Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 29, 2008, 5:38 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 70
Default

If I put a 50mm F1.8 Series E lens on my D40, what do I do with the aperture setting on the camera. I'll have to put the camera in M and set the aperture on the lens itself.

Does the camera just not care or do I need to set its aperture to something specific?

This is going to be a cheap way for me to determine if I like this lens. Maybe in the future I would go to the F1.8 AF so I only have to focus.

Thanks!
Attached Images
 
mckeand13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 29, 2008, 6:31 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
ReneB3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 193
Default

Set the aperture on the lens wide open at F1.8. Look through the camera and dial the aperture down to f22 and see if the finder gets darker. If it does then you can just set it with the aperture ring. Then try the same thing but takea picture at each setting and see if one is brighter than the other. I'm not sure if the D40 has the little tab to operate the aperture or not. It will never meter, so you will have to guess.
ReneB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2008, 6:35 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
ReneB3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 193
Default

It looks like it has the little lever to operate the apreture. So you should be able to just set it with the ring and shoot. Guessing at the exposure and a bit of trial and error and it should work.
ReneB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2008, 10:33 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 70
Default

I have to be in full manual to use this lens on the D40 from what I understand.

Does the aperture setting on the camera have no effect then or does it have to be set at a specific number?
mckeand13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2008, 6:42 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
ReneB3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 193
Default

You will have to be in manual mode. The test I outlined before was to see if your camera will operate the aperture lever in the lens. I see it has one so I assume it will work. The lever keeps the aperture blades open so it's brighter and easier to focus. Then when you take the picture the lever drops out to shut the aperture to where the ring is set. On newer lenses and ones without the ring the lens is locked at the smallest aperture and the camera sets the aperture blades to the correct value itself. But this requires an electrical connection to the camera that your lens does not have. You can get an inexpensive light meter to tell you the shutter speed and aperture for any given situation. Or you can use trial and error. Or put your regular lens on and see what the meter says, then swap back and set your camera in the manual mode for the same settings. Should work.
ReneB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2008, 9:49 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
tjsnaps's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 652
Default

The meter in your camera will be totally disabled. As suggest you could buy an inexpensive hand held meter or take reading with a different lens.

Or you could just use the good old fashioned Sunny 16 rule. Set the shutter speed to a setting that is close to the ISO setting. In other words if you are using ISO 200 set the shutter to 1/250. Now if your subject in under sunny light conditions set you lens to 16. If there are clouds open up to 11 in the shade 8. Take a test shot and look at the picture or better yet at the histogram if you've learned to read them. If the image is too dark go to a smaller number if its to bright a larger number.

This is not as hard as in may sound. I used this method for years with my film cameras with out the benefit of test shots. With experience you will learn to nail the exposure. You will also learn to count the clicks on the lens so you can change the settings without taking the camera away from your eye as your subject moves or the lighting changes.

A bigger problem will be focusing. The screens in modern camera are not designed for it. This is why I changed the screen in my D50. I have several old MF lenses and when practical I prefer using them over my AF lenses.

tjsnaps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 14, 2008, 12:16 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 70
Default

Maybe I'm missing it, but one of my questions remains unanswered.

I set the lens to a 1.8 aperture. The camera is in manual mode. Does the aperture size on the camera need to be set to anything specific to work correctly or is it irrelevant since I'm setting it on the lens?
Attached Images
 
mckeand13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 14, 2008, 4:43 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
ReneB3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 193
Default

That was my whole point in seeing if your D40 would operate the aperture blades in the lens.

If you look at the lens mount on the camera you will see a small lever on the left as you are looking at the body just inside the lens mount. That lever mates to a small lever on the lens in the corresponding position. That lever keeps the blades open on the lens until you press the shutter so it is easier and brighter to focus and compose. When you press the shutter the lever on the camera drops out and lets the blades shut to what you have set the aperture ring to be on the lens.

In a lens without the aperture ring or one locked at the smallest aperture the camera does not let the lever drop all the way, but just far enough to set the aperture to what you have it set for in the camera. That's why you lock them at the smallest stop.

Since your lens has no electrical connections you will have to setthe aperturewith the ring and meter separately. To see if it will work set the lens at f1.8 at 1/60 and take a shot. Then set it for F22 and keep the shutter speed at 1/60. If the exposure is darker then it will work like a champ. Just meter by trial and error or get an inexpensive handheld.

My D80 and D300 books both say this will work, so I assume yours will to.
ReneB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 14, 2008, 4:46 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
ReneB3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 193
Default

You don't have to set the camera aperture to anything. The lens does it all.
ReneB3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 15, 2008, 8:22 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 70
Default

Got the lens today and got it on the camera as fast as possible. Dialed it to F1.8 right away of course since that's what I bought it for.

Put the camera in manual mode and all is well. It just displays F-- for the aperture size. In auto mode it thinks there is no lens attached.

I took a bunch of pictures and through trial and error I got some decent ones. I really need to learn how to determine ISO and shutter speed for given aperture sizes. Any suggestions?

Attached are some pics. Some of them almost make me think F1.8 give a TOO LIMITED dof. I never thought that was possible.

Have a look.
Attached Images
 
mckeand13 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:11 AM.