Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 7, 2006, 11:22 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Curmudgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: East Bay, San Francisco, CA
Posts: 889
Default

I have tried the air blower with marginal success. I am prepared to ship it to Nikon but thought I would ask for advice in here. Has anyone used a sensor wipe on this camera? What were the results? Anyone use a fluid and wipe on this thing.?/// How about a lens brush?

I bought an electrical component vacuum and used a small rubber hose to get a close as possible to the sensor without touching it. However, my guess is that the dust is acting as a charge particle and adhering to the sensor/low pass filter.

Any ideas/advice appreciated.

Bill
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 8, 2006, 8:22 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

As long as you follow the instrutions with the cleaner, you shouldn't have any problems. Just google sensor cleaning and you'll get many options. If you are the least bit uncomfortable, either send the camera to NIkon, or maybe you have a local camera shop that could take care of the cleaning.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2006, 9:25 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
DocX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 114
Default

This might sound a little extreme and not be whats recomended but for my D50 We have a air compressor at work (I work in a photolab) and I after trying the air bulb thing that just wasnt strong enough I used the air compressor at work. No liquid ever comes out of it so i just took off the lens locked up the mirror, held the camera pointing down towards the floor and from a distance started blowing in there. Its helped a bit at first and then I got closer to blowing in it and before I knew it all the specks where gone. It blows pretty hard so I just made some quick passes with it in the chamber and that worked for me.

Best of luck, Mark
DocX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2006, 11:27 AM   #4
Administrator
 
steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 2,535
Default

DocX wrote:
Quote:
This might sound a little extreme and not be whats recomended but for my D50 We have a air compressor at work (I work in a photolab) and I after trying the air bulb thing that just wasnt strong enough I used the air compressor at work. No liquid ever comes out of it so i just took off the lens locked up the mirror, held the camera pointing down towards the floor and from a distance started blowing in there. Its helped a bit at first and then I got closer to blowing in it and before I knew it all the specks where gone. It blows pretty hard so I just made some quick passes with it in the chamber and that worked for me.

Best of luck, Mark

Yes, definitely extreme Not recommended as with that kind of air pressure you could literally blow the mirror or shutter out of the camera. And most air compressors shoot as much water as air, especially in high humidity environs. The average user should only use the air bulb, an approved sensor wipe or send it in for pro cleaning.
steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 9, 2006, 9:49 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Curmudgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: East Bay, San Francisco, CA
Posts: 889
Default

No one has answered the questions. Have any of you performed the swipe cleaning of the CCD on a Nikon D200? How did it come out? Has anyone tried it and damaged the sensor?
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 7:14 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Curmudgeon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: East Bay, San Francisco, CA
Posts: 889
Default

Guess I will try over on the Nikonians site... thanks everyone.

Bill
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 12, 2006, 1:21 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
wsandman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 318
Default

Bill,

The procedure is the same formost dSLRmodels and lke Steve said, anything other than the bulb blower cleaning process should be undertaken with great care. I'm a Canon owner who had similar problems with my 20D and 5D. The bulb blower didn't work after a while. I brought some sensor cleaning swabs along with special fuild designed especially for the swabs. I tried cleaning my 20D first. The initial results were worst than before. I had streaking dust particles all over my sensor. Later, afeter three more tries I managed to clean most of the dust particles. I didn't have the nerve to try thison my 5D. The problems was that the sensor swabs were designed for a 1.5 size sensor (some Canon sensors are 1.6). You need a very light touch for best results.

Bill
wsandman1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 26, 2006, 1:31 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 3,214
Default

When using cleansing solution with the sensor swab, avoid using too much as it would leave traces of the dried-up solution on the sensor, causing even worse result. I just use 1 drop of the solution to wet the swab when doing the swiping.

Also, to check whether the sensor is properly cleaned, I set the camera to a very small aperture and take a picture of a clean light colour wall witha flash for viewing on the computer screen. Once the depth of view is deep enough, every dirt on the sensor will come out sharp on the screen.

Have to say, effective cleaning is difficult to achieve, especially when dirt is at the edge or corners of the sensor. My experience is:Lesscleaning fluid, better effect.
wk7leung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 26, 2006, 9:07 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 143
Default

I have read a nuimber of Nikon people say they used invisible tape to pull of the specks. I have Canon that was full of stuff that wouldnt blow off and tried it and it worked quite well. I also have an air compressor but havent tried that. I have a moisture trap on mine as do most who use them for paint guns.
sasc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 26, 2006, 1:30 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 7
Default

I heard of dust being burned on to the sensor after time. Is that posible?

-Chris
D200 Owner
----------------------------------------------
All Nikon

D200_Owner is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:02 AM.