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Old Sep 6, 2003, 4:11 AM   #1
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Default AF-S vs. AF-D lenses for a D100

Hi,
First thanks for the assistance on early positings!

I have a 6006, and am looking to buy a d100.
My current lens's for the 6006 are probably AF-D's, so I know they will work with the D100.

However if I go with the "AF-S" lens.......,
will I lose my backward compatability with the 6006 (will the AF-S work on a 6006)?

Or should I just bag the traditional SLR once I go digital????

Lastly, what do I lose by staying with AF-D's vs moving up to an AF-S? How much faster do the AF-S's focus? Any other benefits that I would lose ?


Many thanks
ER
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Old Sep 6, 2003, 11:23 AM   #2
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I'm showing my ignorance here, but I though that a "D" lens was different than an "AF-S" lens. AF-S means that it has the sonic wave motor. Faster focusing and quieter.

And the D lenses do better metering (helps flash? I don't recall.)

Check out this link:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bh2.sph/...ID=F7AEDB669F0

For example, the new 70-200 VR lens is labled:
Zoom Telephoto AF VR Zoom Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8D G-AFS ED-IF Autofocus Lens (Vibration Reduction) - Black

Which makes it both a "D" and an AF-S.

If you have the money, always buy both D and AF-S. To me, the D isn't optional. Some AF lenses focus fast enough that you'll do ok. Other are slow. Know this before you get the AF version.
The reality is that fast focusing doesn't always matter (but it never hurts!)

Eric
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Old Sep 6, 2003, 9:10 PM   #3
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Default Re: AF-S vs. AF-D lenses for a D100

Quote:
Originally Posted by eriseman
I have a 6006, and am looking to buy a d100. My current lens's for the 6006 are probably AF-D's, so I know they will work with the D100. However if I go with the "AF-S" lens......., will I lose my backward compatability with the 6006 (will the AF-S work on a 6006)?
The AF and AFD Nikkors have the focusing motor in the camera body, and, as a result, are slower in focusing. The AF-S Nikkors, on the other hand, have the focusing motor (Silent-Wave linear motor) in the lenses, and are much faster and quieter. In general, virtually all AF-S Nikkors are backward compatible with older Nikon bodies, MF bodies included in terms of lens mount. There are problems, though. Some AF-S and AFD lenses do not have a focusing ring and are marked as the G lenses. If your camera cannot change aperture with a dial on the body, you will not be able to use the G lenses (because you have no way to set aperture). Moreover, you camera may not be able to use the VR (vibration reduction) feature of the new VR lenses (e.g., 24-120 and 70-200).

Quote:
Originally Posted by eriseman
Or should I just bag the traditional SLR once I go digital????
You certainly can use a SLR body for backup as I always do. :lol:

Quote:
Originally Posted by eriseman
Lastly, what do I lose by staying with AF-D's vs moving up to an AF-S? How much faster do the AF-S's focus? Any other benefits that I would lose ?
Basically, what you will have include quiet and fast focus and the use of the VR capability (depending on the camera body). The manual of AFS 70-200 VR indicates that only F5, F100, F80/N80, F75/N75, F65/N65, D1* and D100 can use VR. Moreover, you may not get AF at all on some old AF camera bodies. For example, the 70-200 and 17-35 manuals indicate that they can only use manual focus on older AF bodies; however, AF assistance is available. This usually does not have much problem for non-action shots. In fact, I frequently use my AFD and AFS lenses on my F3 and F2AS without much problem.

The AFS lenses are FAST, much faster than the AFD lenses, However, most AFS lenses are expansive and some cheaper ones are of the G type. Thus, IMO, using AFD lenses should not have much inconvenience if you do not do a lot of action shots.

CK
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Old Oct 4, 2003, 11:07 PM   #4
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a bunch of questions...

so the 70-200 is not a G lense?
what does the G stand for?
does the fuji s2 fall in the category with the D100?
will I be able to use the manual focus with a F100 and the fuji S2?
if you don't need the VR, would the 80-200 afs be a comparable replacement? (if you could find one)
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Old Oct 5, 2003, 2:04 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ultraman

so the 70-200 is not a G lense?
The AFS 70-200 is a G lens, because the lens states this way. See (a) in the following image.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ultraman

what does the G stand for?
A G lens does not have an aperture ring (see above (b)), which means one must set aperture using the dials on the camera body.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ultraman

does the fuji s2 fall in the category with the D100?
Since the S2 and D100 are based on the N80 that has the dials for changing aperture, a G lens can be used on S2 and D100 and any Nikon body that has dials for changing aperture. However, it cannot be used with those bodies that require to change aperture by turning the aperture ring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ultraman

will I be able to use the manual focus with a F100 and the fuji S2?
Yes, one can manual focus at any time by simply turning the focusing ring. No switch flipping is required.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ultraman

if you don't need the VR, would the 80-200 afs be a comparable replacement? (if you could find one)
When one switches off the VR (see above (c)), the 70-200VR is a very sharp non-VR zoom. In fact, it is sharper than the AFS 80-200 and has very pleasant bokeh. If you really believe that VR is something you don't want, the AFS 80-200 is a very good replacement. Try eBay because some who purchased the 70-200VR dumped their AFS 80-200 there. You might also consider the Sigma 70-200 F2.8 HSM. Good luck.

CK
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