fact, I have one from Cameta Camera on eBay. Can't tell it from new, also got the 18-55 and 55-200. Only had it about a week but it's a great system.

Don't think you'll go wrong with a refurb -- if you get it from a Nikon dealer.

Happy hunting.

OTC
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Old May 6, 2006, 7:05 PM   #3
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simson wrote:
Quote:
A new Nikon will be a bit too expensive($800), but offers more control and speed i think than the Panasonic and the Pentax.
That's very high for a new D50 body (and still high for the D50 + 18-55mm kit).

Is that for the two lens kit (d50 body + 18-55mm + 55-200mm)? If so, that's a good price.

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Old May 6, 2006, 10:31 PM   #4
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I live in Suriname(South America)
The price is made up of camera cost + shipping + taxes

How does the Nikon D50 compares to the Pentax IST DL

I think of

1 Good low light capabilities
2 Fast autofocus in low light
3 Noise at High Iso
4 Quality of camera body, control buttons and mode dial

many thanks
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Old May 7, 2006, 9:40 AM   #5
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The Nikon is going to be better in most areas compared to the Pentax (AF peformance, number of focus points, noise levels, buffer/cycle times between photos, etc.). If you shoot in raw versus jpeg, the image quality differences will narrow (since both are using a Sony sensor and the raw converter is doing the processing versus the camera).

But, the Pentax models (as are the Nikons) are well liked by most of their owners.

Personally, I like the ergonomics of the Pentax models (surprisingly good considering how small the bodies are), and it is one of the smallest and lightest DSLR solutions around (especially with a lens like a Pentax 40mm f/2.8 Limited Pancake on it).

The Pentax also has an available ISO 3200 setting (the Nikon only goes through ISO 1600). I'd personally rather have that option (sometimes noise is preferrable to motion blur if you're using a camera in very low light, and there are a lot of good software tools on the market to reduce the appearance of noise). But, the Nikon does a pretty good job at keeping noise levels down through ISO 1600 compared to most models.

You may want to see what the KM bodies are selling for, too. Since Konica Minolta has exited the camera business, you can often find them at very low prices, and a KM DSLR would give you anti-shake with every lens, a reasonably low noise profile, as well as ISO speeds up to ISO 3200 (missing on models like the Rebel XT and Nikon D50).

Sony will be introducing DSLR models that can use Minolta AF lenses this summer. So, stay tuned for Sony DSLR product announcements (most likely in early June).

Note that I'm biased since I have a KM 5D. ;-)

Try out cameras you consider in a store if one is around that stocks them. Each user will have different preferences in a camera, and you want to make sure you get one that "feels right" to you.


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Old May 7, 2006, 10:41 AM   #6
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I purchased the D50 refurbished from Cametta on EBAY, Couldn't tell it from a new one, I've probally shot over a 1000 pics now great little camera. I would suggest getting the 18-55 and either the 55-200 or the 70-300 lens, I got mine with the 28-80 and now want something a little wider. The 70-300 is a good lens havn't had a bit of problems with it so far. Good luck in your decisions Greg
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Old May 7, 2006, 10:50 AM   #7
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Another thing to worry about with refurbished is shutter life. I've read about a guy who got a supposedly-store demo camera, but when it arrived, the firmware showed 30K clicks. The shutter died within weeks, and he had to send it to Nikon to be fixed (under warranty).

Personally, I've seen how customers and employees of my local Best Buy set the store cameras to continuous mode and just hold the shutter for 20+ clicks at a time, not knowing that it's the weakest link of a camera's lifespan.

Too bad stores do not advertise a Refurbished-camera's actuation count the way used cars' mileage counts are advertised.

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Old May 7, 2006, 11:05 AM   #8
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Well... a store demo is one thing. A factory reconditioned model is not the necessarily the same thing.

When a customer purchases and returns a camera, many stores send them back versus trying to sell them as used. They are checked out to make sure they are functioning up to new camera standards, repackaged and sold as factory reconditioned.

Since most stores have a short period that they allow returns, most of these cameras have seen very little use.

Sure, you could get one with a lot of shutter actuations. But, I'd think that would apply to a very small percentage of Factory Reconditioned cameras.

The biggest downside to a factory reconditioned camera is the warranty period (90 days versus 1 year).

But, an advantage to a factory (not store) reconditioned camera is that it's been checked out twice for proper operation (since it's checked over thoroughly when reconditioned). Since most electronics tend to fail relatively soon in their life cycle if a component is defective, I'd think that they'd be more likely to continue working fine until moving parts begin to wear out.

Personally, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a genuine factory reconditioned Nikon camera, if it were a model I was shopping for (and I have bought a factory reconditioned camera from Nikon before via their http://www.nikonmall.com web site, where they sell them directly to the public).

But, you can usually get a better deal from a vendor selling their factory reconditioned models (Nikon has gone up a lot in the past few years on the models they sell direct, probably because their dealers complained about the competition).


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