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Old Jan 18, 2010, 10:38 AM   #21
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well i have reached back home, but not with what i went to buy.
when Wayne saw that i came to buy the 16-85 and i had already owned the 18-200, he told me no sale, you will be wasting your money.
so i left with the 17-55/2.8
a very nice piece of glass, he insisted the from the range from 17-55, one does not really need VR, just take your time and learn the limits of the lens.

Dave
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 9:09 AM   #22
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Default Tamron 17-50 2.8 vc

I got this lens for my Nikon D300. It is "The Bomb." I saw a few reviews where people were complaining about the image jumping for a moment when you zoom in or out on a subject. I didn't contact Tamron, but I have a similar situation with my Nikon 70-300mm with VR. I thought something was wrong with the lens because the image would jump when zooming. I was told that it was the VR feature that causes it, and not to worry. I turned off the VR, and no more jumping, so I guess they were right. I use a monopod or tripod for any shots much over 100mm, so the VR was not that important to me. The VC on the Tamron works well, and you can hear the motor working. It isn't noisy to the point of being a distraction. When you the lens focuses you can hear it more, and if you keep the shutter depressed part way you can hear a very slight whirring noise. So what???

More importantly, the f2.8 aperture throughout the entire focal range works very well. I took several test shots in low light, and was thrilled with the results. All images were sharp and I can leave the monopod home when using that lens. As with any wide angle lens, any vertical lines do curve a little at the edges. But I'm not an architectural photographer, so that doesn't bother me. I have been using a Tamron 18-200 lens for a couple of years (I bought it originally for a D200.) and it is a good all around lens for vacations, etc. But if you have to shoot in a low light setting with no flash, the 18-50 vc is hard to beat.
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 2:11 PM   #23
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I got this lens for my Nikon D300. It is "The Bomb." I saw a few reviews where people were complaining about the image jumping for a moment when you zoom in or out on a subject. I didn't contact Tamron, but I have a similar situation with my Nikon 70-300mm with VR. I thought something was wrong with the lens because the image would jump when zooming. I was told that it was the VR feature that causes it, and not to worry. I turned off the VR, and no more jumping, so I guess they were right. I use a monopod or tripod for any shots much over 100mm, so the VR was not that important to me. The VC on the Tamron works well, and you can hear the motor working. It isn't noisy to the point of being a distraction. When you the lens focuses you can hear it more, and if you keep the shutter depressed part way you can hear a very slight whirring noise. So what???

More importantly, the f2.8 aperture throughout the entire focal range works very well. I took several test shots in low light, and was thrilled with the results. All images were sharp and I can leave the monopod home when using that lens. As with any wide angle lens, any vertical lines do curve a little at the edges. But I'm not an architectural photographer, so that doesn't bother me. I have been using a Tamron 18-200 lens for a couple of years (I bought it originally for a D200.) and it is a good all around lens for vacations, etc. But if you have to shoot in a low light setting with no flash, the 18-50 vc is hard to beat.

i would love to learn how to use a monopod
i bought one about a year ago, and for some reason i can hand hold lower speeds than with the monopod

Dave
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 2:16 PM   #24
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I got this lens for my Nikon D300. It is "The Bomb." I saw a few reviews where people were complaining about the image jumping for a moment when you zoom in or out on a subject. I didn't contact Tamron, but I have a similar situation with my Nikon 70-300mm with VR. I thought something was wrong with the lens because the image would jump when zooming. I was told that it was the VR feature that causes it, and not to worry. I turned off the VR, and no more jumping, so I guess they were right. I use a monopod or tripod for any shots much over 100mm, so the VR was not that important to me. The VC on the Tamron works well, and you can hear the motor working. It isn't noisy to the point of being a distraction. When you the lens focuses you can hear it more, and if you keep the shutter depressed part way you can hear a very slight whirring noise. So what???

More importantly, the f2.8 aperture throughout the entire focal range works very well. I took several test shots in low light, and was thrilled with the results. All images were sharp and I can leave the monopod home when using that lens. As with any wide angle lens, any vertical lines do curve a little at the edges. But I'm not an architectural photographer, so that doesn't bother me. I have been using a Tamron 18-200 lens for a couple of years (I bought it originally for a D200.) and it is a good all around lens for vacations, etc. But if you have to shoot in a low light setting with no flash, the 18-50 vc is hard to beat.

Thanks for the nice, simple, hands on review of the Tamron 17-50 VC.
unfortunately i cound not get to try out the Tamron on my recent visit to the U.S, but at least i got to leave with the Nikon 17-55/2.8

Now i am in search of a lens to compliment that .

Dave
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 3:29 PM   #25
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Default Monopod uses

Hi Dave;
In case you were not kidding about how to use a monopod, I'll say this much: THINK TRIPOD. Your two legs become the other legs of the tripod. The trick is to balance yourself and lean ever so slightly into the monopod. I use it mostly for sporting events, but have taken some exposures during concerts etc. that were as slow as a 1/15 of a second and they were as sharp as if I had taken the shot at a much higher shutter speed. I have a Manfrotto Model 679B monopod and a Manfrotto 3021BPRO tripod. I have them both equipped with the Manfrotto quick release mechanism which allows me to unhook the camera from either in less than 1 second. There is a piece that stays attached to the bottom of the camera, but what a time saver. They aren't the lightest pieces of equipment, but the quality is obvious and unlike some less expensive tripods, these can be repaired and parts easily replaced. I have thrown out two Slik tripods that had pieces crack and could not be repaired or replaced. And that came right from Slik when I tried to get them fixed. If you don't mind lugging around a little more weight, they are definitely worth the time, effort and expense. The last thing you want to happen is to have a leg of a tripod collapse with your camera attached to it. The last straw for me was when the Slik tripod leg collapsed and it only had my Nikon SB800 flash on it. (<<Not exactly a heavy piece.) Thankfully the flash wasn't damaged.

Take care

Johnny Rotten

PS: They were calling me Johnny Rotten before John Lydon (of the Sex Pistols) ever picked up a pair of drumsticks. They called him Rotten because of his rotten teeth. They call me Johnny Rotten because I'm just ROTTEN. LOL
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Old Feb 21, 2010, 5:06 AM   #26
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The Nikon 18-200 is one of the best superzoom lenses available, and deserves kudos for the maximum aperture of f/5.6 instead of f/6.3 like most of its competitors. But it's still a superzoom lens, which makes it convenient, but not a good as multiple lenses of less ambitious zoom ranges.
the best superzoom is the canon 28-300 !!?
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Old Feb 21, 2010, 5:46 AM   #27
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the best superzoom is the canon 28-300 !!?
"Best Superzoom" is a lot like "Best Station Wagon" or "Best Minivan".
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Old Feb 21, 2010, 8:05 AM   #28
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Default The camera is the tool.

The camera is just a tool, and it is a poor craftsman that blames shoddy work on his tools. When photography is viewed as an art, then you become a student of light, depth of field, framing and viewing angles. I have seen some fabulous photos taken with a pocket "point N shoot" camera, and I have had some awful results using a professional camera. I was a Canon fan for over 25 years. My first was the Canon ftb and I had a 50mm f1.4 lens on it. With practice I got some amazing photos. I graduated to an AE1 and finally a T90 before going digital. What swayed me over to Nikon, was the D200 and now a D300. All the controls are on the outside of the camera and with practice, you can make adjustments without ever taking the camera away from your eye. That was my only complaint with the Canon EOS. Everything gets adjusted from a menu. I'm into sports photography, and you will no doubt lose some photo opportunities if you have to constantly scroll through a menu to make a change.

The only "BEST" of anything, is what is best and works well for you. I'm not a salesman for Tamron, but I have found their lenses to be comparable to the Nikkor line, but at a fraction of the cost. I'm not a cheapskate and don't look to take the least expensive route when buying equipment. But when I compared my 18-200mm Tamron with the same focal length Nikon lens, there were only two differences. The Nikon had Vibration Reduction, and it cost twice as much. Is it a better lens? Maybe. But is it twice as good? I think not. Plus anytime I shoot at over 100mm, I use a monopod or a tripod, so the VR feature was not that important to me.
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Old Feb 21, 2010, 8:19 AM   #29
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the best superzoom is the canon 28-300 !!?
Except it won't fit on a Nikon body, and is not nearly wide enough for general use on a non full frame DSLR. The Nikon 18-200 is the best superzoom option on a nikon DSLR
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Old Feb 21, 2010, 7:49 PM   #30
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I wasn't talking about attempting to put a Tamron lens made for Canon onto a Nikon. My statement was that the Tamron (made for Nikon) in 18-200mm is just about as good as the nikon lens, but at 1/2 the cost. Since I switched to Nikon, I got rid of all my Canon lenses. But I do have a Tamron AF 18-50mm f2.8 VC (for Nikon) a Tamron AF 18-200mm f3.5-6.3 XR DiII (for Nikon) <<this is a great all around lens but you need a monopod or tripod once you get out past 100mm or so. I also have a Tamron 200-500mm f5-6.3 Di (for Nikon) <<I have never even attempted a shot hand held with this one.....too big and heavy. I also have a Tamron SP AF70-200mm f2.8 (for Nikon) <<I have gotten some amazing indoor low light shots at my daughter's marching band concerts. I know I have a lot of duplication, but the 18-200 is a good lens for sporting events, the 70-200 f2.8 is awesome for marching band competitions which are almost always outdoors and at night, under artificial lighting. I bought the 18-50 f 2.8 for indoor concerts. I do have a Nikon 70-300mm that I use for my daughter's lacrosse games, but am considering trading it in for the new Tamron 18-270mm VC. Actually, I may dump the 18-200mm Tamron & the Nikon 70-300mm if the 18-270 measures up.
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