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View Poll Results: Nikon 18-200: Does VR option really work?
Yes 5 71.43%
Not sure 1 14.29%
No 1 14.29%
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Old Sep 25, 2006, 10:56 AM   #1
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I just recently purchased Nikon 18-200 lenses. Somehow was attracted by the VR option built-in it and its zoom of course.

Now, 2 weeks later,seems like I cannot see that VR optionis making any difference. I tried it with on and off, normal and active,ranges from70mm to 200mm, low light and normal light. Still, I sense, that I cannot catch an image where it works as I it described it should.

Does anyone know is there a sort of test I be able torun to see the VR optionworking?
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Old Sep 25, 2006, 1:37 PM   #2
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VR is not going to make a difference in many of your images, especially if you're mostly shooting outdoors in bright light, or shooting moving/non stationary subjects. Where VR does help is in lower light situations, when shooting static objects. Vr will allow you to shoot handheld with longer shutter speeds, minimizing camera shake. Some claim down to 1/4 second shutter speeds (which I have not been able to duplicate) are possible with VR. VR will not eliminate, or even lessen blur from subject movement.

Without seeing some of your images and being able to view EXIF info, its hard to tell whether VR is malfunctioning or if it is just not necessary for the types of images you are shooting.
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Old Sep 27, 2006, 1:32 PM   #3
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I would say to just try lots of shots with the difference settings. The main thing to understand is what effect the aperture/shutter speed has. I like shooting in aperture priority best in most settings because I can choose how much of the background is in focus. The larger the aperture (the smaller the number) the shallower the depth of field will be. This is great for portraits as you can throw the background out of focus and bring the eye to the subject. When you shoot landscapes you generally want a small aperture (larger number) so more of the image is in focus. Then in things such as sports you can use shutter priority to control how much motion blur you get. This can be fast shutter speed to freeze the action or slower to show motion. Those are the main things to consider and you will learn the others as you go along. The joy of digital, especially when shooting inanimate objects, is that you can just shoot, shoot and shoot some more, till all your memory cards are full and your batteries are dead! You do not need to print every shot out, just see what effects the settings have. I went to a cemetery the other day and I shot about 200 frames in around an hour, just messing with the settings. I got a couple of shots that I will keep, but I am much more comfortable with the camera now. (Just picked up a D80 over the weekend) Then you can throw in ISO settings, White Balance and what not to the mix. No reason to be ashamed of using auto a lot though as it gives good results most of the time, without having to think to much. I use it especially when taking shots of my kids.
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Old Dec 10, 2006, 3:37 AM   #4
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Hi Rjseeney,

From your message, can one infer that if the shutter speed is high (fast), then VR doesn't really do anything! Because I also don't really see any difference between VR off and VR on.

Actually, I am going to an engagement party next week, where I consider the lighting to be somewhat low. So do you have any tips on how best to take photographs at a wedding/engagement type of environment (I am thinking of the typical lighting you may have at a hotel)?
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Old Dec 10, 2006, 3:06 PM   #5
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photino wrote:
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Hi Rjseeney,

From your message, can one infer that if the shutter speed is high (fast), then VR doesn't really do anything! Because I also don't really see any difference between VR off and VR on.

Actually, I am going to an engagement party next week, where I consider the lighting to be somewhat low. So do you have any tips on how best to take photographs at a wedding/engagement type of environment (I am thinking of the typical lighting you may have at a hotel)?
Toss the VR, get a prime f1.8 or zoom f2.8, And an external flash
Theres no way f3.5 - 5.6 are going to freeze people's faces if the lighting is anything less than optimal. You can overpower the pictures with the flash, but then you won't get decent fill lighting, Even on "slow" flash shutter speeds you will get shadowy edges after you take the picture because although you might not move, people in your shot will.

I did a wedding as a backup and only used my 50mm f1.8 and sb-600, I tried to use the 10-20mm sigma (and 18-200 outside (it was late and overcast and even on ISO 1600 I couldn't get fast enough shutter speeds).
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Old Dec 11, 2006, 1:00 AM   #6
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You guys who don't see the VR working must have really steady hands! (Good for you!)

When I set my lens to 200mm, I can see that no matter how hard I try, the image is NOT completely steady while looking at the viewfinder. I notice the "shake". Once I click half-way on the shutter button to activate VR, the viewfinder becomes much steadier!

So I do notice VR working live!

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Old Dec 11, 2006, 8:10 AM   #7
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I didn't say Vr didn't work. If given a choice, I'd rather shoot with VR than without. It's just that Vr doesn't work in all situations. The ability to see its effects live, is a big advantage of in lens situations.
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