Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 31, 2012, 10:01 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
banksy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 2,144
Default 50mm or 60mm macro lens for D7000

Hi everyone,

Hoping you can help with my choice.
I currently have a Nikkor 105mm macro lens which is awesome for shooting bugs.
I also enjoy still life photography and find that I need to move the camera (+ 105mm lens) too far away from the subject in order to get all the subject in the frame, causing a loss of the fine detail.
I have a Nikkor 50mm f1.4G prime lens which is my favourite lens and tack sharp but also requires a good distance from the subject.
Am I crazy for considering a 50mm or 60mm macro lens? If not, which of the two would be better for still life photography?

Thanks
Lyn
__________________
Panasonic FZ35 | Nikon D7000

http://www.flickr.com/photos/banksyinoz/
banksy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 31, 2012, 10:37 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Bob Nichol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern Ontario Canada
Posts: 822
Default

You should get the same level of detail for the same image size no matter the focal length of the macro. The only difference the 50 or 60mm macro has will be the working distance to the subject which will be closer. This may cause problems with the camera or lens casting unwanted shadows or spooking bugs or other small creatures.

Your 50mm f/1.4 is not a macro so is not in the same league.
Bob Nichol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 31, 2012, 10:54 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
banksy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 2,144
Default

Thanks Bob, the working distance is the thing which has prompted my question.
__________________
Panasonic FZ35 | Nikon D7000

http://www.flickr.com/photos/banksyinoz/
banksy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2012, 1:35 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Wizzard0003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Aberdeen, WA USA
Posts: 1,085
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by banksy View Post
Thanks Bob, the working distance is the thing which has prompted my question.
At the minimum working distance, whatever that may be, the magnification
will be the same regardless of the macro as long as the reproduction ratio
is the same... 1:1 is 1:1 whether it's 50mm or 300mm...

If you want more magnification try a teleconverter... My Kenko 1.4x TC works
excellent with my macro... Cropping is another option for greater magnification
but you may loose some IQ depending on how extreme you crop...

Regardless though, the same image size is the same image size... If your subject
fills the frame from 2 feet away or fills the frame from 20 feet away the detail will
be the same, assuming of course both lenses are of the same caliber regarding
sharpness...

Hope that helps somehow...
__________________
William

D7k with old/new glass and a few other things...

Last edited by Wizzard0003; Aug 1, 2012 at 1:44 PM.
Wizzard0003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2012, 3:15 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by banksy View Post
Hi everyone,

Hoping you can help with my choice.
I currently have a Nikkor 105mm macro lens which is awesome for shooting bugs.
I also enjoy still life photography and find that I need to move the camera (+ 105mm lens) too far away from the subject in order to get all the subject in the frame, causing a loss of the fine detail.
I have a Nikkor 50mm f1.4G prime lens which is my favourite lens and tack sharp but also requires a good distance from the subject.
Am I crazy for considering a 50mm or 60mm macro lens? If not, which of the two would be better for still life photography?

Thanks
Lyn

Hi,
Rather than thinking about getting another macro lens, you can try using an extension tube with your existing 50mm 1.4G. Since there is no glass in the tube, there is no degradation to image quality and sharpness.

Kenko offers a 3 extension tube kit that is fairly easily available. I believe the 3 are 12mm 20mm and 36mm. the one caveat is that you lose infinity focus with them.

Zig
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2012, 6:42 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
banksy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 2,144
Default

Thank you Bob, William and Zig. All good advice which I will take onboard.
I have considered extension tubes before, just not done much research on them.
Leaning towards the 60mm macro lens as it is lighter than the 105mm (also it seems Nikon may not be making the 50mm any longer).
Your comments are appreciated, as always.
Lyn
__________________
Panasonic FZ35 | Nikon D7000

http://www.flickr.com/photos/banksyinoz/
banksy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2012, 3:22 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Wizzard0003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Aberdeen, WA USA
Posts: 1,085
Default

One other thing to keep in mind: The closer to the subject the shallower the DOF...
This means that you may even get slightly less detail with a shorter working distance
because you will be closer to the subject...

Tip: Macro photography sort of works the opposite from portrait photography... With
portrait photography you are usually opening a lens up to lessen the DOF and get
subject isolation... With macro photagraphy you are usually close to the subject so
DOF can become razor thin... This means stopping the lens down quite a bit to gain
DOF so that more of your subject is in focus... For macro I usually start at f11-f16
and will go to f20 (or even more) to bring more of my subject into focus...

Just for fun try stopping your 105mm down quite a bit and see if you get the "More
Detail" you are looking for...
__________________
William

D7k with old/new glass and a few other things...
Wizzard0003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2012, 6:04 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

Wizzard raises a very good point.

You can also try using focus stacking as a technique, then using a focus stacking software such as Helicon Focus, which I personally use. The process is to take a series of images of the subject with the focus in each image set to a different segment of the subject. You then take these images and import them into Helicon and the software analyzes/blends all the "sharp in focus" segments into one stunning image.

Whats required is a tripod.
Very impressive results.

Zig
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2012, 6:12 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Wizzard0003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Aberdeen, WA USA
Posts: 1,085
Default

Another good alternative, Zig...!
__________________
William

D7k with old/new glass and a few other things...
Wizzard0003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2012, 6:35 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

By the way, Banksy, I took a look at your photos on Flicker. Very impressive.

I enjoyed looking at how you controlled color and lighting in your images.
Very, very good indeed.
Zig
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:28 PM.