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Old Aug 5, 2006, 3:52 PM   #21
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I think the D50 and D70s does use the same sensors, but there are more to image processing than sensors. That's why I don't pay attention to those who say that Sony's 10.2 MP camera is just as good as Nikon's D200 simply because the sensors are the same. Nikon modifies the Sony sensor for their own use. Nikon also uses their own image processor. Canon has a marketing gimmick of naming theirs "Digic 3", Sony gave theirs a name also, but Nikon has the worst marketing team out there and they didn't bother giving theirs a name that they can market to people. I laugh when I see side by side comparisons on magz and they point out that Canon has "Digic processor" while the Nikon box has "None". Wow, a camera without an image processor, that's amazing!

Being in tech industry, I see through all these noises, and BS, since we use that a lot to trick customers. Then again, I'm an engineer and make a lot less than marketing folks.

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Old Aug 5, 2006, 4:33 PM   #22
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I find it kind of humorous with all the choices we are getting there are still those that are very much into minutia with how cameras are made.

The D80 will be a fine camera but hopefully it won't have that dreadful supply issue that Nikon seems to have with their cameras especially the D200.

Both Canon and Nikon will keep their image stabilization in their line of lenses and obviously performs well.

Image stabilization in the bodies of the Sony/Minolta, and Pentax cameras show it can perform well too.

It just comes down to the matter of what glass you may already have or what minutia you can or can't live with or without.

All the cameras produce excellent results.


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Old Aug 6, 2006, 2:06 AM   #23
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In all honesty, do you think that the new Nikon D80 will be better than the D50???

The main aspects of a dSLR is the largeimage sensor and in that; the dynamic range, high ISO performance, image quality, andbokeh.

We definitely want the larger pixels or photodetectors in a dSLR which we cannot have in out ultra compactsthat is why we are paying for one isn't it? We are photographers and we want to capture the best pictures with themost capable image sensors and lens combination right? (The light tunnel must be great in qualityfor it toreceive great quality images).

I don't think that the Nikon D80's image sensorwill have larger photon-detectors than the D50's because the size will be exackly the same. The dynamic range physically will also be lower due to those smaller photodiodes. I remember reading the advantages of larger pixels (Photon detectors) that it provides better per pixel sharpness, detail capturing, and dynamic range etc...In the end, the larger the image sensor, the better it is unless it is cramped up with small pixels. The best is a large image sensor with low mega-pixel counts. (Atleast from my research). That is why photographers desire the larger pixels of the dSLR right? (It has it's advantage). Read in this link>>> http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ensor-size.htm

Obviously we can expect it to have more features like WB fine tuning (Something you can perform better in photoshop according to photographers), status LCD backlight (Surely not a serious enoughissue to make decisions?), extra mega-pixels to 10 MP (Depends whether you need it or not but have to put up with the isues mentioned above), mirror lock up feature (how significant?), dept of field preview (I heard this feature is useless on APS-C dSLRs because it doesn't make a difference), and the D200's viewfinder (Now that is something that might probably make the DOF preview feature more useful?).

The camera is also priced at 900 USD andwith that kind ofcost, it will cut down on lens quality for those with that budget rangeor infact leave you without a lens at all unless you start buying 50 dollars plastics lens for it...that is working far too hard and strainings to get just mediocre results that won't last long. On the other hand, a Nikon D50 with good glassto match it'ssuperior image sensor...think how prolific will that be. (I don't owned theD50 BTW but it has the liberty toland in my hands and be used as a great tool).

Finally, photographers choose to step up to the dSLRs because they want high ISO performance. I don't believe that on a dSLR. we should be worried to select the high or highest ISOs as we did onthe ultra compacts. I believe that dSLRs should havefully usable and worry free ISOs values to select from (including the max ISO). It shouldn't trouble us. On the other hand, dSLRs like the EVOLT E-500, Alpha A100, Nikon D200, EVOLT E-330,andsome others are behaving rather like consumers here with some worryful ISOs at the 800 to 1600 range...What about the upcoming D80?

BTW, seems like some is arguing in here;

The image sensor of the Nikon D50 and D70s are different according to Nikon and dpreview. The D50's CCD have a thicker AA filter over it. You know that rainbow and luminating like panel above theimage sensor? Well,that is now thicker on the D50's new CCD. The new D50 chip design helps to eliminate most of the moires on the D70s images and I thing judging by the noise and dynamic range, that has all gone better as well on the D50. Both cameras display the same amount of imagedetail according to dpreview.




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Old Aug 8, 2006, 12:38 PM   #24
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ZERO days left for the new Nikon dSLR to be introduce>>> :arrow:!!! :!:

http://www.nikon-asia.com/teaser/Teaser.html




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Old Aug 9, 2006, 5:20 AM   #25
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Don't freedom-fry me if the below is fake press release. But I read it in many photo websites today:

Nikon D80 (News Release)






Nikon D80 -- Outstanding performance, ease of operation, versatile personal control and exciting in-camera effects
make digital SLR photography more rewarding for all
Tokyo — Nikon Corporation is pleased to introduce the D80. Incorporating Nikon's latest digital and photographic technologies, this new high-performance interchangeable-lens digital SLR camera features automated operation and advanced features designed to satisfy any photographer with the passion to create beautiful photographs and preserve special moments.

The D80 features a new 10.2 effective megapixel DX Format CCD image sensor, bringing a new level of high resolution and sharp detail to the class while also providing plenty of freedom to crop creatively and print impressive enlargements. Nikon's DX Format sensor and Nikon F bayonet lens mount design assure unprecedented compatibility across the comprehensive assortment of AF Nikkor lenses and DX Nikkor lenses designed exclusively for Nikon digital SLR cameras.



One of the key advances developed for the D80 is Nikon's own high-resolution image processing engine. Advantages inherited from Nikon's latest professional digital SLR cameras include color independent analog pre-conditioning and high-precision 12-bit digital image processing algorithms, which combine to produce natural-looking images that benefit from faithful color and tone reproduction. A new dedicated high-performance processing chip greatly accelerates performance on all levels, while also achieving lower power consumption, assuring more pictures per battery charge.



Nikon's exclusive 3D Color Matrix Metering II ensures accurate automatic exposure control for ideal exposures, even in the most challenging lighting conditions. Evaluating, rather than merely measuring or averaging the true content of each scene, input from the system's frame-wide 420-pixel sensor is automatically referenced against an onboard database of over 30,000 scenes from actual photography to calculate final exposure value. Variable center-weighted metering and spot metering centered on the active focus area are also available, as are exposure compensation and auto exposure bracketing. Sophisticated exposure automation combined with options for complete user control help to make the D80 an ideal high-performance digital SLR for passionate photography enthusiasts.



Advanced Auto White Balance (AWB) produces natural coloration by measuring the entire frame of each scene and matching white balance to the light source. For those who wish greater personal control, the flexible options include a choice of six specific manual settings, (Incandescent, Fluorescent, Direct Sunlight, Flash, Cloudy, and Shade), as well as a preset option for using a gray or white object as a reference.



Ensuring consistently fast and precise focus lock under varying shooting conditions is the D80's refined 11-area AF system. Adopting a refined version of Nikon's advanced Multi-CAM 1000 AF Sensor Module, this new 11-area AF system adds effective new focusing options that will instill greater confidence in getting the desired shot. For example, while the system is able to use each of its 11 focus areas individually, the center sensor can also be switched to wide-frame operation for broader coverage. New Auto-area AF mode measures all 11 focus areas, automatically determines which of them are on the primary subject, and activates only those areas.



Ready to shoot whenever that priceless expression or special moment presents itself, the D80 takes only 0.18 seconds to power up. And, the shutter's minimal release lag time of approx. 80 milliseconds delivers instant response while shooting, as does the fast and precise focus of the refined 11-area AF system with AF-assist illuminator. Images are processed instantly and recorded quickly to the inserted SD memory card. Preview images are also displayed near instantly.



Continuous shooting at a rapid 3 frames per second in bursts of up to 100 JPEG (FINE M-size or smaller) images makes action photography a reality.



Packing high performance and high resolution into a slimmer, more compact body, the D80 also remains true to Nikon's commitment to intuitive operation. The size, layout and operation of all buttons and controls are designed for maximum ease of use.



The D80 features a large and bright viewfinder with large 0.94x magnification to ensure the clearest view possible for precise composition. Included is a built-in diopter adjustment control knob also makes it easier to fine-tune the view to match eyesight. The viewfinder's integrated grid display can also be turned on to assist composition.



A large new 2.5-inch 230,000-dot high-resolution LCD provides an ultra-wide 170-degree viewing angle from all directions. A new dedicated Zoom button makes it easy to preview images and assess sharpness at up to 25 times magnification. A new RGB histogram display aids in evaluating exposures with greater precision. Other playback options include single frame, 4 or 9-image thumbnail display, an improved histogram display and highlight point display.



The D80 also adds built-in Standard or Advanced Pictmotion slideshow options, which includes style selections that control transitions and background music. Shows can be enjoyed on the 2.5-inch LCD, or complete with audio on a television when connected via the supplied AV cable.



A new menu interface featuring refinements to the carefully chosen color scheme and increased font size makes navigation easier on the eye, easier to understand and easier to use. Menus can be customized to display only selected items using the new "My Menu" set.



Exclusive in-camera image editing features under the new Retouch menu help ensure consistently satisfying results and greater creative freedom without the use of a computer. D-Lighting automatically brings out detail to enhance results and add creative flair, all while optimizing overall exposure balance. Red-eye correction automatically detects and compensates for the annoying red-eye effect sometimes caused by flash. Trim can be used to produce smaller files for easy sharing or greater efficiency. Image Overlay merges a pair of selected RAW (NEF) files taken with the D80 to create a new composite image. Other options include Monochrome settings (Black-and-white, Sepia, Cyanotype) and Filter Effects (Skylight, Warm filter, Color balance).



Multiple Exposure is a new shooting option that creates a single image within the camera from up to 3 consecutive exposures, producing an effect automatically that resembles multiple exposure techniques used with film.



Creative photography is as simple as rotating the mode dial with the D80's selection of seven automated Digital Vari-Programs. Choose from Auto, Portrait, Landscape, Close Up, Sports, Night Landscape, or Night Portrait and the selected program automatically optimizes white balance, sharpening, tone (contrast), color, saturation and hue settings to best match the shot. The D80 also offers personal control over image optimization settings, with user-selectable menu settings for the Normal, Softer, Vivid, More vivid, Portrait, Custom and Black-and-white options.



The powerful built-in flash employs Nikon's highly robust i-TTL flash control for greater precision in flash exposure evaluation that achieves better automatic flash balance. i-TTL flash control also helps realize built-in features such as Repeating flash function for creating stroboscopic effects and the Modeling Flash, which allows photographers to visually assess overall lighting and shadow conditions prior to shooting. Full support for the Advanced Wireless Lighting System lets the built-in flash function as a two-group remote commander that provides direct control over wireless SB-800 or SB-600 Speedlights.



The inherent advantages of the D80 combine with the empowering and creatively inspiring components of Nikon's Total Digital Imaging System to deliver a new level of operating ease, expanded creative possibilities, and pure enjoyment. This of course begins with the lineup of interchangeable high-quality AF and DX Nikkor lenses. It extends to maximizing the potential of Nikon's Creative Lighting System, offering benefits such as i-TTL flash control, Advanced Wireless Lighting, highly reliable FV Lock and Auto FP High-Speed Sync, and enabling high-precision flash photography with SB-800, SB-600 and SB-R200 Speedlights.



Convenient and practical Total Imaging System add-ons include the new MB-D80 Multi-Power Battery Pack. Featuring an ergonomic design that blends added stability with extended shooting potential and more comfortable shooting in vertical format. The Wireless ML-L3 (IR) Remote Control and MC-DC1 Remote Cord options provide necessary camera stability when using long exposures, such as for landscape and macro photography.



Nikon's PictureProject software, provided with every purchase of a Nikon D80, enables easy image importing, editing, organization and sharing. Design templates make it easy to produce prints, tailor images to e-mail, or layout several images on a page to produce creative album layouts.



Capture NX (available for purchase separately) is Nikon's highly versatile and elegantly simple new photo editing solution designed for those who desire more creative control over post-processing and to help photographers tap the full potential of NEF (RAW) images. Featuring an innovative user interface that provides easier access to powerful and visually intuitive enhancement tools, Capture NX's powerful photo image processing and editing tools can also be applied to JPEG and TIFF files to satisfy a broader range of photofinishing needs and applications.


The Nikon D80 beautifully combines the best of latest advances in digital technology with ease of operation and quick and efficient camera handling. Add to this the advantages of Nikon's Total Imaging System and every aspiring photographer is certain to enjoy the Nikon digital SLR experience as much as the superb pictures produced with the D80.

Note: Specifications and equipment are subject to change without any notice or obligation on the part of the manufacturer.




Nikon D80 Major Features


Exceptional imaging quality

New 10.2 effective megapixel Nikon DX Format CCD image sensor with the power to capture exceptional sharpness and faithful color at 3,872 x 2,592 pixels size.
Inherits the industry-leading advanced imaging processing engine of Nikon professional D-SLR cameras. Color-independent pre-conditioning prior to A/D conversion works in harmony with high-precision digital image processing algorithms to produce natural-looking images that benefit from faithful color and tone reproduction.
3D Color Matrix Metering II automatic exposure control ensures ideal exposures in most lighting conditions. Evaluating brightness, color, contrast, selected focus area and camera-to-subject distance, the system references the data against an expanded onboard database created using data from more than 30,000 actual photographic scenes to instantly and accurately calculate the final exposure value for the shot. Variable center-weighted metering and spot metering centered on the active focus area are also available.

Refined 11-area AF system packs the same number of focus areas available for the professional D2 series into a space-efficient system that features fast, precise operation. Each of the 11 focus areas can be used individually, the center sensor can be switched to wide-frame operation for broader coverage, and new Auto-area AF mode measures all 11 focus areas, automatically determines which of them are on the primary subject and activates only those areas.

ISO AUTO mode automatically adjusts sensitivity between ISO 100 to 1600 to maximize available light and achieve optimal exposure. Sensitivity can also be set manually between ISO 100 to 1600 in steps of 1/3 EV, plus HI-0.3, HI-0.7 and HI-1. Three levels of High ISO Noise Reduction are available when shooting at high ISO settings. Long Exposure Noise Reduction is also available when shooting at shutter speeds of 8 seconds or slower.

Optimized and Predictable Results

Seven automated Digital Vari-Programs easily accessed from the Mode Dial provide automatic operation that optimizes white balance, sharpening, tone, color, saturation and hue for crisp and vivid results that match the intended shot. Selections include Auto, Portrait, Landscape, Close Up, Sports, Night Landscape and Night Portrait.
Easily accessed image optimization options closely tailor results to the scene at hand or the intended use of the image. Image sharpening, tone (contrast) compensation, color mode, saturation and hue adjustment is controlled by the user-selected choice of Normal, Softer, Vivid, More vivid, Portrait, Custom and Black-and-white.

Immediate response and fast performance

Near instant power-up of 0.18 seconds lets photographers respond to any shutter opportunities.
A mere 80-millisecond shutter time lag (approximate) promotes fast handling.

Swift continuous shooting performance at 3 frames per second* enables the shooting of up to 100 JPEG (FINE M-size or smaller) or up to 6 RAW (NEF) images.
* Average frame rate with continuous-servo AF, manual or shutter-priority auto exposure, a shutter speed of 1/250 seconds or faster, and remaining buffer memory.

Shutter speeds ranging from 1/4,000 to 30 seconds or bulb setting provide full creative control.

In-camera image editing and effects

Creative in-camera effects and editing functions available under the new Retouch menu:
D-Lighting automatically brings out detail to enhance results and add creative flair, all while optimizing overall exposure balance.

Red-eye correction automatically detects and compensates for the annoying red-eye effect sometimes caused by flash.

Trim can be used to produce smaller files for easy sharing or greater efficiency for specific end purposes.

Image Overlay merges a pair of selected RAW (NEF) files taken with the D80 to create a new composite image that can be saved in RAW or JPEG format.

Monochrome settings (Black-and-white, Sepia, Cyanotype)

Filter Effects (Skylight, Warm filter, Color balance)

Multiple Exposure creates a single image within the camera from up to 3 consecutive exposures to produce imaginative and even surreal results.

Ergonomics for efficient handling and further versatility

The D80 features a slimmer, more compact body with the size, layout and operation of all buttons and controls designed for intuitive operation.

A large new 2.5-inch LCD monitor with a 170˚ viewing angle and new dedicated zoom button assist accurate and easy assessment of sharpness by enabling image preview at up to 25 times magnification (for L-size images). Convenient displays include RGB information as a single histogram display or as separate histograms for each color channel.

Built-in slideshow options include Advanced Pictmotion shows with style selections that control transitions and background music, and that can be enjoyed on the 2.5-inch LCD, or complete with audio on a television via the supplied AV cable.

The carefully chosen color scheme and increased font size of the new color-coded menu display makes navigation easier on the eye, easier to understand and easier to use. "My Menu" lets you customize Menus to display only the items you wish to see.

Bright pentaprism viewfinder with large 0.94x magnification ensures the clearest view possible for precise composition.

Nikon's EN-EL3e rechargeable lithium-ion battery delivers enough power to support the shooting of up to 2,700* images on a single charge, can be recharged at any time and features a handy real-time fuel gauge system display that shows remaining charge by percentage, number of shots since last charge and overall battery status.

* Achieved under the following test conditions: Fully charged EN-EL3e battery; temperature of 20°C/68°F; Zoom-Nikkor AF-S DX 18-135mm f/3.5-4.5G IF-ED lens; continuous shooting mode: continuous-servo autofocus; image quality set to JPEG BASIC; image size set to Medium; shutter speed 1/250 second; shutter release pressed halfway for three seconds and focus cycled from infinity to minimum range three times with each shot; monitor turned on for five seconds after six shots and then turned off; cycle repeated once exposure meters turned off.

Seamless integration with Nikon's Total Imaging System

Unprecedented compatibility with Nikon's lineup of AF Nikkor lenses and digital-exclusive DX Nikkor lenses. (When used with the D80 or any DX Format SLR, all AF and DX Nikkor lenses have a picture angle comparable to 1.5x that of 35mm [135] format.)

Compatibility with the Nikon Creative Lighting System allows the D80 to work seamlessly with SB-800, SB-600 and SB-R200 Speedlights to deliver the benefits of i-TTL flash control's advanced monitor pre-flash, accurate measurement for bounce and versatile wireless operation. SB-800 and SB-600 Speedlights also offer a Wide-Area AF-assist Illuminator, which aids flash photography in dim light by projecting a pattern of red light that covers all eleven autofocus areas of the D80's 11-area Multi-CAM 1000 AF Sensor Module.

The optional MB-D80 battery pack adds extended shooting capability in an ergonomic design that adds shooting stability. Able to run on either one or two EN-EL3e batteries or six AA-size batteries*, the pack also features an additional command dial and alternative buttons for shutter release and AE-Lock/AF-Lock that make vertical shooting more comfortable.

* Compatible AA-size batteries comprise alkaline, Ni-MH, lithium and nickel-manganese batteries.

PictureProject (complimentary with camera) software features an intuitive user interface that provides fast and easy access to powerful tools for organizing, editing and sharing images. Auto Enhance and other creative functions are readily available via handy buttons, as are Mail, Slideshow and CD/DVD burning functions. Pictures can be organized using simple drag ‘n' drop operation, and can be quickly located by name, keyword, or date. Design templates make it easy to produce prints, tailor images to e-mail, or layout several images on a page to produce creative album layouts.

Capture NX (available for purchase separately) is Nikon's highly versatile and elegantly simple new photo editing solution designed to help photographers tap the full potential of NEF (RAW) images. Featuring an innovative user interface that provides easier access to powerful and visually intuitive enhancement tools, Capture NX's powerful photo image processing and editing tools can also be applied to JPEG and TIFF files to satisfy a broader range of photofinishing needs and applications.

©2006 Nikon Corporation
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Old Aug 10, 2006, 4:22 AM   #26
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I have run a comparison between it, the Sony alpha, and the d200. As far as noise goes, the d80 at 1600 ISO was far better than the alpha, and fairly similar to the d200. 100 and 200 ISO were fantastic images.
Being completely neutral to this whole issue, I don't think that the Nikon D200 performs better at higher ISO than the Sony Alpha A100>>> http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydslra100/page28.asp

So if the Nikon D80 is rather smiler to the D200 in this aspect, then it should well be smiler to the A100 as well. (If the A100 will not be better). Currently the A100 maintains more image details at the higher ISOs than the D200.

All dSLRs including theprosumerscaptures fantastic/superbimages at ISO 100 and 200 lol. (Not to mention thehigher quality ones). I would like to hear that (Statement) from ISO 400 on-wards where the Nikon D50, D70s, and the EOS 350D (To just name a few) can continue on-wards to ISO 800 and ISO 1600/2000 with ease.

Code:
They have included d-lighting from the point and shoot cameras and the in camera red eye fix. For those not familiar with d-lighting, if you have taken a picture of a sunset for example, and it was exposed well in the sunset, but the foreground was underexposed, apply d-lighting. The image will keep the highlights colorful and boost the underexposed area, saving it as a separate image.
The Alpha A100 also have the advance dynamic range optimization controls and it doesn't need to save separate files at all. (It just works [in a flit second] as if the image sensor was capable with such broad dynamic range in the first place). The Sony A100 doesn't poseany red eye problems; why does the D80 includes red eye software in the camera (It is more prone to it?)? (The A100 is in fact far from posing such a problem in the first place).

BTW, from a third party's opinion, I think that the Nikon D80 is ridiculously overpriced considering that the Sony Alpha A100 is now selling for just RM 3200 or just slightly less than 900 US dollars in Malaysia.The A100dSLRcomes with "Super SteadyShot, image sensor dust buster, anti-static coating on CCD to prevent dust hanging on, 2.5" 230,000 pixels clear photo LCD plus with anti-reflective coating and viewable from all angles, large and bright pentaprism TTL viewfinder with eye start AF, advance dynamic range controls, smart mirror lock up implementation, and highlight or shadow based metering.

I know that the Nikon D80 also comes with the 230,000 pixel LCD and the pentaprism viewfinder. However, it's LCD doesn't have the anti-reflective coating to be used under direct sunlight, and the eye start AF to increase thefocus speed (Since the A100 focus when you put your eyeto the viewfinder). Because the A100 is cheaper, all this has to be considered advantages on the A100's part (And the price of <900 USD includes the Sony Kit lens). I just cannot overlook that fact.

Regards. (I suggest Nikon better think again). The Sony Alpha A100 is already available with promotions everywhere.






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Old Aug 10, 2006, 9:30 AM   #27
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are you sure you had a good look at those DP images?, the link you send shows that D200 has more detail in ISO 1600 then the A100

BenjaminXYZ wrote:
[quote]
Code:
I have run a comparison between it, the Sony alpha, and the d200. As far as noise goes, the d80 at 1600 ISO was far better than the alpha, and fairly similar to the d200. 100 and 200 ISO were fantastic images.
[quote]

Being completely neutral to this whole issue, I don't think that the Nikon D200 performs better at higher ISO than the Sony Alpha A100>>> http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydslra100/page28.asp

So if the Nikon D80 is rather smiler to the D200 in this aspect, then it should well be smiler to the A100 as well. (If the A100 will not be better). Currently the A100 maintains more image details at the higher ISOs than the D200.

All dSLRs including theprosumerscaptures fantastic/superbimages at ISO 100 and 200 lol. (Not to mention thehigher quality ones). I would like to hear that (Statement) from ISO 400 on-wards where the Nikon D50, D70s, and the EOS 350D (To just name a few) can continue on-wards to ISO 800 and ISO 1600/2000 with ease.

[code]
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Old Aug 10, 2006, 5:44 PM   #28
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damm, I just bought my d70s 2 wks ago and now they come out with this? ARRGGGGGHHHHH
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Old Aug 10, 2006, 6:43 PM   #29
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clarkaim wrote:
Quote:
damm, I just bought my d70s 2 wks ago and now they come out with this? ARRGGGGGHHHHH
This has been pretty common knowledge for the last several weeks.:?
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Old Aug 11, 2006, 1:43 AM   #30
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The reason Nikon put their in camera red eye fix into the d80 isn't because Sony or any of the other guys are any better at eliminating red eye. All the big players have gotten really good at taking care of red eye, but red eye isn't some random magical occurance. Its the physics of light. Put simply, if your flash is within 6 in or 15 cm of the lens, there is a possability of red eye. Children's pupils react slower to the flash than adult's, this also causes red eye. For these reasons Nikon has put it in the d80. The d- lighting has nothing to do with an inferior chip, the d80, d200, and alpha all use the same chip. Dynamic range varies slightly because of the processor, but they are all about the same in the reguard. Not everyone knows to put a flash on with backlighting. Not everyone knows what a gradual neutral density filter is. For this reason they have put d-lighting into the d80.

As far as High ISO preformance, they may all use the same chip, but the processors are far different. Go to your local camera store. Buy a small cf card, there cheap, and put it into a d200 and the alpha. Shoot a few high ISO shots and take them home and compair them yourself!!! You'll see for yourself rather than take a websites word for it.Like I said earlier, noise wise the d200 was very similar to the pre-production model of the d80 i shot at 1600 ISO. I think we are forgeting that for the most part, the cameras in this price range are far better than there film equals in these ISO ranges. The reason I keep saying pre-production d80 isn't to brag. The d80 you buy will most likely be slightly different than the one I tested, dpreview has tested and anyone else lucky enough to get their hands on one.

BenjaminXYZ wrote:
[quote]
Code:
I have run a comparison between it, the Sony alpha, and the d200. As far as noise goes, the d80 at 1600 ISO was far better than the alpha, and fairly similar to the d200. 100 and 200 ISO were fantastic images.
[quote][quote]

Being completely neutral to this whole issue, I don't think that the Nikon D200 performs better at higher ISO than the Sony Alpha A100>>> http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydslra100/page28.asp

So if the Nikon D80 is rather smiler to the D200 in this aspect, then it should well be smiler to the A100 as well. (If the A100 will not be better). Currently the A100 maintains more image details at the higher ISOs than the D200.

All dSLRs including theprosumerscaptures fantastic/superbimages at ISO 100 and 200 lol. (Not to mention thehigher quality ones). I would like to hear that (Statement) from ISO 400 on-wards where the Nikon D50, D70s, and the EOS 350D (To just name a few) can continue on-wards to ISO 800 and ISO 1600/2000 with ease.

Code:
They have included d-lighting from the point and shoot cameras and the in camera red eye fix. For those not familiar with d-lighting, if you have taken a picture of a sunset for example, and it was exposed well in the sunset, but the foreground was underexposed, apply d-lighting. The image will keep the highlights colorful and boost the underexposed area, saving it as a separate image.
Quote:
Quote:
Quote:

The Alpha A100 also have the advance dynamic range optimization controls and it doesn't need to save separate files at all. (It just works [in a flit second] as if the image sensor was capable with such broad dynamic range in the first place). The Sony A100 doesn't poseany red eye problems; why does the D80 includes red eye software in the camera (It is more prone to it?)? (The A100 is in fact far from posing such a problem in the first place).

BTW, from a third party's opinion, I think that the Nikon D80 is ridiculously overpriced considering that the Sony Alpha A100 is now selling for just RM 3200 or just slightly less than 900 US dollars in Malaysia.The A100dSLRcomes with "Super SteadyShot, image sensor dust buster, anti-static coating on CCD to prevent dust hanging on, 2.5" 230,000 pixels clear photo LCD plus with anti-reflective coating and viewable from all angles, large and bright pentaprism TTL viewfinder with eye start AF, advance dynamic range controls, smart mirror lock up implementation, and highlight or shadow based metering.

I know that the Nikon D80 also comes with the 230,000 pixel LCD and the pentaprism viewfinder. However, it's LCD doesn't have the anti-reflective coating to be used under direct sunlight, and the eye start AF to increase thefocus speed (Since the A100 focus when you put your eyeto the viewfinder). Because the A100 is cheaper, all this has to be considered advantages on the A100's part (And the price of <900 USD includes the Sony Kit lens). I just cannot overlook that fact.

Regards. (I suggest Nikon better think again). The Sony Alpha A100 is already available with promotions everywhere.





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