Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 21, 2011, 10:39 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 688
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fldspringer View Post
Its full height, but cropped to 5:4 and was shot with the TC-14 for a bit more magnufication. It was handheld, as is usual for my macro stuff.

Greg
105 starting to look like a winner, if the bee shot is on a d3 with 1.4 converter, my d300 field of view will be the same, maybe not as clean.
Why some say to switch off vr when shooting macro even if handheld, I thought thats why nikon put it there
dafiryde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 22, 2011, 1:51 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Wizzard0003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Aberdeen, WA USA
Posts: 1,085
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tclune View Post
Wouldn't the max aperture vary with the focal distance on the macro lens in macro mode?
Yes, the closer you get to the subject the smaller the available max aperture...
Nikon micro lenses will report this to the camera and it will be included in the
exif I believe... At least that's how it works with my 85mm f/3.5G...
__________________
William

D7k with old/new glass and a few other things...
Wizzard0003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 22, 2011, 6:20 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

Thanks.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3, 2011, 1:51 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 49
Default

Much of a good macro photo is composition and lighting. I have the Micro-Nikkor in the 60mm, 105mm, and 200mm focal lengths. An indoor test shooting dead insects with my D700 on a tripod, with a cable release and 3 flashes, had the best results with the 105, followed by the 200 and then the 60.

Outdoors for handheld shots, 105 and 200 are very good, it depends on how much working distance you want.
Tallgrass05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2011, 12:18 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 688
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallgrass05 View Post
Much of a good macro photo is composition and lighting. I have the Micro-Nikkor in the 60mm, 105mm, and 200mm focal lengths. An indoor test shooting dead insects with my D700 on a tripod, with a cable release and 3 flashes, had the best results with the 105, followed by the 200 and then the 60.

Outdoors for handheld shots, 105 and 200 are very good, it depends on how much working distance you want.
Thanks for that sumary,
Dont own a tripod and dont intend on gettig one , so mypics will be hand held and would need some working distance as my macro shots is gonna be live insects

Dave
Nikontrini
dafiryde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2011, 7:53 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

A longer focal length gives you a greater working distance for the same magnification. If you're shooting handheld, mage stabilization will help with 1:2 or 1:3 magnification, but for 1:1 it won't be much use. If you don't want to get a tripod, you might consider a macro flash or ring light.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2011, 8:06 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default Focal Length, working distance for Macro...

There is alot said that long focal lengths are good for skittish insects, and that can be true. There is another side of the coin though.

The short focal length lenses allow moving the parts of the subject that are in focus by a meer twist of the camera. The longer lenses require you to back away and work your way back in at a different angle. Just about time you think you got it, the bug will move and the process has to start all over again.

Bug's eyes are very sensitive to motion across their microlenses. They are less sensitive to slower motion directly toward them. Its often easier to take a series of pics, 1/4 life size, 1/2 life size, 3/4's, then 1 to 1. Its sometimes astounding how easy it is to get close.

The big issue with the short focal lengths at maximum magnifications is getting the light to the subject. The lens is so close to the subject that it tends to block ambient light, and the lens will cast a shadow on things if on camera flash units are used. A dedicated flash will be necessary, or the use of reflectors.

Greg
__________________
Greg

https://dogsportphoto.smugmug.com/
fldspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 12, 2011, 7:00 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
shutterbug1076's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 144
Default

I'm amazed that no one has suggested the Tamron 90mm 2.8 macro...I love mine! Super sharp and easy to use. Just slide the nice wide focus ring forward or backward to switch from auto to manual focus. The working distance is about 8" from the end of the lens. When I want to get really close I use my 6t and 5t. Both of them stacked let's me get down to 4-5"...if you search my posts you'll find some examples.
shutterbug1076 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:50 AM.