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Old Apr 23, 2006, 8:48 PM   #1
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Just got a used Nikon D100 andAF-S Nikkor 24-85mm G ED lens. This lens was sold to me at a very low price so I decided to use this first for learning. I think that this lens is mainly for portrait, but I would like to have more flexibility with taking pictures. I also like to take close-ups photos and outdoor photos. I noticed when I took pictures outdoors the photos appeared to have blurred parts that were not in the center. Is this because of the limitation of the lens that it is only for specific lengths like for portrait?

For close-ups like taking pictures of a leaf's texture or a rose thorn what would be the best type of lens? What is the difference with zoom lens and macro lens? Sorry I'm a complete newbie with lenses and don't even know what the numbers in lenses and its specs mean.

I found this site who is also into photography and I got interested to what type of lens would also be best for the kind of pictures taken by this guy. The site is:

http://braincrap.deviantart.com/gallery/

Any help would be appreciated.
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Old Apr 23, 2006, 11:17 PM   #2
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I don't know much of a technical nature about lenses, but I'll offer some advice:

I think the D100 has a 1.5X magnification factor, so your lens would have a focal length of about 36-128mm with a 35mm film SLR. This is a good range for an "all-around" lens as it gives you medium wide angle to short telephoto range.

I don't think that you can say that it's mainly good for portraits, although it operates within the 70-105mm, or so, range that many portraitists like. I doubt that the blurred parts of the outdoor photos are due to any prblem with your lens. The lens should perform perfectly well at any focal length through its entire range. What you might be seeing in those pictures is a depth of field limitation caused by shooting with a large lens opening. This is normal. The depth of field (the range of focus) will vary with the size of the aperture you use and with the focal length used for the shot.

Ask yourself what kind of pictures you are most interested in taking. That will have everything to do with what kind of lenses you use.

For landscapes you need a wider angle lens than you have now. Lenses in the 24-28mm (in 35mm equivalent) range are widely used for landscapes. And if you want to take pictures of things farther away from you, you need a more powerful telephoto range than you have now.

For pictures of small objects you need a macro lens. This is just a lens that lets you focus closer than a non-macro lens could. Many zooms have a macro function but so do many prime (single focal length) lenses.

The web site you link to looks like it shows all different subjects under many conditions. I don't think that you can really tell what type of lens was used for the various examples.

Here are a few links to sites where you can get some basic information about lenses:

http://photography.about.com/od/basics/a/bplens.htm

http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam...-of-field.html

http://www.basic-digital-photography...ra-lenses.html

I'm sure you can find many others that answer questions that these sites don't!

Grant
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Old Apr 24, 2006, 8:35 AM   #3
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thanks for the reply and for the links. those are ver helpful. I got a question about what you said. You said my lens operates within the 70-105mm but my lens is 24-85mm, Why is that?
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Old Apr 24, 2006, 12:40 PM   #4
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SLR cameras were originally created for 35mm film. The physical size of the piece of film is part of the entire system and effects it various ways - including the focal length of the lenses you use with it. Most digital cameras have a sensor which is smaller than a 35mm piece of film. This means that a lens which was designed for 35mm cameras will have different characteristics when put on a DSLR which has a small sensor.

Smaller sensors make the lens seem like it has a longer focal length.

The D100 has a sensor which is 1/2 as high and 1/2 has wide as a piece of 35mm film. So it makes your lens seem like it is 50% longer.

Try reading this description:

http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glos...tiplier_01.htm
It has pictures and everything... this is something which might be better described with pictures than with text.

If that doesn't help, ask more questions!

I agree with Grant's comments about what lenses you'll want. I ended up getting at 17mm lens for landscape work because my 28mm lens was not wide enough (note that is in 35mm focal length numbers.)

Eric
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Old Apr 24, 2006, 1:06 PM   #5
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Eric,

Very helpful! thanks a lot. I will start practicing with my lens and ill see what other lens i need. Thanks again.

Rey
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Old Apr 25, 2006, 8:41 AM   #6
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Glad to help.

Using what you've got and figuring out what you need is definitely the way to go.
With the modern mail order world, once you figure out you really need a specific lens ('cause what you have doesn't do what you want) you can have it within a few days.

Just let your needs drive your choices and you'll be happy without throwing money away.

Note that part of the process of picking a lens is a question about your standards. There is more than one lens for a job, but some will be more $$ and better. But for your standards and needs, "better" might be a waste of money.

And don't ignore issues of weight and length. A lens that is so heavy you won't carry it much isn't worth buying.

Eric
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Old Apr 25, 2006, 9:03 AM   #7
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Yes, lenses are very expensive! that's why im trying to hear more suggestions from others about choosing one. It was a nice day yesterday and so I took pictures with my d100 using the 24-85mm lens. I was kind of limited to the maximum zoom of this lens and whenever I put it to the maximum.. my shots aren't that good. It looks kind of blurry and I can see some noise or grains from the image. Do I need to keep the camera more steady when zooming? I thought it would be different from a Digital SLR camera because I've had so much trouble using my point and shoot camera when zooming. Whats the best way to take good pictures when using zoom?

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Old Apr 25, 2006, 2:38 PM   #8
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reynaldo wrote:
Quote:
I was kind of limited to the maximum zoom of this lens and whenever I put it to the maximum.. my shots aren't that good.* It looks kind of blurry and I can see some noise or grains from the image.* Do I need to keep the camera more steady when zooming?* I thought it would be different from a Digital SLR camera because I've had so much trouble using my point and shoot camera when zooming.*
I assume "full" marking in lens is this: 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5
Now that isn't such slow for tele (many digicompacts have slower tele) but if you used lowest ISO/sensitivity in very shadowy place there might be some shake induced blurring... on the other hand "grains" sounds much like you used high sensitivity.
So what do you mean with this "blurry"? That just small part of photo sharp or is everything blurred?

Posting example photo with EXIF datas would help.

Or if you don't want to play with that you could use Dalifer's demo for exporting EXIF data to TXT (installation creates new choise to file's right click menu) and then copy EXIF+makernote parts from that. Program works with Nikon D100 pics, at least with those from Steve's review despite of program being "for Minolta".



Quote:
Whats the best way to take good pictures when using zoom?
You want to be absolutely sure there's no handshake induced blurring?
Tripod with self-timer or remote release.
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Old May 26, 2006, 9:12 PM   #9
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Jumping on the NooB bandwagon here .... my wife just purchased her FIRST EVER SLR camera, as she has been bitten baaaaaaaad by the photography bug and has finally given in to it. The newborn is a Nikon D-50, and the package deal she got includes a couple of stock lenses (18-55 Nikkor DX and a Tamron AF 70-300).

The style of photo that she wants to do is primarily macro --- like "right-in-your-face" closeups of flowers, insects, nasal follicles, you name it. Can I puh-lease get some guidance from the "old hands" here in what NUMBERS I need to be looking for of lenses. I see a ton of lenses all with the word "macro" on them, but when you look at the fine print, the minimum focusing distance might be 15" or more. Can you TRULY get great macro pix from that distance?

What f-numbers (as a guide or rule of thumb) should we be looking at? Generally, does a lower f-number necessarily mean better macro photo's or am I totally barking up the wrong tree? Will a lens with f/2.8 be OK for macro .... the stock 18-55 that came with the body has a minimum f-rating of 3.5, so does that necessarily dictate that we're not going to get terribly great macro pix from that lens?

Please someone point me in the direction of a website where all this stuff is explained.

Thx so much, cheers to all, LOVE THIS BOARD!

Mike and Pam
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Old May 27, 2006, 4:31 PM   #10
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A dedicated macro lens is your best bet. A true macro lens produces images that are life size or bigger. Some telephoto lenses have a macro feature, that usually gives a bit less than 1:1 (life size).

For macro shots, you really want to use a smaller aperature (larger f/stop number). Depth of field is extremely small (millimeters) at close distances, and using a large aperature (small f/stop number) makes it tough to get everything in focus.
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