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Old Aug 31, 2012, 9:54 AM   #1
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Default Polarized lens

Is there much of a differance in the differant brands of polarized lens, what about the "off" brands on e-bay. I would like to have one for each of my lenses, about 10 in total.

I am using a Nikon D70.

Thank You,

Eric
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Old Aug 31, 2012, 1:35 PM   #2
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Any filter adds an optical element to a lens, and the quality of that element can have a substantial effect on image quality.


See:Polarizing filters are only affective outdoors in bright sunlight. If you don't use all your lenses outdoors, you can skip some. Another thing to consider is that Polarizing Filters lose 1-2 stops of light, so you'll need slower shutter speeds, larger apertures and/or higher ISOs to get the same shots you're getting now without them.
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Old Aug 31, 2012, 4:30 PM   #3
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G'day Eric

TC is pretty right here -
also .... in my photo workshops I come across too many people with "$10-specials off ebay" where they are fuzzy [glass poor quality] &/or hardly any noticable pola effect at all in the image

I suggest you only buy 'good' branded filters where you can be sure of good IQ from each pic you take

Regards, Phil
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Old Sep 4, 2012, 8:29 AM   #4
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Most people have told me that B+H MRC are the best with Marumi next, how close are the Marumi's to the B+H considering it looks like they are about twice as much? Are there any others to even consider (i.e. Tiffen, Kenko, ect.)?

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Old Sep 4, 2012, 8:46 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by er5reni View Post
Most people have told me that B+H MRC are the best with Marumi next ...
Not so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by er5reni View Post
how close are the Marumi's to the B+H considering it looks like they are about twice as much? Are there any others to even consider (i.e. Tiffen, Kenko, ect.)?
The best indicator of a filter's quality is its price. (You may pay a slight premium for OEM filters, but they're still better than most third party filters.) Expensive filters are very good in most situations; cheap filters are just good in only a few.

You should only get multicoated filters.
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Old Sep 4, 2012, 8:52 AM   #6
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BTW, everything you read about the importance of quality filters goes double for Polarizing filters, because Polarizing filters are, in fact, two filters in one. The kinds of things that make a bad filter bad will make a Polarizing filter twice as bad.
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Old Sep 4, 2012, 8:56 AM   #7
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Polarizing filters are only affective outdoors in bright sunlight.
Not so. It is not uncommon to use polarizers in a studio where glare from the studio lights may be an issue -- commonly with a polarizer on the light source and another on the lens, to be able to fine-tune the lighting. Second, any highly-reflective surface may be a candidate for polarizer use, whether the sun is particularly bright or not. Store display windows and smooth lake surfaces may benefit from using a polarizer, even on less than bright days.
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Old Sep 4, 2012, 9:03 AM   #8
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Quote:
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Most people have told me that B+H MRC are the best with Marumi next, how close are the Marumi's to the B+H considering it looks like they are about twice as much?
My polarizing filters are Marumi. Top-of-the-line B+H have a somewhat better coating for lessening glare, but not enough to worry about unless you are firmly committed to getting the best at any price. Marumi polarizers are excellent filters with decent glare resistance at a very attractive price-point. FWIW
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Old Sep 4, 2012, 11:47 AM   #9
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Not so. It is not uncommon to use polarizers in a studio where glare from the studio lights may be an issue ...
Polarizing Filters are only effective against unpolarized light. That is, light that has passed through a lot of the earth's atmosphere. Light that comes from artificial light sources doesn't pass through much air, and is reflected off the reflectors behind the source, so by its nature, is already polarized to a great extent. Thus, a Polarizing Filter will have no affect on it beyond its light loss under conventional circumstances, much like a Neutral Density Filter would.
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Last edited by TCav; Sep 4, 2012 at 12:00 PM. Reason: sp
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Old Sep 4, 2012, 12:43 PM   #10
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TCav, tell it to the pros.
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