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Old Jun 23, 2006, 1:10 PM   #11
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Hi Rey, quangtran1 answered this. I used bulb once a while back, so I must have forgotten how it works. Sorry about the confusion.
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 12:32 PM   #12
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Do you have to be "facing" the camera to use the remote, or can you be in the back of it? Sorry about the dumb question. I'd like to use it to take pictures of the birds at my bird feeder, while I'm hidden, be easier if I'm not having to face the camera.
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 12:40 PM   #13
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Sue,
It depends on: 1) How strong your remote can transmit the infrared signal, and 2) Is there a wall or something that the signal can bounce off to get back to the camera sensor?

When using my remote inside a normal-sized room, I can point (hide) my remote practically anywhere and it still works. However, when taking bird pictures in open space, it's pretty difficult to activate the shutter from behind the camera. What I myself do is to position the camera facing a large tree, then I'd hide behind the tree.
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 12:41 PM   #14
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you do have to be facing it, in fact its pretty picky about where you have to line it up (even the lens can block it)

The sensor is just under the shutter release. on the front of the camera
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Old Jun 27, 2006, 9:26 AM   #15
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Thanks. Sounds like it might not be quite as handy as I'd hoped, but may still be worth having.
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 7:56 PM   #16
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on ebay, some of the remotes came with some reflector mirror or so that you could attach onto the camera, and this would allow you to take picture from behind the camera if you are outdoors i think
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Old Jul 1, 2006, 12:47 AM   #17
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Somewhere on Stevesforum was a picture of a piece of a shiny silver CD attached to a d50 that allowed for the person to stand behind the camera, activate the remote and have the IR beam be reflected onto the sensor. Necessity being the mother of all invention, I'm sure one could figure how to juryrig something!

edit-- well, it was for a d70. See http://stevesforums.com/forums/view_...ight=cd+remote.
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Old Jul 1, 2006, 6:51 AM   #18
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Geeee-nius!
I've been using a paper plate to bounce off the remote signal. I cut a hole in the middle of the plate and slide it onto the lens. However, the shiny CD sure looks a lot better.
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Old Aug 7, 2006, 5:09 PM   #19
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Inspired by this thread, my husband went to work making a better mousetrap. There is another thread that mentions using a cd, paperclip, and rubberband to make a mirror to enable you to use the remote from behind a D50 or 70. We tried this, but found it somewhat unwieldy and we couldn't hold the cdpiece steady in a tiny breeze. So - here's our solution.







We bought a 3" putty knife at the local store, and cut the handle off, then attached a small bracket. Then we took a length of velcro that we had in the garage and wrapped it around the lens, and slid the bracket under the velcro, and into place, and tightened the velcro. This will hold the shiny knife in place without bending, and will reflect the IR remote, yet can be quickly removed and replaced, and can be carried in your kit easily. Below shows the parts. One note, after working with the metal putty knife, my husband said next time he would use a plastic putty knife and would wrap it with reflective tape.




Now, my question is, how do you focus on something that isn't there yet? Here is a photo I took at our birdfeeder using the remote and attachment mentioned above. I know it's not level, that's because the birdfeeder isn't level. But I'm not happy with the focus on the redbird. I think it may be because I used autofocus, and the camera didn't have time to focus? Any help would be appreciated.






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