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Old Nov 5, 2003, 12:21 PM   #1
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Default Nikon Speedlight Flash for 5700

I am looking at purchasing the SB22 or SB30 external flash for the 5700. Which model would provide the best overall performance?
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Old Nov 5, 2003, 5:03 PM   #2
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Default Re: Nikon Speedlight Flash for 5700

Quote:
Originally Posted by gibsonpd3620
I am looking at purchasing the SB22 or SB30 external flash for the 5700. Which model would provide the best overall performance?
The SB22 is an old model. You perhaps should consider the newer SB22s. The SB30 is too small and too weak . In terms of versatility and performance, the SB22s is much better than the SB30; however, the SB30 is small and very portable. You might also consider the SB50DX which is similar to the SB22s with some additional capabilities; but, the SB20DX DOES NOT use AA batteries.

CK
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Old Nov 5, 2003, 5:26 PM   #3
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Shene

Thanks for your advice. Other than being an older model would their be a major drawback over the 22s.

Phil
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 1:31 AM   #4
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Phil,

Quote:
Originally Posted by gibsonpd3620
Other than being an older model would their be a major drawback over the 22s.
I do not have SB22 info in hand. However, my experience in using Nikon gear for years tells me that the difference would be very minimal. If I recall correctly, the new model has 4 aperture settings to use in the Automatic mode rather than 2 in the old model, and the GN numbers should be very similar. When you put the SB22 in the TTL mode, I would not expect too much difference; however, more aperture settings means higher flexibility in the Automatic and Manual mode.

CK
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 8:43 AM   #5
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Shene

Thanks.

Phil
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 10:51 AM   #6
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I don't have my manual with me, but I think the nikon 5700 and Nikon 5400 cannot use flashes when they are set to TTL mode.

The P&S cameras don't have TTL flash metering capability.

Other than that, I think they can use just about any current Nikon compatible flash set to auto-thrystor<sp?> mode.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 4:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP
I don't have my manual with me, but I think the nikon 5700 and Nikon 5400 cannot use flashes when they are set to TTL mode.
This is wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP
The P&S cameras don't have TTL flash metering capability.
I believe you are confused my the camera TTL flash metering and the flash TTL mode. The flash TTL mode, in general, only needs a START signal to trigger the flash to fire, and a STOP signal to stop firing. The is the flash TTL mode control. As long as a flash, in TTL mode, can respond to these two signals (as well as other company specific signals) properly, the flash works fine in its TTL mode. You are right about the fact that Coolpix cameras do not have TTL flash metering; but, this does not mean the camera cannot send out TTL control signals mentioned above to control the flash that is set to TTL mode. In fact, many Coolpix users uses their external and the on-board flas in the TTL mode. The major drawbck is that exposure is not very accurate but good enough some general shooting situations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP
Other than that, I think they can use just about any current Nikon compatible flash set to auto-thrystor<sp?> mode.
This is incorrect. Do you have a Coolpix and use it with a Nikon TTL-compatible flash in TTL mode. Try it and you will see your are wrong about this. In fact, this has been a misconception or misnderstanding circulating on the Internet for quite some time.

CK
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 5:53 PM   #8
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No I'm not Since the coolpix cameras do not have the capability to do Through the Lense flash metering there is no reason to even consider using strobes in TTL mode

Quote:
I believe you are confused my the camera TTL flash metering and the flash TTL mode
Yes, I do use a nikon 5400, and "nikon compatible" flashs (Metz & Vivitar) in non-ttl mode. (as I said in my previous post the camera is not capable of ttl )
IE: the flash is in auto-thrystor mode where the flash is measuring and deciding on how much light to output.

Auto-Thrystor is not TTL.

Quote:
Other than that, I think they can use just about any current Nikon compatible flash set to auto-thrystor<sp?> mode.
Quote:
This is incorrect. Do you have a Coolpix and use it with a Nikon TTL-compatible flash in TTL mode. Try it and you will see your are wrong about this. In fact, this has been a misconception or misnderstanding circulating on the Internet for quite some time.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 11:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP
Since the coolpix cameras do not have the capability to do Through the Lense flash metering there is no reason to even consider using strobes in TTL mode
OK, that is your decision; but, it does not change the fact that one can use a Nikon TTL-compatible flash in the TTL mode with a Coolpix camera.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP
Yes, I do use a nikon 5400, and "nikon compatible" flashs (Metz & Vivitar) in non-ttl mode. (as I said in my previous post the camera is not capable of ttl )
IE: the flash is in auto-thrystor mode where the flash is measuring and deciding on how much light to output.
Again, you are confused by the camera TTL meter and the flash TTL mode. They are two different things. Are you aware of the fact the internal flash is operated in the same way? In other word, the camera does not use TTL flash metering but does control the internal flash using TTL control signals? Do you mean you don't even use the internal flash because the flash metering is not TTL?

If you say you don't trust the non-TTL flash metering (because the flash meter cannot provide a very accurate measure of the intensity of the internal or an external flash) and do not want to use the flash TTL mode, this is a perfect reason and is understandable. For example, I rarely use TTL in studio work. It is all manual, not even the Auto mode. However, saying that because the flash metering is non-TTL, one cannot use the flash TTL mode is a little bit exaggerated. I frequently mount a Nikon flash (e.g., SB30 to SB80DX) or a third party flash (e.g., Sunpak PZ5000AF) on a Coolpix 995/4500/5000/5700 and use the flash TTL mode. In most situations, this pseudo TTL (non-TTL metering in camera and TTL on a flash) work as good as or for most cases better than using the Auto mode on the flash.


Additionally, if you THINK the flash Auto mode is better than the "pseudo-TTL" mode, you'd better think again because the flash sensor on a flash may not do a better job than the one on the camera. In fact, they share the same problems: (1) they measure an area that is not what the lens sees and both are inaccurate. (2) the sensor on a flash may be even more off center than the on-camera flash sensor. This means the former may provide an even more biased reading. (3) you need to set the aperture on the flash, which might not be the same as the one used by your lens. This disagreement may provide some flexibility in fill flash; but, it may also cause trouble and produce inconsistent results. Moreover, if you set the flash aperture and camera aperture to the same, the result would be virtually identical to the "pseudo-TTL" mode if the flash is mounted on a camera. Why bother to use one more extra step? (4) since the camera has no control over the flash when the flash is in its Auto mode, the camera has no way to make any adjustment on exposure, and, as a result, incorrect exposure is likely. Furthermore, you will not be able to use the variable-power feature for flash compensation. You must do it through flash setting which is usually more tedious.

In summary, Nikon maybe stupid enough not to have a true TTL flash metering system and sometimes put the flash sensor at a wrong place (e.g., the one on the 5000). Its "pseudo-TTL" mode is not that bad and at least provides reasonably good results in general. So, I don't think your assessment regarding this TTL issue (pure technical issues aside) is a fair one.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 User Guide
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