Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 20, 2006, 3:51 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 24
Default

I just had a bad experience with with a Canon S3 IS that hada severe problem and it left me not trusting the camera so I sent it back.

I am on a tight budget andhave been reading a lot of good things about the Nikon D50 as the D70 is outside my budget. I am almost ready to order but I am confused with a couple of things and have some questions.

I have only had experience with digital P&S and only really understand the zoom in terms of 3x or 12x etc that will change in time.

I think I have read somewhere that a 18-55MM is similar to the x3 magnification.



What is the 18-70mm similar to in terms of zoom magnification?

What is the difference between the f/3.5-4.5 and the f/3.5-5.6 on the two lens?

How would this effect my photos and what does the f/3.5-4.5 and the f/3.5-5.6 do or mean?



I am thinking of getting the D50 body and a 18-70mm instead of the one in the kit.

Any help with this would be appreciated as I am very new to DSLR cameras.



Thanks



Andy
dx90 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 20, 2006, 6:38 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

First, forget zoom in "x" terms. It is a useless, marketing designation. What "x" refers to is the longest focal length divided by the shortest. For example, as you mention, the 18-55 is a bit over 3x. But a 100-300 lens would also be 3x...obviously, these two lenses have much different fields of view. So yes, the 18-55 is a little over 3x. The 18-70 is a bit less than 4 x (3.8x to be exact). So there isn't much of a difference. When referring to DSLR's, just remember, the higher the number in focal length, the longer the telephoto reach.

F stop numbers refer to the light gathering ability of the lens. The smaller the F-stop number, the more light it allows in. This allows the camera to use faster shutter speeds in any given situation. Higher Fstop numbers do the opposite, and force the camera to use slower shutter speeds to gain proper exposure. Typically, zoom lenses largest minimum aperature becomes smaller as you use more zoom. So when you see a designation f3.5-f4.5, the largest aperature at minimum zoom is f3.5, and increases to f 4.5 at maximum zoom.

Before getting too far in, I would recommend picking up a good book on the basics of photography. In order to use a DSLR effectively (and to know what equipment you will need for the type of shooting you do) you need to understand how aperature (f-stop) shutter speeds, and ISO affect exposure.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 20, 2006, 9:55 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 24
Default

So the 18-70mm is the better lens when used at full zoom because it lets more light in and allows me to use a faster shutter speed. But at minimum zoom they would both work similar. Is this correct?

I want to use the camera at the beginning to photograph thegarden such as flowers and insects to start with and family portraits.

Further down the line It will be wildlife birds etc but I will need to think about the correct lens for that.

Do you have any book titles you could recommend?

What lens out of the 18-55mm or the 18-70mm would you recommend for me to begin with?

Many thanks


dx90 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 20, 2006, 1:39 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 89
Default

Yes 18-70mm is better than 18-55mm if you are getting 18-70mm without extra costs.
If you are looking for wildlife photography, better to get a wider range lens. Nikon 18-200mm VR is a very good allround lens but costs almost double than a Sigma or Tamron (Non VR) lens in the same range.

Macro photography is more interesting when you have something like Micro Nikkor 60mm or Tamron 90mm Macro. And finally like many Nikonians in the forum (including my self) get a Nikon 50/1.8 lens. Not only that it is cheap(100$) but also a damn good lens for portraits and low light photograpy.
Swedson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 21, 2006, 5:51 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 24
Default

Just been looking around at the price difference between getting the 18-55mm and the 18-70mm with the body and its around £120 difference so I will have to go with the kit lens 18-55mm.

I have beentold about adapters that can add x2 or x3 to the the end of the lens of the 18-55mm.

Is there such a lens adapter and if yes what sort would fit the D50 camera and lens?

The camera is mainly for my son who's taking photography at school at the end of the summer. The budget this way is very tight but it is something he really wants to do. I am just trying to explore all my options before buying.
dx90 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 21, 2006, 6:30 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

You can use a teleconverter to get more focal length. However, that reduces the amount of light coming in on an already kinda slow lens, and will reduce sharpness and AF speed. You're better off adding a second telezoom lens to get additional reach.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 21, 2006, 11:44 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 24
Default

I think I will leave the teleconverter and get a telezoom lens later in the year.



Thanks
dx90 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 23, 2006, 6:42 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
tommysdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 714
Default

I upgraded my Kodak DX6490 , 10x zoom with a TCON 17 tele converter to a Nikon D50.I thought I would miss the long zoom, to be honest I don`t.
I have a Tamron 18-200 XR Di II ( my longest lens), very rarely have I shot at 200mm

TD

tommysdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 25, 2006, 8:46 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 32
Default

I bought the D50 with the 18-55 kit lens and the reason for this was the price; the kit was being offered locally for a limited time for a reasonable cost. Since then I bought the 50mm 1.8 lens, but so far have not used it much.

Admittedly, I miss the extra zoom range with the 18-55 kit lens, but for most of my shooting purposes around the house it is sufficient. I don't think I would spend more money for the 18-70mm myself, instead I would rather save up for a good lens with a longer max range than 70mm. So for my vote, the 18-55mm kit lens is a good first lens.

Steve, Denmark
sti_sti is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:58 AM.