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Old Jul 6, 2006, 8:50 PM   #1
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What features would one miss out on by going to d50 as compared to competitor or even higher end Nikons? Speed? Raw? Customization? Anything?
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Old Jul 6, 2006, 10:05 PM   #2
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It's missing ISO 3200 as you'd get on some of the competing models like the Konica Minolta 5D and 7D, any Pentax DSLR model, and the next step up in Nikon and Canon models (Nikon D70s, Canon EOS-20D, EOS-30D).

It's got a smaller viewfinder compared to most DSLR models like the Konica Minolta and Pentax Models (and more advanced models from Canon and Nikon). The Olympus models have smaller viewfinders, though.

It's got some metadata related to White Balance in raw files encrypted (but, this is not a "real world" problem anymore since most 3rd party software manufacturers have cracked the encryption and Adobe compromised and worked out an agreement for a Software Developers Kit). This is true for a number of newer Nikon models (Nikon encrypts data related to white balance in raw files from the D50, D2x, D2Hs and D200). Older Nikon models didn't have this issue (Nikon started doing this type of thing beginning with the D2x).

You'd have to compare buffer size on a camera by camera basis. But, it compares well to most entry level models (although write speed to media in Megabytes/second with some models like the Konica Minolta 5D is more than twice as fast after the buffer is full).

It's missing anti-shake like the Konica Minolta models have with any lens (but, Nikon offers some lenses with VR/Vibration Reduction built in).

There are pros and cons to any of them, and the D50 is a well liked camera by it's owners and has very good detail retention at higher ISO speeds.

If you compare it with higher end models like the Nikon D200 or Canon EOS-30D, you'll start to see a lot more difference (buffer size, AF performance, frame rates, etc.). But, cost difference will be greater, too.

Higher end models also tend to have better build quality, PC Sync Ports for attaching studio strobes, more external controls, larger and brighter viewfinders, faster write speeds to memory cards, faster Autofocus systems, etc. But, you may or may not need those types of features for the way you use a camera.


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Old Jul 7, 2006, 11:47 AM   #3
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- ISO 50, 100 (just in case you need even cleaner images, or longer exposures)

- Panel LED lighting

- Depth Of Field preview

- Mirror-lockup for silently taking pictures (I don't mean that for cleaning the CCD)

- Programmable Quick Function Buttons


Paradoxically these limitations MAY in turn sum up to make the body lighter/smaller, so the last deficiency maybe:

- Not light-weight enough
(having cut so many features, but can only save 60g compared with D70)


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Old Jul 7, 2006, 12:25 PM   #4
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potato,
can you elaborate with a real world example where these lower ISO settings would be of benefit.

also, depth of field preview??? Blank on that one.

thanks
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Old Jul 7, 2006, 12:38 PM   #5
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A feature where you press a button and the lens stops down to the chosen aperture. Theoretically you can assess the depth of field. In reality you get a very dark picture and can see nothing. I had that "feature" on my film SLRs and don't mind not having it on my D50. If you want to check out the depth of field - take the picture & look at the preview.

Keith.

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also, depth of field preview??? Blank on that one.
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Old Jul 7, 2006, 12:40 PM   #6
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Depth of Field Preview allows you to see the impact of the aperture you're using in the viewfinder (to some extent).

With my Konica Minolta 5D, I can press a button on the front of the camera, and it stops down the aperture to the settings a camera would use.

The idea is to see how much depth of field you have with the camera settings that will be used to take the photo (how much of the image is accceptably sharp in front of and behind the camera's focus point).

Modern lenses focus with the aperture wide open (where your depth of field will be shallowest), only closing the aperture to the desired setting when you take the photo. So, depth of field preview is a feature some photographers like.

I don't put much weight in it with an entry level DSLR model, since the viewfinders are not really good enough to judge depth of field accurately with anyway.

As for lower ISO speeds being useful, if you are trying to do things like blur running water with a slower shutter speed in bright daylight, it can allow you to use a greater variety of apertures (or shoot with less in the way of filters) in order to get the slower shutter speeds desired.

Ditto if you want to shoot at wide open apertures for depth of field purposes (as in shooting portraits) to help your subjects stand out from background distractions in bright light. You can get a slower shutter speed if desired if you have a slower ISO speed available for any given aperture.

In some bright lighting, you can "run out" of available shutter speeds with a bright prime at wide open apertures (exceed the fastest shutter speed a camera is capable of). So, there are advantages to lower available ISO speeds in some conditions.

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Old Jul 7, 2006, 12:47 PM   #7
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Low ISO benefits e.g.:

1. Under broad day light, if you want to use long exposure to make a painting-like waterfall (the white water bubbles being "smoothened" out by long exposure), e.g. 5 sec, even if you set the smallest aperture, at ISO 200, your pciture would still have a large chance of being over-exposed. Or you may need to further reduce the exposure by e.g. polarized filters. Lower ISO may avoid such clumsiness.

2. At ISO200 I noticed some shade area background still have much noise. I expect the noise would be gone at lower ISO.


Just a 2 cents of stupid opinions
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Old Jul 7, 2006, 2:03 PM   #8
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Obviously my film SLR viewfinders were rubbish then and it wasn't the fact that the viewfinder image when stopped down was 1/64th of the brightness of the surroundings that prevented me from finding it a useful feature.

Keith.

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I don't put much weight in it with an entry level DSLR model, since the viewfinders are not really good enough to judge depth of field accurately with anyway.
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Old Jul 7, 2006, 3:31 PM   #9
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The only thing I'd really like to add to my D50 is an on-demand focusing grid. Lighted top panel would be nice as would DOF preview but I can live without them.
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 8:25 AM   #10
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A Battery Grip is not available from what I have seen.
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