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Old Aug 10, 2006, 1:36 AM   #1
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You guy`s are probably on this already,if not check out these shots with the D80 compared to the Sony.....The high ISO shots are extremely decent on the Nikon,,,on the other hand i see why everyone on the Sony dslr forum on DP are not impressed with their new camera,,,noise is def not good in the sony shots..



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Old Aug 10, 2006, 5:18 PM   #2
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By the way if you put the URL into a Google search it will give you the option to translate the page. It seemed to translate most of the page.
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Old Aug 10, 2006, 7:28 PM   #3
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I have to say "Wow!" huge difference on high ISO. It proves yet again that just because the Sony camera has the same sensor as Nikon's it doesn't mean their camera can perform as well.

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Old Aug 10, 2006, 7:57 PM   #4
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rey wrote:
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I have to say "Wow!" huge difference on high ISO. It proves yet again that just because the Sony camera has the same sensor as Nikon's it doesn't mean their camera can perform as well.
It's the exposure.

For example, the ISO 800 photo from the Nikon D80 was taken at f/3.5 and 1/10 second.

The ISO 800 photo from the Sony was taken at f/3.5 and 1/30 second (shutter speeds 3 times as fast for the same lighting, ISO speed and aperture compared to the Nikon).

So, the higher ISO speed photo from the Sony is terribly underexposed compared to the Nikon image, and noise is going to be far worse in an underexpoxed image.

To make matters worse, the Sony is also about 1/3 stop more sensitive for a given ISO speed compared to the camera settings.

If you want to compare noise, you need to use the same exposure for the same subjects in the same conditions (and the testers didn't do that).

I'd wait on tests in controlled conditons before jumping to any conclusions. ;-)

On a plus note, that's a tribute to the Nikon's metering. The Sony would have needed a healthy +EV Setting with Exposure Compensation to expose the image the same way.

Heck, you could have used ISO 400 with the Sony and still had shutter speeds 50% faster than the Nikon was using for the same conditions and aperture at ISO 800.

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Old Aug 10, 2006, 9:27 PM   #5
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JimC wrote:
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Heck, you could have used ISO 400 with the Sony and still had shutter speeds 50% faster than the Nikon was using for the same conditions and aperture at ISO 800.
Looking at the images closer, that was the case. ;-)

The ISO 400 shot from the Sony at f/3.5 was using shutter speeds 50% faster at 1/15 second, compared to the ISO 800 shot from the Nikon at f/3.5 and 1/10 second.

Heck, the ISO 200 shot from the Sony was at 1/8 second at f/3.5 -- shutter speeds almost as fast as the ISO 800 shot from the Nikon at the same aperture. :-)

If you don't expose the images the same way, you can't compare them for things like noise.

Chances are, there is very little difference in noise between them, if you expose the images the same way, since both are using a Sony 10.2MP sensor.

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Old Aug 10, 2006, 11:56 PM   #6
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My mistake. I just got back from a trip so I'm just trying to catch up to all these D80 stuff, and forgot to check the fine details.
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Old Aug 10, 2006, 11:56 PM   #7
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I also agree with JimC

The better way is to take the RAW output from both camera (@ the same exposure) and run through the same converter (if such an animal exist) -> Chances are they are quite similar...

BTW the metering is also content dependent
-> In a different set of circumstances the Sony may come out ahead... Who know...
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Old Aug 11, 2006, 12:56 AM   #8
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NHL wrote:
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BTW the metering is also content dependent
-> In a different set of circumstances the Sony may come out ahead... Who know...
The 7D metering had a tendency to underexpose, and I've seen quite a few posts from users that typically use a +1 EV setting in most conditions.

The general consensus was that this was a pretty good approach, especially when shoooting in raw.

The 5D's matrix metering is a bit more neutral. But, it can still be a bit unpredictable if you've got any brighter highlights in a scene.

The Alpha is using a newly designed metering system, and most posts I've seen seem to imply that it does lean towards underexposure more often than not in harsher lighting to protect the highlights.

That's probably a good thing in most conditions. But, if you're shooting at higher ISO speeds, you really don't want to underexpose (unless you're doing it deliberately to simulate even higher ISO speeds and are willing to live with the noise in return for faster shutter speeds). lol

I keep my KM 5D set to Center Weighted more often than not anymore. It's the more predictable metering in more conditions.



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Old Aug 11, 2006, 2:52 PM   #9
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That's exactly my point...

Each designer put different weighting on the elements of the multi-segments metering depending on what shooting situation they want their camera to perform best, and theses circumstances vary with each photographers...

-> Chances are if every camera is exposed to the same grey card (covering the entire viewfinder) in the same light, they might all measure the same exposure! :-) :lol: :G

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Old Aug 11, 2006, 6:07 PM   #10
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As far as I can see there is no comparison betwin the two, Sony has problems with High ISO preformance no dought about it
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