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Old Mar 10, 2011, 9:53 AM   #11
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Thanks for your help! I will try this at the next hockey game. One more question, you recommend Aperture priority over manual for hockey games?
Yes. I almost never shoot in full manual (in fact I can't remember the last time i did). First it's easier to manage just one setting than all three (iso, aperture and shutter speed). Just shoot wide open, and then you only have to adjust ISO to get the shutter speeds you want. Second, since you're shooting moving subjects, you just don't have the time to be constantly adjusting settings, and the D5000's control interface does not allow quick setting changes as many settings have to be changed from the menu. I would mostly use manual for static subjects in difficult lighting where you have the time to make changes and where the camera may have difficulty choosing the correct setting, or where you are looking for a specific effect.
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Old Mar 10, 2011, 10:41 AM   #12
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And there is where rjseeney and I will disagree. If the light levels are constant (and they usually are) the things causing the camera to meter differently (uniform colors, background objects, amount of ice in the frame) aren't things you really want to change settings for. Which is why, for basketball, volleyball, wrestling, swimming - all indoors I shoot manual.

You're always going to find some differences of opinion. Try both methods and see which gives you results you desire.
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Old Mar 10, 2011, 11:10 AM   #13
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Thanks for the help, I'll give it a try and see how it goes the next couple of weeks.
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Old Mar 10, 2011, 11:53 AM   #14
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And there is where rjseeney and I will disagree. If the light levels are constant (and they usually are) the things causing the camera to meter differently (uniform colors, background objects, amount of ice in the frame) aren't things you really want to change settings for. Which is why, for basketball, volleyball, wrestling, swimming - all indoors I shoot manual.
I know kimgbalan has a D5000 but...

If you have a D90 and above you use something called the EV Method (or EV Mode, though itís not really a mode yet.) Itís basically an extended version of AE Lock. On your Nikon, set your AE-L to AE Lock (Hold), and set your meter Auto-Meter off Delay to 30 minutes. Thatís all you need to do.

To use the EV Method just meter a middle tone, such as the grass in the field, and lock exposure. The mode doesnít matter...could even be manual mode. Once exposure is locked with the AE-L button, the camera will keep the set exposure no matter what you do (short of turning it off or switching to the P&S modes on a D7000/D90.) You can change between shooting modes and change ISO and the camera will keep the set exposure.

The EV Method allows you to quickly adjust a parameter using an auto mode, while maintaining a fixed exposure level. So you can be in shutter priority, for example, and catch a rusher breaking through the line of scrimmage with a high shutter speed. But if he breaks pass the blockers you can instantly spin your command dial for a slow shutter and take some creative blur shots while panning. Your exposure is perfect because itís locked, but youíve also got the freedom you get from auto modes to adjust shooting parameters without having to maintain correct exposure.

At the moment there are three limitations with this method. First, I donít think it works with Canon, which, I believe, makes you press the AEL button after every shot to keep the lock. Dunno about Pentax or Oly. Second, the meter timeout is a pain, although with a timeout of 30 minutes youíd need to basically leave the camera untouched for a 1/2 hr. before you lose your lock. Then you need to point the camera at the grass on the field and press AE-L again. Horrible. Third, it would be nice to set exposure via an EV level. Say, for Sunny 16 you set just set an EV of 14.5 and youíre done. This has all been suggested to Nikon...hopefully theyíll add some feature in the future to make the EV Method easier to use.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 11:58 AM   #15
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RJseeney I tried your settings as suggested and the hockey pictures turned our great last weekend! Thanks for your help. Our family is travelling to the Grand Canyon next week - what do you suggest for settings for taking some great pictures there?
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Old Mar 20, 2011, 8:08 AM   #16
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RJseeney I tried your settings as suggested and the hockey pictures turned our great last weekend! Thanks for your help. Our family is travelling to the Grand Canyon next week - what do you suggest for settings for taking some great pictures there?
The Grand Canyon is great. I know this may not be possible, but try not to shoot during mid day...early in the morning, late in the afternoon is the best time to shoot. Use a wider angle lens, stop down a little (around f8 or so) to maximize depth of field. You may want to punch your color up in your settings, or shoot in landscape mode too, to make things easier. Adding a polarizing filter will help too.

When shooting landscapes, look for depth...elements in the foreground, and background help balance pictures and make things more interesting.
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Old Mar 20, 2011, 11:42 AM   #17
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Use a wider angle lens... Adding a polarizing filter will help too.
While the basic set of suggestions sounds good to me, these two suggestions are at odds with each other. The usual rule of thumb is to not use a CPL with a lens wider than about 35mm. FWIW
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Old Mar 20, 2011, 12:32 PM   #18
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While the basic set of suggestions sounds good to me, these two suggestions are at odds with each other. The usual rule of thumb is to not use a CPL with a lens wider than about 35mm. FWIW
If your using a standard kit type lens (that starts around 18mm,sa) you'll be fine. You may get some vignetting, but if you zoom out just a little it will be manageable. Your other option, is to stitch several shots together. However, depending on where you go, there may be crowds that will get in the way of these shots.
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Old Mar 20, 2011, 7:12 PM   #19
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It isn't the vignetting so much as that awful polarizing artifact from covering too wide an angle across the sky. Personally, I don't tend to use CPLs at all on landscapes for that reason, but if I do, I try to limit their use to tele shots. But then, I really find the polarizing artifacts in the sky visually repulsive.
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