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Old Dec 14, 2003, 1:43 PM   #1
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Default Coolpix 5700 telephoto not stabilized ?

Hello,
I am new at digital photography.I have a Mavica FD-97 and i like the Steady Shot feature that allows me to take pictures at full zoom without a tripod.
I have read some reviews that none of the 5 megapixel cameras nowadays have the zoom stabilized anymore.I like to take pictures of birds and other wildlife,and i was able to do so with my Mavica.Is it true that the Coolpix is not stabilized?.I guess,i am looking for some help here,because i am not sure if i really need that or not.Any thoughts?

Thank You.
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 2:35 PM   #2
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Default Re: Coolpix 5700 telephoto not stabilized ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abyss
I have read some reviews that none of the 5 megapixel cameras nowadays have the zoom stabilized anymore.
The Minolta A1, a 5mp camera, has the anti-shaking feature built-in the camera by moving the sensor rather than in the lens. The effect is the same, although the A1 may not be as effective as those SLR lenses with IS (Canon) and VR (Nikon) features. So, if you need such feature, the Minolta A1 is your only choice for now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abyss
I like to take pictures of birds and other wildlife,and i was able to do so with my Mavica.Is it true that the Coolpix is not stabilized?.I guess,i am looking for some help here,because i am not sure if i really need that or not.Any thoughts?
No, the 5700 has no image stabilization. Currently, only Minolta A1 has this feature. However, one must keep in mind that IS or VR is less effective if the camera is mounted on a tripod. If you shoot birds with your camera on a tripod, any 5mp camera with longer zoom plus tele converters will do the job well.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 6:42 PM   #3
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Thank You Shene for your reply.Much appreciated.I have already bought the Coolpix 5700 ,so i guess the Minolta is out of hte question(for now).
I know there are no fast answers.Everybody works different with a camera,but i'm left in the dark now because i don't have enough experience to really know if i need a stabilized lens or not.As i said on my previous post,the Mavica has it,and it worked very well for me.It was my first camera with such an option,and i've enjoyed the fact that i did not have to carry a tripod around.I guess,i took it for granted,that the Coolpix will have it also(did not do my reasearch properly)since is a higher end camera.In your opinion,is this stabilizer issue something to worry about or not ?
I will try both cameras side by side anyway,and i think i will learn it on my own,but i might have a chance to return the Coolpix,and i am trying to decide if i should do it only because it does not have this function.
Thank you again.
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 7:51 PM   #4
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so shene you telling me that the 70-200 L IS w/1.4x extender lens assy mounted on a wimberly mount on a tripod is less effective on a object moving or otherwise when IS is activated in either mode? i think not. there are more then subtle differences in the images there then if it were off. especially at sports events. look at the shoe on the girl and the name on the flap. she is running.

http://www.pbase.com/image/24016966

http://www.pbase.com/image/24017452

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one must keep in mind that IS or VR is less effective if the camera is mounted on a tripod
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 9:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjms
one must keep in mind that IS or VR is less effective if the camera is mounted on a tripod
I said TRIPOD! When you mount a long lens on a Wimberley mount or any other similar mounts, you have lifted the camera/lens off a stable platform. The result would be different. I guess you are too picky because everyone here knows what a tripod is and won't count a Wimberley or any other similar equipment as a tripod.

CK
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 9:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abyss
In your opinion,is this stabilizer issue something to worry about or not ?
Once a company put image stabilization on their cameras or lenses, others will follow. The question is how long will it take to have these cameras to be released. It is strange that the F828 does not have IS even though the Mavica has it. There has been an argument going for quite some time: where should the image stabilization device go, in the body or in a lens. It appears that Minolta chose to put it in the body. Currently, the body approach seems less effective than the lens approach. But, who knows. For example, initially, Nikon believed the AF motor should be in lenses as demonstrated by the F3 AF system. Then, virtually all companies moved the AF motor to camera bodies to save cost. When people realized that motor-in-a-camera-body cannot be fast enough to drive long lenses and when new technology became available, manufacturers started to put motors back to lenses. I have been using long lenses without image stabilization for many years. I found out that the addition of image stabilization is a plus; but, it would not contribute too much to my shooting. On the other hand, if you are used to image stabilization, it may be a significant impact on your shooting style. How about the use of a bean bag. This would really be very helpful if you can find a support, any support, although this approach may not be very flexible. Yes, I used bean bag frequently and found out it is very effective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abyss
I will try both cameras side by side anyway,and i think i will learn it on my own,but i might have a chance to return the Coolpix,and i am trying to decide if i should do it only because it does not have this function.
I have a few posts about 5700 vs. A1. Please take a look at them and inject some comments when you do your own comparisons:
http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=17182
http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=17609
http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=17817
It is still an ongoing research and will not end with the above three posts. I believe, initially, you will find out that the A1 may be more convenient, have a little higher noise at ISO 100, and perhaps is less sharp than the 5700. Eventually, it is your call because you are the one behind the EVF.

I believe 2004 may be a significant year with many higher end cameras with very good features to appear.

Hope this helps.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 User Guide
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 9:29 PM   #7
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a wimberley mount is an extension of a tripod just as a ball head or a any other mount. and even if it is not moving there is no diminishment of the stabilization. its in process as on the item you focus on the second you hold down the shutter release. it still does the job and makes up for any minor movement that may occur such as shake on the tripod. there is no full stationary mount. there will be vibration and it is more acute as the lens gets longer in focal length. you go out 400 or further the IS system works quite nicely over a non IS lens and in general be a sharper image.

if i were to shoot a bird in a fixed position in a tree out 200 feet or so the image has a much higher chance of being in focus then a non is. that is on a fixed ball mount or whatever. its in the long lens where IS works better.

yes i'm picky because i've been shooting for 27 years and its part of my living and work.

you said a IS/VR is less effective on a fixed mount tripod. why? is it not stabilizing the input image going to the imager in the camera body or should i assume that i must have exagerated movement to make it worth using. what i want is a sharp image from a long lens IS delivers it better then a non IS lens in general. what is the standard that you use?
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 10:29 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjms
there is no full stationary mount. there will be vibration and it is more acute as the lens gets longer in focal length. you go out 400 or further the IS system works quite nicely over a non IS lens and in general be a sharper image.
Whenever you have non-stationary components on a tripod, the IS or VR will be effective because it is what the IS and VR are designed for. On the other hand, if an IS, VR and/or AS system is on a sturdy and stationary tripod, all image stabilization systems will be less effective because they are not yet smart enough. I also have a Wimberley mount for a number of years, and I am well aware of its functionality. However, the original post was not about the Wimberley and other similar mounts. It was just about making the camera/lens stable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjms
yes i'm picky because i've been shooting for 27 years and its part of my living and work.
I happen to shoot professionally as long as you are; it may even be longer if my advanced amateur years can also be be counted. Now, I switch to a better career. Just like many know, long time veterans may not be as good as non-professionals. It is the skills that counts. Being picky is not entirely a bad thing; however, one must be aware the context. If we answer a question and go off the tangent becoming very picky, it won't help the one who raised question very well. As a professor for many years, I have learned that the easiest and best answer to a question is usually the one that is to the point and does not get into too much details that may go off the tangent. Details can be filled later when further questions will be raised.

CK
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Old Dec 14, 2003, 11:51 PM   #9
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[/quote]the easiest and best answer to a question is usually the one that is to the point and does not get into too much details that may go off the tangent
Quote:
You're right here shene.I was just looking for a little advice from people with experience.Instead,with all due respect,it looks like one post here deals with something else...how about just trying to give a quick and open opinion to the question asked in the first place?
Don't anybody get me wrong.I do not want somebody else to do the thinking for me.Let me put is this way: i am not a professional.I will never be.But i like photography.A lot.So,in order to understand,sometimes i ask other people with experience.I read a lot also.My research is still ongoing,at my level.Sometimes it just looks to me that some people do not really read the question asked,just go off about something else.
Anyway,thank you again,both of you.I will go and play with my toys,and see if i will like or hate my new one :lol:
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