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Old Dec 8, 2009, 1:05 AM   #811
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Old Dec 8, 2009, 12:29 PM   #812
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Hi there, Vibrant-

Thanks for posting some very nice images.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 9, 2009, 3:45 AM   #813
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Paras Shah-

Welcome to the Forum. We're pleased that you dropped by.

Thanks for posting a wonderful series of Nikon P-90 photos. Number 1 photo is my favorite.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
Hey Sarah. Thanks

Me an amateur photographer. Would love to learn new things here

With Regards,
Paras Shah

Last edited by Vibrant; Dec 9, 2009 at 3:48 AM.
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Old Dec 14, 2009, 3:36 PM   #814
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I have a question related to shutter speed. I'm new to the forum and just got my p90. Below are some sample photos i found on the web to illustrate my point.

It is my understanding that to achieve the effects of the following that a slower shutter speed is required. I'm referring to the texture and look of the water in the waterfall pic, as well as the streaking of the traffic lights in the following images.

waterfall
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/at...ll-medium-.jpg

traffic lights
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3604/...09b95ba3_b.jpg

and the opposite (higher shutter speed) is required for capturing some of the water behaviors (specifically clear individual water droplets) as in the following images, correct?

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g8...o/DSCN0355.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2422/...819c5fe171.jpg
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/at...e-dscn1977.jpg

If I am in fact on the right track, how is this setting changed on the P90?
You can change either of these settings in either S mode or M mode on the top of the camera. Since you seem new to photography in general, Id suggest using S-mode. This will allow you to select any shutter speed you desire and will automatically select an aperature setting to acheive proper exposure. May I also suggest setting your ISO to fixed range auto 64-400.
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Old Dec 14, 2009, 5:22 PM   #815
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Thanks, I'll give that a shot. Once I turn the dial to S, will I get to pick my shutter speed via the LCD? Sorry, still trying to figure this thing out.
No worries. You will be able to change the speed by using the thumb wheel located where your right thumb would fall when holding the camera. The number at the bottom of the LCD screen will change. 1/2000th of a second being the fastest shutter speed and I think 8 seconds, the slowest. Keep in mind that not all lighting conditions will allow an extremely fast speed since the amount of available light will need to be higher for faster speeds. Good luck!
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 3:35 AM   #816
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Just got my P90 today, have to say that I love it. It's what I consider my first true transformation from 35mm to digital (I've had point and shoots, but after a 35mm SLR it's hardly as much fun to not have control over your picture). I haven't gotten to do many pictures with it yet, but some of the pictures here are amazing. The other website reviews really made me question whether to get it or not due to the ISO/focus/noise issues, but this site really helped to solidify that Nikon still hasn't let me down. Thanks for all of the great examples and hard work spent on documenting this great camera!

Some things I've noticed like some people have mentioned (things that are true of almost any camera except possibly expensive DSLR's and my trusty 35mm SLR, and none of the issues bother me since I didn't buy the camera to take indoor pictures). The default white balance is typically off indoors, and needs to be manually set. Also, playing with the exposure and aperture settings indoors can make a huge difference. I was able to achieve nearly true to life color balancing with good focus without retouching. Christmas time should be a true test of family portraits.

Hoping of taking another trip into NYC again to see the tree with friends this week, I am hoping I can try some night pics (without a tripod unfortunately)...will let you know (if anyone's interested) and post some pictures if I can get decent ones.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 8:58 AM   #817
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ahh ok. This is the same wheel that adjusts the aperture for manipulating the depth of field too correct?
Yes but that would be in "A-mode" or aperture priority. In M (manual) you can adjust both independently to get the perfect picture.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 10:48 AM   #818
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Jakofharts-

Well done! You handled fbords questions about shutter control very well indeed with good explanations.

finder-

Welcome to the Forum and to the Nikon P-90 folder. We're pleased that you dropped by. Congratulations on your new P-90. It is nice to see you utilize your film DSL knowledge with the P-90.

A trip to New York at Christmas time always has the potential of some great Christmas decorations and night photo shoots. Whle you might not yet have a tripod there are quite a few tripod work arounds. Make use of ledge and rails to act as make do tripods and to stabilize your P-90. Be ready to use manually set WB. I know you will have fun. Please post some photos when you have a chance.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 8:24 PM   #819
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Default Shooting Indoors P90!!

Hi Everyone,

I was very excited to get my P90, but shooting indoors has been a difficult task for me. I've tried all the different settings, and they all seem grainy., but when I use the flash, it's not as grainy.

Outdoors pictures work nice, and I find that by adjusting the exposure and ISO helps.

I will be taking indoor newborn pictures for a friend in 2 days and need your help!

Should I use flash for them?

I just wish this camera would work better indoors! For the price it should!

Any input/advice will be much appreciated!!!

thanks!
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 11:05 PM   #820
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usmcwife-

Welcome to the Forum. We're glad you dropped by.

Because the output of the built-in flash on the Nikon P-90, like on most other super zoom camerasis low you have a limited flash range. Flash range is defined as the distance measured in feet from the camera to the subject that provides the correct exposure at ISO 100. The flash range for the P-90 is limited to 10 to 14 feet. As soon as the flash range exceeds 14 feet, the P-90 begins to increase the ISO setting. as soon as the numerical ISO setting goes to ISO 200 and above, electronic noise (which is often described as grain) begin to appear in the image.

Now the ideal way to maintain image quality is to increase the the light in the photo environment. The easiest thing would be to use a sizable external flash unit. However, the P-90 does not have a hot shoe. You still have another option. You can employ a slave flash that is triggered by your P-90's built-in flash unit. A slave flash like the DigiSlave-3000 will synch perfectly with your P-90 camera and provide flash coverage like that demonstrated in the attached photo. In the attached photo I was 23 feet away from my husband who was seated. It is a good example of what added light can do for your photo. And you will notice there is no graniness to the photo.

Finally, for the photo of the newborn. I would caution you that newborns have very sensitive eyes in the early months. I would suggest a photo in an outdoor shaded area, if the weather will allow it.

Have a great day and a Merry Christmas.

Sarah Joyce
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Last edited by mtclimber; Dec 15, 2009 at 11:10 PM.
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