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Old Dec 22, 2004, 3:36 PM   #1
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I am looking into buying two Nikon DX lenses, but I am unsure about something. The Nikon brochure says that unlike other lenses, the angle does not change. Does this mean that a 18- 70 DX lens works as a 18-70mm lens, or do I still need to apply the 1.5 multiplier so it becomes a 35-105mm lens? This is the case with all other Nikon lenses.

So, to summarize, the Nikon 18-70 DX is equal to a 18-70 35mm lens or to a 35-105mm?

Can someone please help me out.
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Old Dec 22, 2004, 4:08 PM   #2
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dieseljunkie wrote:
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I am looking into buying two Nikon DX lenses, but I am unsure about something. The Nikon brochure says that unlike other lenses, the angle does not change. Does this mean that a 18- 70 DX lens works as a 18-70mm lens, or do I still need to apply the 1.5 multiplier so it becomes a 35-105mm lens? This is the case with all other Nikon lenses.

So, to summarize, the Nikon 18-70 DX is equal to a 18-70 35mm lens or to a 35-105mm?

Can someone please help me out.
The actual focal length of the lens is always marked. If you use this lens on a DSLR model, then you'll have a crop factor (a.k.a., focal length multiplier)for determining 35mm equivalent focal lengths (from an angle of view perspective).

This factor is 1.5x on Nikon models like the D70 and D100. So, an 18-70mm lens would have a 35mm equivalent focal range of 27-105mm on these models.

BTW, we have forums dedicated to both Nikon Digital SLR Models and Nikon Lenses. I'll move this post down to the Nikon Lenses Forum for you now.


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Old Dec 22, 2004, 4:16 PM   #3
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Ok. I knew that for other lenses but got the idea that DX lenses where made specially for Digital Cameras and thus the focal lenghts that are communicated were already transformed with the D70's crop factor in mind.
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Old Dec 23, 2004, 2:00 AM   #4
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I rather concur here. After aeons with SLR's and film, suddenly we are faced with moved goalposts, but the goalposts still speak the old language as it were. "Grain" has become for some reason "noise", we have a "crop factor" which varies depending on the manufacturer, yet still the lenses are marked using the old silver halide references. I suppose it is a factor of being older that it becomes more difficult to absorb all the new things, but it would, at least to me, seem logical to leave film lenses with the old references and the D series correctly marked for digital purposes. They are after all called the D series lenses. Incidentally, for years as an everyday lens I have carried the 24/120 and found it extremely useful in most situations. Nikon have brought out a newer version, but shouldn't they really have brought out a 16/80 instead of 18/70? Then we would have the same facilities in digital as well as silver halide. Just a thought. Happy Xmas and a prosperous New Year to all.
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Old Dec 23, 2004, 6:58 AM   #5
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cameranserai wrote:
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I rather concur here. After aeons with SLR's and film, suddenly we are faced with moved goalposts, but the goalposts still speak the old language as it were. "Grain" has become for some reason "noise", we have a "crop factor" which varies depending on the manufacturer, yet still the lenses are marked using the old silver halide references.I suppose it is a factor of being older that it becomes more difficult to absorb all the new things, but it would, at least to me, seem logical to leave film lenses with the old references and the D series correctly marked for digital purposes.
They are correctly marked. They are marked with the actual focal length of the lens.

You'll see the same thing on non-DSLR models, too (the actual focal length of the lens is marked on them, even thoughthey're much shorter than the 35mm equivalent focal length). For example, if you looked on the lens of a C-5060WZ like you owned, the actual focal length of the lens is marked as 5.7-22.8mm (even though it has a 35mm equivalent focal range of 27-110mm).

I think that the mainreason that you see the 35mm equivalent focal lengths of the lenses mentioned, and crop factors/focal length multiplierspublished, is so that users of 35mm cameras have a better idea of how the angle of view compares to the same focal length lens on a 35mm model.

The actual focal length of a lens is what is more important for determining things like Depth of Field.

You see the same types of differences when you go to film that's larger than 35mm, too. The actual focal lengths of the lenses are still marked on them. Yet, you'll have a widerangle of view for any given actual focal length compared to a 35mm model (versus a narrower angle of view like you'd have using the same focal length lens on a model with a smaller sensor or smaller film).

For example, a 45mm (actual focal length) lens on a 645 format camera would have a 35mm equivalent focal length of approximiately 29mm.

If 35mm models weren't so popular, there would be no reason to even mention a "35mm equivalent focal length".It's done for comparison purposes, since the actual focal lengths of the lenses are how they are marked.


What Nikon is apparently doing with their DX lenses, is publishing the correct angle of view fora given focal length, when the lens is used on a Digital SLR model.

For example, the widest angle of view for the Nikkor 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5G ID-IF AF-S DX lens is shown as 76 degrees at a focal length of 18mm (as you would expect when a lens with a focal length of 18mm is used on a DSLR model with a smaller sensor).

If you look at a non-DX lens, the angle of view shown in the specifications for a given focal length assumes it will be used on a 35mm model.For example, the Nikkor 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5DED-IF AF lens (non DX lens) shows an angle of view in it's specifications of 100 degrees at a focal lenth of 18mm (as you would expect when an 18mm lens is used on a 35mm camera).

The focal length at the widest setting for both lenses is identical. What changes is the angle of view, depending on the size of the sensor/film the lens is being used with.


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Old Dec 23, 2004, 10:57 AM   #6
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Ok. I guess I understand it now. Leaves me with one question. I am looking for a wide-angle lens for my D70. Which lens would you recommend? I want to photograph mostly nature and wildlife, as well as cities during my travels.
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Old Dec 23, 2004, 12:43 PM   #7
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The kitlens (18-70mm)is not bad, but if you want to go wider the Nikkor 12-24 is a good choice or the sigma 12-24 which had great reviews.
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Old Dec 23, 2004, 6:52 PM   #8
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I bought the camera with a 28-80mm lens F3.3 - 5.6 which I am not to satisfied about. I did pay only $700 however, so that is a big difference with the 18-70 kit.

So everything is possible. I just need some direction.
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Old Dec 23, 2004, 9:02 PM   #9
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dieseljunkie wrote:
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I bought the camera with a 28-80mm lens F3.3 - 5.6 which I am not to satisfied about. I did pay only $700 however, so that is a big difference with the 18-70 kit.

So everything is possible. I just need some direction.
$700.00 is a real bargain for a D70 -- even without a lens. Congratulations.

I'd try to determine why you're not satisified with your existing lens to help you make a decision about what lens (or lenses) you need.

Do you need a wider angle of view? Do you need more optical zoom? Do you need a brighter lens for faster shutter speeds in less than optimal lighting? Do you need something that focuses faster?Do you need above average optical quality at all focal lengths and apertures?

There are MANY lenses available for the D70, from multiple manufacturers, at a variety of price points, focal lengths, etc.

Some users may not ever need anything more than the 18-70mm kit lens. Others may need a bag full of lenses. It all depends on what you want to shoot, and in what conditions, and at what quality level (keeping lens size, weight and costin mind).


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Old Dec 24, 2004, 5:10 AM   #10
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Thanks for your response! I am planning to go to the Film Academy next year and was advised to start working with SLR cameras, both 35mm film and digital. I have always liked photography, just not at this level. My previous camera was a Sony Cybershot F-717 which I was more than satisfied about. It had a fast lens (F2) and great image quality. Although the D70 has superb image quality, the lens keeps me from shooting in darker situations and has no wide-angle. That are my two major shortcomings on the lens.

I like to visit zoo's in my freetime, as well as themeparks and besides that I like to photography my Border Collie in the forest as well as the nature. Another thing I like is travelling, I like photography old buildings.
I guess I can do that with a wide-angle and telephoto.

I am planning to buy two new lenses in the first half of 2005. One wide-angle, one telephoto. The telephoto lenses I have in mind are the nikon 70-200/2.8 g af-s vr if ed or the nikon 80-400/4.5-5.6 af d vr ed. My question about those is, how does the VR work on those lenses? For the wide-angle, I was thinking about one of the DX lenses.
However, I am eager to find out if the DX lenses outperform the normal lenses with the same focal length? The last lens , which was recommended by the employee of a photoshop, is the nikon 24-120/3.5-5.6 g af-s vr. Does anyone have experience with it? I am also open to buy a Sigma or a Tamron lens, but I don't have any experience with those.
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