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Old Sep 25, 2004, 8:38 AM   #1
maw
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Hello,

Nikons PN-11 extension tube for the Nikon 105mm macro lens does not allow any of the D70 auto focus (and other) features to work I'm told. Kenko has an extension set (12, 20, 36mm) for Nikons lens AF-D types. Will these Kenko tubes work with a 105mm macro and allow AF and other D70 features to work, will they work with the Nikon D70 kit 18-70mm lens and the Nikon70-200mm VR lens? I assume the image quality for the PN-11 and the Kenko will be the same because no optics are involved in the extension tubes.



Thanks in advance,



Mike


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Old Sep 26, 2004, 7:10 PM   #2
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I have been using Kenko extension tubes for about ten years, now. I have used the same set on a N70, F100, and now the D100. All lens functions are coupled through. The tubes can be used in any combination or individually. However, when you start stacking them, you have to get very close to your subject and depth-of-field disappears! Anyway I would strongly recommend these extension tubes over many of the other macro techniques described in these forum, including the reverse lens technique.

Cal Rasmussen
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Old Sep 27, 2004, 9:31 AM   #3
maw
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Thanks Cal. I just ordered them from B&H. I'm fighting the very issues you mentioned, it's a tough problem when you get very close with DOF and lighting. Had any luck with macro flashes?



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Old Sep 27, 2004, 10:31 AM   #4
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I have not used or even heard of macro flashes. If you are referring to ring lights, the ones I have investigated are not flash units but simply a circular flourescent light that mounts on the lens. The ones I looked at on B&H do not include the power supply. It must be purchased separately.

I got to looking at a circular flourescent light that I use on my workbench in the garage. It is one of those with a large magnifying lens in the middle and supported by moveable arms and mounted to the edge of the bench or desk by a clamp. I found that I could remove the lens without damaging it and that leaves an opening large enough for any of my camera lenses. The advangage of this is, 1) I can mount the light on my staging table (B&D Workmate!), 2) I can adjust the light to different positions independent of the camera/lens, and 3) The camera/lens can be repositioned independent of the light.

I haven't tried it out, yet, but hope to do so this week. You can get one of these lights at any office supply or home improvement store for under $30. You'll pay three times that for a ring-light.

Note--Make sure the White Balance is set for flourescent lights or your pictures will come out with a strong green tint!

Look for some test shots in the close-up forum in a day or two.

Cal
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Old Sep 27, 2004, 12:02 PM   #5
maw
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Cal,



Thanks. I have one of the circular florescent fixtures at work...good idea. I think some of the ring devices are actually flashes. Sigma has just intorduced a new ringflash called the EM140-DG that claims to use the latest i-TTL capability of the Nikon D70. It's expensive ($350) but may be the best thing for something I've been trying. Taking close up high magnifications of integrated circuits (chips), these are a bear for me at least with the high reflectivity & DOF issues.



Regards,



Mike
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Old Oct 3, 2004, 10:28 AM   #6
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Hi Cal,

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I did a lot of closeup photography if Integrated Circuit Boards, and I found the best technique was to use no lighting whatsoever.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I set my camera up on a tripod, directly above the board so as to keep the circuit in the focal plane. Then I blocked out any direct lights (ie ceiling lamps) with matte board so as to cast shadows on the board, allowing only diffuse light to fall on it.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I then took long exposure shots (as much as 4 to 8 seconds) to get enough light, with the result being very unifromly illuminated boards with virtually no glare. The colors in the raw shots dont look as nice as if they were lit directly, but putting them through photoshop and adjusting your levels gives excellent results.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Best of luck!

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"-Mike
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