Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 10, 2007, 12:48 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

I Did it

I clicked the bid button and I am now a digital photographer. Or I will be when the mail gets here assuming the camera is in good working order as promised. I didn't want to buy used but that was my only real option financially.

But now I need some help.

The camera is a Nikon D50

I need to get a battery (or two) and charger for it. I see some really cheap generic ones on ebay but I don't know how good they will be. Any advice here???

I have Nikon lenses from 17mm to 400mm but they are all older manual focus. I have no problem with using a hand held meter. But it seems I should have at least one lens that can take advantage of all the fancy metering functions in the camera. Any suggestions?
tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 10, 2007, 1:02 AM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Your best bet for specific advise regarding your camera model is probably to ask it in one of the Nikon DSLR specific forums.

Since you're interested in lenses, I'll go ahead and move this thread to our Nikon Lenses Forum now.

But, you may want to give a bit more information (budget, desired focal range, intended use, etc.). ;-)

Any modern Nikkor Autofocus lens should meter OK with a D50, and there are a lot of different Autofocus lenses available in Nikon mount (including lenses from third party manufacturers like Sigma, Tokina and Tamron).

Because of the smaller sensor size compared to 35mm film, you'll have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification) for a given focal length lens. Basically, to see how the angle of view would compare to the same lens on a 35mm camera, just multiply it by 1.5x. IOW, a 50mm lens on a camera with an APS-C size sensor like your D50 would give you the same angle of view that you'd have using an 75mm lens on a 35mm camera.

IOW, your lenses will appear to be longer. That's why many kit lenses start out at around 18mm now. So, I'd take that into consideration when lens shopping.

As for generic batteries, I've heard good and bad (some of the cheap ones are reportly made without the needed protection circuitry). I've used Generics before with good results. But, YMMV and you'd probably be safer sticking to either Nikon's batteries, or going with a better known Generic Brand (a brand that you'd find in Circuit City, Wolf/Ritz, B&H, Adorama, etc.)

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 10, 2007, 10:34 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

Thanks Jim

My big lens concern is compatibility. How well third party lenses work. I never had a problem with manual focus third party lenses, but today's lenses are a different bread. First I will want a general purpose zoom. Then something to give me the same angle of view that my 17mm gives me on film (Auto focus or not) Low price is always good (I'm poor what can I say) as long as it's not total junk.

I'm also curious if anyone knows if I can use my old sunpak auto 333 flash or will it fry the circuits?

tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 10, 2007, 11:58 AM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I'd give members a better idea of what you mean by "General Purpose Zoom" and a desired budget for best responses. There are a lot of lenses out there, and they are all a compromise in one area or another (size, weight, cost, image quality, focal range, brightness, AF speed, etc.)

If you don't need anything particularly bright, Nikon makes a few that are popular like the an 18-70mm, 18-55mm, 18-135mm, 18-200mm VR and more.

Here are some of their lenses:

http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=5

Note that Nikon's AF-S lenses have focus motors built into them. So, they usually focus a bit faster (and quieter) than a lens that relies on the body's focus motor. Nikon's lenses with a AF-D in their description also provide distance information to the camera body that it can use to help with flash exposure if you're using a modern Nikon flash.

Also note that Nikon's DX lenses are only designed to work on a camera with an APS-C size sensor. So, you may want to take that into consideration. These have smaller image circles to help them design a lens that's smaller and lighter for a given focal range/brightness. But, they won't work on a 35mm camera, and they would not work without vignetting if Nikon decides to release a body with a larger sensor later (and I'd expect that to happen at some point).

Check the "alphabet soup" designations on third party lenses you consider, too. Tamron's Di II and Sigma's DC lenses will only work on cameras with APS-C size sensors (unless you want a lot of vignetting). lol

Also, anytime you have a lot of range from wide to long, optical compromises tend to be made.

Some of the newer zooms with a larger range are not as bad as those types of lenses once were. For example, the Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 VR lens is a popular choice in that type of lens.

Tamron recently introduced an 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 AF lens that seems to be an improvement over their older 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3, too. But, this kind of lens is going to have some optical compromises. It would be very convenient though and initial reports seem to indicate that it's not that bad of a choice for good light use, as these types of lenses go.

But, for optimum quality, I'd stick to a higher end lens without as much focal range from wide to long. It all depends on your expectations of quality, and the convenience factor comes into the equation (size, weight, not having to change lenses as often to get the desired range, etc.).

As for third party lens compability, if you go with a relatively modern Autofocus Lens, you probably won't have any issues.

From time to time, you do see issues with some of the older Sigma models because they apparently reverse engineer the lens communications protocol and sometimes miss things that a camera manufacturer implements in newer bodies. Sometimes if that happens, Sigma can "rechip" a lens to make it work right.

But, they usually only rechip their higher end lenses (EX line). Most other third party lenses are OK, and current production Sigmas should be fine, too. If in doubt, I'd ask about a specific lens in the forums and see if anyone else is having issues with one.

If it's a walk around for outdoors, there are many choices, depending on your budget, desired size/weight, largest available aperture, etc.).

Personally, if I were buying a new lens as a GP walk around and I didn't need it for low light use, I'd probably go with something like a Nikkor 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5. That way, it would work on a 35mm camera or a DSLR with an APS-C size sensor, as well as any newer Nikon DSLR models introduced later with larger sensor.

Most people prefer something starting out a bit wider than that on a DSLR. It's all a matter of preference and the conditions you plan on using it in.. Some people like the new Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 (higher quality than most, brighter than most). Sigma also makes one similar to it (Sigma 18-55mm f/2.8

The newer Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC lens is also popular (only works on a DSLR with a smaller sensor though).

Another well liked lens is the Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 (brighter and sharper than most). But, 28mm may not be quite wide enough for many people.

You'll be into an ultra wide if you want to get the same angle of view you had with a 17mm lens on a 35mm camera (you'd need a lens with a focal length of around 11mm on your DSLR).

These are some popular ultra wides: Nikon 12-24mm f/4, Tokina 12-24mm f/4, Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6, Tamron 11-18mm f/4.5-5.6

The trigger voltage of the Sunpak 333 Auto should be OK. I've got one I use on a KM DSLR (and it's probably more sensitive to trigger voltage than your camera). Just use manual exposure on the camera, set the aperture and ISO speed to match the selected Auto range on the flash, set White Balance on the camera to match the flash if it's providing most of the light, and pick a shutter speed that lets the amount of ambient light in desired. Tweak as needed.

If you give a bit more info on what your desired focal range and budget in a walk around, some of our Nikon shooters can probably give you pros and cons of some of the available lenses.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 13, 2007, 10:58 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

Well I got a battery and a charger. I got a SD card I even have a friend thats going to loan me an AF lens long enough to make sure everything works as advertized. But I didn't hear the UPS guy knock on the door so I won't get the camera untill tomarrow afternoon errrrrr This is the worst part about buying on line. I hate waiting for my toys
tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:36 AM.