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Old Aug 26, 2006, 9:20 PM   #11
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Well after multiple attempts I finally have a dust free sensor. What a pain the in the *ss that turned out to be. I would wipe and check and wipe and check then finally just put it away until another day.

The problem seemed to be that the sensor-swab has a little angle on the head and it requires you to tilt it slightly back toward you to achieve contact across the whole swab area. Well that is ok on the top half of the sensor but when you move down to the bottom half you hit against the side of the camera and therefore cannot wipe this area. I finally just did the top half of the sensor and then reloaded another wipe on the swab and turned the camera over so the bottom of the sensor was now at the top and I could wipe it successfully.

There is no way for dust to be "burned" onto a sensor. It is simply a particle on the low pass filter that can be either blown (preferred) off or wiped off.

Thanks for all the replies.

Bill
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Old Aug 27, 2006, 11:35 PM   #12
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I tried everything to get rid of the dust. The only thing that worked on my D200 was something called "Sensor Klear" by a company called Lenspen. Just Google it and you will find where to buy them. They are not expensive and they work really well.

You just rub the tip along the sensoe like you were erasing something. The only problem is that you have to make sure your battery is fully charged so you have enough time to clean the sensor. Again, I tried the sensor wipes, the swabs and that fast evaporating liquid with limited success. SensorKlear is the best.





Tony
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 1:49 AM   #13
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Mmm ! This would seem to be a problem with no easy fix, so what steps have Nikon taken to solve it before releasing the D80?

The only way I can see of stopping the dust altogether would maybe be to avoid changing the lens, so the 18-200mm zoom as a permanent fixture would maybe help?

It's a minefield out there and I'm not sure that I want to leave the safety of non-slr cameras to step foot in the dusty world of SLRs, at least not until the problem goes away for good.
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Old Aug 28, 2006, 2:44 AM   #14
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I don't think dust in the camera is that big of a deal. It is just something that anyone with an SLR has to deal with be it film or digital. If on film the fix is just a little different.

The dust in my camera came from me removing my lense on a photo shoot and cleaning my mirror with my lenspen. At least I suspect that is where it came from. I shot about 1,000 photos before dust became an issue. I only have one lens for this camera so I am not doing a lot of changing.

I believe that if you are careful and educate yourself about the dos and don'ts that dust will not be a huge issue for anyone.

I have never owned an SLR or DSLR before, so some of this is a learning experience for me. I previously shot with an 8 megapixel Nikon Coolpix 8800. It produces incredible shots that rival my D200. However, it has some limitations that I wanted to be able to do and that is why I purchased the D200 with a 17-35 f2.8. I still carry the 8800 for a backup.

Cheers,

Bill


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Old Aug 28, 2006, 3:04 AM   #15
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It is very different to film. With film if there is dust on the negative on one shot then it will move with the film when it is wound on, so the next shot will be ok. With digital if dust gets on the sensor it is there on every shot until you clean it.

Keith.

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I don't think dust in the camera is that big of a deal. It is just something that anyone with an SLR has to deal with be it film or digital. If on film the fix is just a little different.


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Old Aug 28, 2006, 3:15 AM   #16
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You are correct Keith... what really bothered me was that Nikon says to send the camera to their service center for cleaning. That is so impractical it is not even funny.

I guess what I was trying to say is that it is something that we are going to have to learn how to handle as it will happen. I wish digitals were like the film slrs in respect to the dust issue. I am a bit paranoid about checking my sensor before going on a shoot to make sure no little dust bunnies are in there.

I decided to learn how to clean the sensor myself because if I am a 1,000 miles from home on a 3 week photo vacation, sending the camera to the service center is pretty darn ludicrous. What am I going to do just stop and wait 6 weeks for Nikon to clean it and ship it back. This upset me when I first read up on what they said to do but I am over it.

So we learn how to clean/service the expensive toys we buy. Just another step in the journey of photography.. guess it is part of becoming a photographer and not a camera user or snap shot taker.
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