Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Nikon

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 19, 2010, 3:46 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4
Default taking concert pics with a p90

ok, so i bought the fancy p90 to get these great shots at concerts...well i was disappointed with what i got. maybe i should have learned how to use the camera or sought advice first. pics were blurry or grainy.

this next concert, i will be sitting 12 rows back.. help!!

thanks
lsujules is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 19, 2010, 3:51 PM   #2
Super Moderator
 
Hards80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 9,046
Default

while offering a nice zoom and good performance in daylight. the P90 is a rather poor performer in low-light. it shows both a great deal of noise (grain) and also loses alot of detail to noise reduction (smeary/blurry).
Hards80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 3:56 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4
Default

so no suggestions?????
lsujules is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 4:01 PM   #4
Super Moderator
 
Hards80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 9,046
Default

you might be able to find some helpful suggestions on how to make the most of it here.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ni...ions-here.html
Hards80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 4:11 PM   #5
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Set your camera to Aperture Priority Mode, with your aperture at the lowest f/stop number (see your camera's user guide for more info).

Set your ISO speed to ISO 1600 (you don't want to go any higher with it, and you really don't want to go that high, but a bit of noise can be better than blurry photos).

Set your White Balance to Tungsten (incandescent), as that's usually a better bet for stage lighting compared to any of the other presets.

Set your metering mode to Center Weighted. It probably defaults to mult-segment (i.e, matrix) instead). Center weighted is a better bet for stage lighting.

Take some test photos while the lights are on the performers. If the exposure is too bright (and it probably will be because of darker areas in the frame), use a -EV setting with exposure compensation for a darker exposure, until the performers in the lights look properly exposed, taking test photos after each "tweak".

Once you have the exposure dialed in as close as possible for the average lighting you find when the performers are in the lights (and you can expect some to overexposed or underexposed using that technique, but it's better than lighting being "all over the board" because the metering is trying to cope with very bright and dark areas), you'll have to work on your timing.

For timing, you'll want to try and take shots when the performers are as motionless as possible to reduce the amount of blur from subject movement. IOW, wait until a long note if possible. Or, if the performers are swaying back and forth with the music, try to half press the shutter button for focus lock, then time the shots so that you press it the rest of the way down just as a performer is changing directions (so you'll capture it just as the performer is as still as possible).

Take lots and lots of photos to increase your number of keepers.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 4:20 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4
Default

thanks so much Jim!!! appreciate your advice very much!!
lsujules is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 4:41 PM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I'm not so sure you want to thank me.

As Hards80 pointed out, your camera is not really ideal for that type of environment (a dSLR model using a very bright lens is a much better solution). ;-)

To reduce the amount of noise you'll see, there are a few products you may want to try with the photos you capture. These have free or demo versions available if you look through their downloads:

http://www.picturecode.com/

http://www.neatimage.com/

http://www.imagenomic.com/

Please let us know how it turns out.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 4:46 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4
Default

yeah, well, most places consider those model "professional cameras" and wont let you bring those in!! my next concert is feb 4! and the best buy salesman suggestested this model. i should have found this forum before purchasing. however, i do like the pics i took at christmas!
lsujules is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 19, 2010, 4:48 PM   #9
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Yes, that's often true with many venues (they don't want you bringing in a camera that looks like it may be able to capture good photos). LOL

So, you have to make do with a non dSLR camera model and do the best that you can with it. Please let us know how it works out, and good luck getting some nice memories with it.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:24 PM.