Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 9, 2006, 8:19 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2
Default

Hi,
started to use the manual mode of my Nikon D50 recently.Can't figure out how to dial in exposure compensation in manual mode.When i press the aperture button and turn the command dial as given in the manual only the aperture changes.Am I missing something obvious? Any help appreciated.

thanks in advance
bala01
Bala01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 9, 2006, 8:38 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Mooshie2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 13
Default

I don't know if it's obvious, but exposure compensation is only availible in P, S and A modes.
Mooshie2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 8:51 AM   #3
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Using Manual Exposure, you control both Aperture and Shutter Speed. Your Exposure Compensation is those two variables. ;-) If you want a brighter or darker image than the camera is metering, use different settings, while watching the meter in the viewfinder.

Exposure Compensation lets you alter the way a camera's autoexposure algorithms expose animage (brighten or darken it compared to the way the camera meteredthe scene). It's one of my most frequently used settings on most cameras.

A +EV value gives you a brighter exposure. The camera uses a slower shutter speed and/or larger aperture to get a brighter exposure, compared to what the camera's autoexposure algorithms would have selected.

A -EV value gives you a darker exposure. The camera uses a faster shutter speed and/or smaller aperture to get a darker exposure, compared to what the camera's autoexposure algorithms would have selected.

If you're in Av Mode and use Exposure Compensation, the camera will vary the shutter speed (since you're setting the aperture). If you're using Tv mode and use Exposure Compensation, the camera will vary the Aperture (since you're controlling the shutter speed).

If you're in Auto (or other similar modes), the camera may vary aperture or shutter speed when you use Exposure Compensation.

Correct Exposure comes down to the amount of light, the ISO speed, and the aperture. A variety of combinations will produce identical exposure. You only need to use Exposure Compensation if you want a brighter or darker image compared to what the camera's autoexposure would normally give you in the same conditions.

An example of when you may want to use a +EV setting is for a backlit subject, where the subject would normally be much darker than the rest of the image. Since the camera has a limited dynamic range, it doesn't know that you want the dark subject exposed properly (at the expense of the rest of the image). If you brighten the exposure for one part, the rest may be overexposed.

If your subject is much brighter than the rest of the image, you may want to use a -EV setting for Exposure Compensation so that your subject is not overexposed (making the rest of the image darker, too).

The camera has a limited range of bright to dark that it can capture. So, it makes choices so that most of the iimage is correctly exposed, depending on your metering mode. Sometimes that may not be what you want. That's where exposure compensation comes in.

But, if you're using Manual Exposure, you're controlling the variables. Your exposure compensation is the shutter speed and aperture settings. ;-)

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 10:22 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Mooshie2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 13
Default

My short answer feels even shorter now...:lol:
Mooshie2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 10:24 AM   #5
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I tend to be *too* long winded. :-) Hopefully, my long answers don't confuse more than they help.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 12:05 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2
Default

Thank you Jim&Mooshie2 for setting my basics right!Between us, the long answer went a long way in setting my doubts at rest.thanks again.
Bala01
Bala01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 2:03 PM   #7
rey
Senior Member
 
rey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 949
Default

There is a typo on the D50 manual (page 47) that says "Exposure Compensation (P, S, A, and M Modes Only)". Being a newbie, it drove me crazy trying to make it work on M mode.


Also...
From what I've read, there is a "feature" on the D50 firmware, where if you have the ISO setting set to auto, even if you are in full Manual mode, the camera will change the ISO.
rey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 2:12 PM   #8
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

rey wrote:
Quote:
Also...
From what I've read, there is a "feature" on the D50 firmware, where if you have the ISO setting set to auto, even if you are in full Manual mode, the camera will change the ISO.
Hopefully, not after you make your settings for aperture and shutter speed using the camera's meter as a guide. :-)


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 6:39 PM   #9
rey
Senior Member
 
rey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 949
Default

Quote:
Hopefully, not after you make your settings for aperture and shutter speed using the camera's meter as a guide. :-)
This is my first DSLR (and SLR is general), so I don't know what the expected behavior is when exposure is in Manual mode and ISO is set to Auto. I would think it means everything is Manual, including ISO. So if the camera was set to Auto ISO, it would disable it while the camera is set in Manual mode. Right now that's not the case.

Here's the scenario that happens right now:

Say the camera is in Manual mode, and I set ISO to 200. Metering says the exposure will be underexpose. So I increase the shutter time until the camera says exposure is ideal. Well, what it actually means is that it's ideal for ISO 1600, and when I take a picture it'll record it at ISO 1600. If I keep turning the dial to increase shutter time some more, the metering will still say ideal exposure, but it'll actually end up using lower and lower ISO behind the scene. What it is exactly, I don't know. After several turns, it would have pass the ideal range and say it'll be over exposed. One click before overexposure is when it'll actually use ISO 200.

To Nikon's credit, they do blink the ISO AUTO the whole time.

I read this from Ken Rockwell, he says it's a firmware bug, and it's also in D70/D70s. I didn't really think much of it, until I took some pics recently and my early shots were taken on ISO 1600. Good thing I check my histogram and exif data often.

Anyways, so what's the ideal behavior? Should Manual mode mean Manual Mode, including ISO? I wonder if other Nikon DSLRs have the same behavior, or only those aimed for entry level consumers.

rey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2006, 6:54 PM   #10
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

They may be doing something like setting ISO speed higher when you set a shutter speed that was faster than when it read the lighting and it thought that it needed to increase ISO speed to provide that shutter speed at the aperture you've got dialed in using manual exposure to try and keep it inside of a range of under or overexposure.

I don't know how it's designed. You'd have to test it and see it's exact behavior and form an opinion.

If I were shooting manual exposure, I'd be using a set ISO speed versus Auto ISO anyway though.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:13 PM.