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Old Dec 11, 2012, 9:00 AM   #1
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Default Help - My Lenses

Hello everyone,

By this post, it will become pretty obvious that I am very much a amateur wannabie.

In 1993, I bought a Nikon 6006 camera and a few lenses I have accumulated between 1993 and 1998. At that time, I wanted to shoot photos and did not learn much about photography equipment. So I believe now that I might have invested in high end lenses for a low end camera.

The lenses I bought (which I still have them) are:

Nikkor 35-80mm F4-F5.6 D AF Macro Zoom Bayonet Mount
Nikkor 24mm F2.8 AF Bayonet Mount
Nikkor 28-85mm F3.5-F4.5 AF Macro Zoom
Nikkor 80-200mm F2.8 ED AF

The distance information for first two lenses (in the product literature) is listed for Nikon F90-Series and N90* Cameras.

Fast forward to 2012/2013, I want get back into SLR photography. Fortunately, in the digital photo age there is no wasting of money with film development.
I am interested in buying a Full-Frame camera and I want save some money with the lenses. Will the above listed lenses work on a Nikon D800?

Thank you in advance for any advice and information.
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Old Dec 11, 2012, 4:06 PM   #2
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Yes, all of those lenses will work with the higher end models that have the
in-body focus motor like the D800 has...

Here's a nice little Nikon lens compatability chart that may come in handy for
beginers...

http://www.nikonians.org/nikon/slr-lens.html

Even the older AI and AIS manual focus lenses will work...

The only lenses that won't work with modern Nikon DSLR's are early "non" or
"pre" AI lenses unless they have been converted to AI... Lenses converted to
AI are refered to as "AI'd" lenses... Attempting to mount an unconverted non/pre
AI lens can actually damage the camera...

Hope that's helpful...
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Last edited by Wizzard0003; Dec 11, 2012 at 4:25 PM.
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Old Dec 11, 2012, 4:41 PM   #3
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There is another consideration.

Digital image sensors are much more reflective than film. Modern lenses have antireflective coatings on the rearmost lens elements, that weren't necessary or even anticipated when all there was was film. As a result, Ghosting, a type of lens flare can result, especially with large aperture lenses, and will probably occur more frequently on a 'Full Frame' camera body.

I'll add that, while those are nice lenses, they're not great lenses. I wouldn't buy a 'Full Frame' dSLR just because I had those lenses. In fact, if I had those lenses, I might specifically buy an APS-C dSLR.

You can find out for your self, btw, by renting what you think you might like to buy. LensRentals rents the 'Full Frame' D800 (36MP) and D600 (24MP), as well as the APS-C D7000 (16MP), all of which will work fine with your lenses.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 7:34 PM   #4
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The lenses you've listed are a good basic set of lenses for either a DX cropped sensor or FX full frame Nikon camera. Albeit, you have a bit of overlap with the 28-85mm & the 35-80mm lenses.

The 24mm will serve you well as a standard landscape lens on an FX body. On a Dx body (D7000), the 1.5 crop factor turns the 24mm into a 36mm lens which is not quite a good landscape lens.

The 80-200mm f2.8 is actually a great lens but lacking image stabilization (VR).
None the less, it will give you sharp images and AF should track very easily with either FX or DX.

The 35-80mm is a bit of a duplicate because of the 28-85 which would be my choice because of the slightly wider angle of view. You could sell it and get your self a 50mm f1.8G prime. or pay towards the purchase of your new camera.

If I were in your shoes, I'd consider the D600 as the body is significantly less
expensive than a D800. Aside from being a DX body, the D7000 is almost 3 yrs old and is due to be replaced.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 5:14 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
... Aside from being a DX body, the D7000 is almost 3 yrs old and is due to be replaced.
True, but it is the newest DX body that will work with those lenses. Plus, it uses that nice Sony 16MP sensor that performs very well. So even though it is due to be replaced soon, it's still an excellent choice.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 5:21 AM   #6
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Quote:
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True, but it is the newest DX body that will work with those lenses. Plus, it uses that nice Sony 16MP sensor that performs very well. So even though it is due to be replaced soon, it's still an excellent choice.
All true, TCav. And, since I own one, I enjoy it each and every day.
My point was that, if the D600 was available at the time I bought the D7000, my decision may have been different.

And to add some add'l incentive, I got an e-mail from Adorama this morning, announcing special incentive discounts by Nikon on their bundled kits. The D6000 including 24-85mm lens @ 1996.00
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 6:56 AM   #7
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This post prompted me to pull out the 28-85mm 3.5-4.5 AF Macro from the closet and take a few shots with it. Since it's about 20 degrees out right now, I thought I'd limit my photo subjects to something indoors.

Here is a quick shot taken with the 25-85 in macro mode using a D7000 mounted on a tripod. Natural light, no flash. EXIF data can be readily seen for the specific settings.

All in all, not bad for an inexpensive lens. I got mine at an estate sale for $15.



One concern needs to be pointed out, my experience with this lens is that it tends to over-expose a bit. Probably the lens coating. This image was underexposed by 1.5 stops.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 8:24 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
One concern needs to be pointed out, my experience with this lens is that it tends to over-expose a bit. Probably the lens coating. This image was underexposed by 1.5 stops.
Since metering takes place through the lens, I doubt it's the lens coating. I'd be more inclined to suspect that your diaphragm is slow to stop down. I'd try shooting at different apertures from wide open to stopped all the way down, to see how consistant the tendancy to overexpose was.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 9:07 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Since metering takes place through the lens, I doubt it's the lens coating. I'd be more inclined to suspect that your diaphragm is slow to stop down. I'd try shooting at different apertures from wide open to stopped all the way down, to see how consistant the tendancy to overexpose was.
I'll have you know my diaphragm is just fine-thank you very much

Seriously, thanks for the good advice. I will give that a try. But, to be honest, I generally will be using other lenses. This was more of an exercise to see how sharp the lens was for the benefit of the OP.

Zig
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Old Dec 19, 2012, 5:07 AM   #10
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zig-123, Thank you for your input!

What is F-Mount and Bayonet Mount relating to Lenses and camera? I am afraid that the CPU contacts on the lenses and the mounting these lenses on to new Nikon DSLR would be difficult or that they are incompatible.
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