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Old May 31, 2006, 3:20 AM   #1
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Just got my D50 with Tamron 18-200. Since this is my first DSLR I cannot compare it to anything else I have owned. I look at many pics online taken with the same lense and wonder what settings they used to take such great pics. For the most part I was always shooting AUTO and I have some good keepers, but yesterday I started using Shutter Priority and bumped the speed to about 1/400 and my pics were coming out crisper,except inside my house I had to use the flash or else the pic would be black. I have a couple of questions and I am hoping that someone can help me:

When in AUTO mode the cameraadjusts both the zoom and focus ring or can I manually zoom and the cam just AUTO focuses? When in MANUAL mode I adjust both zoom and focus rings? Would hate to ruin my lense If I am forcing something I should not be doing.

Are my F stops only from 3.5-6.3 for this lense? Yesterday I was on Aperture mode and when I set the Aperture higher like f11 or so I would get like a 5 sec shutter speed or at least it seemed that long. At first I thought something broke because it wouldn't take the pic and then it clicked.

I am hoping for some general settings advice so I can have this lens at optimal performance for instance what settings would you use outdoors when it sunny orovercast, indoors with moderate light, etc.....


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Old May 31, 2006, 10:45 AM   #2
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I'm a little confused about your question. You can set the lens to either manual focus or auto focus. This setting has nothing to do with the exposure settings. No setting automatically zooms, you have to do that. If the camera level is set to auto focus, you can't move the lens focus ring.

Try experimenting with the "P" mode. That set the optimal fstop and shutter speed. Then go to apeture priority or shutter speed priority. If in aperture priority, you can see what effect the metering has on the shutter speed, and vice versa. It is a great way to learn how aperture affects depth of field.

I just got this lens myself. I am very satisfied with it.
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Old May 31, 2006, 11:18 AM   #3
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Sorry for the confusion as I realize it was not worded the way I wanted it to be. I was just told at the store that if the cam was in AUTO, that I shouldn't touch the focus ring becuase it could cause damage to the lens. I just wasn't sure if that applied to the zoom when it was in AUTO mode. This morning I looked at the manual for the lens and it states that the zoom can be moved manually in either mode and its just the focus you have to be concerned with depending on the mode.

I will try P mode and see what it can do. Do you by chance have a UV filter installed on your lens and if so does it still allow you to place the lens cap on top of the filter.

Thanks for you help

Eddie
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 9:47 PM   #4
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Anyone interested in helping a newbie out?
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 10:22 PM   #5
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UV filters are useless on digital cameras. They do nothing to improve the image, as digital sensors are not very sensitive to UV light. They increase the chances of vignetting and softness. In terms of protection, use a lens hood. If you bang the UV filter hard enough to damage it, it will likely break andcause damage to your lens anyway. Small scratches on the front element rarely affect image quality. Just be careful. I used protective filters for years before realizing I had never bumped my lens on anything...if you own several lenses outfitting each lens gets expensive. Also Uv filters need to be removed before using other filters which is inconvenient.

In terms of what settings to use, well that's tough to answer. There's no magic bullet, or perfect setting as each photo experience is unique. Conditions change, your intent changes, etc....there is no one size fits all solution. I typically shoot in Aperature priority...this allow you to control DOF without exceeding the cameras capabilities. Using shutter all the time, especially at higher speeds (above 1/125) will at some point result in underexposure, and missed shots.
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 10:49 PM   #6
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Somehow the stuff I typed earlier didn't post...

If you haven't seen this yet, be sure to check it out. It explains a lot of stuff including Aperture and Shutter Priority.
http://www.canon.co.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/index.html

The aperture range you see on your lens are the best the lens support. As you've found, you can stop-down to higher F-Stops. I suggest you play around with Aperture and Shutter priority, that's the only way to really understand it. But be sure to checkout the link above. It has a lot of info and I went through it dozens of times when I was first reading about dSLR.

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Old Jun 2, 2006, 1:16 AM   #7
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Seems that most people on this board like to use Aperture priority? interesting

If I were to mess with AP, then for my lense I could only use between 3.5-6.3 or so correct? at F6.3 it would allow less light and at F3.5 it would allow more light? or do I have those backwards?


Rey thanks for the link. I have gone through it real quick but maybe I need to go back.


Thanks for your help

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Old Jun 2, 2006, 1:43 AM   #8
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Quote:
If I were to mess with AP, then for my lense I could only use between 3.5-6.3 or so correct?
No. As you've discovered, this is not the case. You can go up to F/11, F/16 etc...

This range gives you the max perture for the wide-angle and telephoto focal lengths of your zoom lens. So the max for the 18mm setting is F/3.5 and the highest for 200mm is F/6.3. The others, say 100mm for example, falls somewhere in between.



Quote:
at F6.3 it would allow less light and at F3.5 it would allow more light? or do I have those backwards?
This is correct, Larger Aperture = Lower F-Number = More Light:
http://www.canon.co.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/p_2_006.html



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Old Jun 2, 2006, 6:48 AM   #9
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Edrod13 wrote:
Quote:
Seems that most people on this board like to use Aperture priority? interesting

If I were to mess with AP, then for my lense I could only use between 3.5-6.3 or so correct? at F6.3 it would allow less light and at F3.5 it would allow more light? or do I have those backwards?


Rey thanks for the link. I have gone through it real quick but maybe I need to go back.


Thanks for your help
I think most serious photographers shoot in Aperature, as DOF control is an important situation. Light is the key to photography, and shooting in aperature is the easiest way to control it. Low light....open the lens all the way. Need everything in focus...stop down. Shooting a portrait and need the blurred background....open the lens. Hopefully you get the idea. I rarely if ever shoot in shutter priority. It's too easy to over or underexpose and its tougher to control DOF.

As rey mentioned, you can select any aperature, usually up to at least f/22. It may be a good idea to pick up a good book on photography basics. Sure you can use P all the time and get good results, but it seems like you want more control over the final image. doing some research will save you some frustration, and answer many of your basic questions.
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Old Jun 2, 2006, 1:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
This range gives you the max perture for the wide-angle and telephoto focal lengths of your zoom lens. So the max for the 18mm setting is F/3.5 and the highest for 200mm is F/6.3. The others, say 100mm for example, falls somewhere in between.
If 3.5-6.3 are the max and mins for my lens can someone tell me what would someone acheive with a higher F stop? Is going past F6.3 per say just a waste of time since thats the max already.

Sorry for such newbie questions. Thanks


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