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Old Nov 28, 2010, 11:52 PM   #21
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Thanks for all your advice I really appreciate it I wanna get better in this field in general and with all the advice im getting on here and plus the practice I've been doing is really helping thanks
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Old Nov 28, 2010, 11:54 PM   #22
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Thanks for all your advice I really appreciate it I wanna get better in this field in general and with all the advice im getting on here and plus the practice I've been doing is really helping thanksim gonna stick with the lenses I have now and im gonna pick up the sb600 and work with flash more
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Old Nov 28, 2010, 11:57 PM   #23
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Thanks for the advice im just gonna stick with the lenses I have now and pick up the sb600 and play with flash more I really apreciate all the help cause I wanna get better in photography and the help I get on this site plus practice is really helping me to get better and understand things more
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 8:36 AM   #24
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I have to disagree with RJ here. I don't think you can evaluate how an f/4-5.6 lens is limiting you with indoor shooting without having experience with a bright lens. The f/1.8 35mm lens really does give you a direct appreciation of what fast glass can do for you. Maybe other people can reason that out from a theoretical examination of EV, but I really needed to have my hands on the lens to recognize what it meant to my shooting possibilities. As always, YMMV.
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 10:51 AM   #25
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I have to disagree with RJ here. I don't think you can evaluate how an f/4-5.6 lens is limiting you with indoor shooting without having experience with a bright lens. The f/1.8 35mm lens really does give you a direct appreciation of what fast glass can do for you. Maybe other people can reason that out from a theoretical examination of EV, but I really needed to have my hands on the lens to recognize what it meant to my shooting possibilities. As always, YMMV.
You may be right to a certain extent...kind of you don't know what your missing if you've never had it. But still, you can figure out what you need using your current equipment. The op has said that he was looking for a portrait lens. But then, he stated he doesn't do much portrait work, and he was looking at the 35mm, which is not really a great portrait lens. He was trying to solve a problem he really didn't have with a lens that wouldn't solve the problem even if he had it. You can find out pretty quickly if your current equipment is holding you back. Fast glass is great...I'm not against using it (all my zooms are f2.8), but you have to have the right lens for the right task. Getting a fast lens that won't solve your problem doesn't do anything but drain your wallet. Now you could always rent or borrow lenses to try them out before making the plunge to lessen the risk. But I'm not a big fan of just spending $'s to find out if I need something.
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 12:30 PM   #26
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Ok what would be the reasons to own a 35mm like uses and things like that I understand its a fast lens but what type photography woe u use it for
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 1:01 PM   #27
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Ok what would be the reasons to own a 35mm like uses and things like that I understand its a fast lens but what type photography woe u use it for
as you mentioned earlier, 35mm behaves like a 50mm on full frame and it's FOV is close to what the human eye sees. It's a good focal length for environmental portraits where you are not isolating your subject but want the context of the background as well. It also gives you more room to work indoors where you can't back up as much. If you're interested in this focal length you might want to contact peripatetic - he uses 50mm on full frame camera quite a bit. He can show you some great examples of what the focal length and wide aperture can be used for.
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 1:27 PM   #28
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Yea im thinking he same way u r on things and it could be a short walkaround lens just to have in my bag for low light situations and things like that or at places that flash isn't allowed
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 1:51 PM   #29
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zombz, I just realized that you began the thread on getting into photography for a living. So I probably don't have much insight that would be particularly useful to you -- I'm a snapshot kind of guy and that fits both my talents and aspirations wrt photography. But I really found the 35mm f/1.8 addictive. There are some lenses that just seem "natural," and this is one like that for me. The lens is a light sponge, which makes it thrilling to shoot with -- I really got the feeling that I could shoot anything with that lens. And it gets in your head very easily -- it is how I "see" anyway, so I don't need to visualize why I'm putting the lens on the camera. With other lenses, I may choose to put them on the camera for particular shots or excursions, but when I do so it is because I have particular expectations about the shooting environment. With the 35mm, it is just because I may want to take a photo.

I am not all that fond of standard-length zooms. I like my Tokina 12-24, but that is because I find UWA lenses hard to use and unforgiving. The zoom first and foremost lets me get away from the widest end without having to change lenses. With my Nikkor 55-200, again it allows me to get away from the telephoto end if I just want to take a picture without having to change lenses. But in the 35mm range, there's nothing I want to get away from -- it's home! ISTM that, for the most part, standard zooms are just icons of sloth. I am much more thoughtful when I compose with my feet than when I turn a zoom ring and declare it composition. There's really not a lot of perspective difference in a typical kit lens -- it's just convenience. For me, convenience is often what I substitute for thought. If you have aspirations to professionalism, that sort of thing may simply not apply to you.
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 2:05 PM   #30
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Yea I understand what u r saying my other tread was to get a understanding how pros got where they r in the field im looking at jjust getting a lens to just add to my bag for the times I find low light and Indoor types of portraits and that auto focuses on my camera that I can carry around that's light weight and things like that
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